72 mhz frequency scanner?

Does anyone know of a source for a 72mHz RC aircarft frequency scanner? We
would like to have one for the club field that somehow indicates when a
frequency is in use.
Thanks
Earle
Santa Fe Dam RC Modelers
AMA club 988
sfdrcm.org
Reply to
Earle
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refer to
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scroll down to "Frequencies" for information. One of the best for club use is =
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Alan T.
Reply to
A.T.
What I would be interested in is finding something that will give you the signal strength and direction so that you can hunt down the person who has left their transmitter on. At a large quarter scale meet, one guy shot down three planes because he had a dial-a-crash radio set to channel 43 when he thought he had channel 28. It took forever to find the culprit.
Reply to
Normen Strobel
Polks Hobby's Tracker II could do the job for you. The interfereing signal strength shows on a LCD bar graph. With the antenna shortened till it is less than full scale the closer you get to the offender the higher the reading. It scans all 50 channels and is a great transmitter too.
Regards, Art
Reply to
Art K6KFH
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Reply to
Randy A. Hefner
Made me go looking, but I found an excellent article including lots of help on this subject at:
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I personally own one of the Icom IC-R2 units and have found it to be very satisfactory for monitoring which frequencies are in use.
Now, to locate which radio is transmitting on which frequency, I usually use a hand held frequency counter with an antenna. It DOES require you to get close to the transmitter, so it is easy to tell which transmitter is on what frequency
bob
Reply to
Bob Cowell
Our club as one of these and they work great.
Reply to
Doug Dorton
| What I would be interested in is finding something that will give you the | signal strength and direction so that you can hunt down the person who has | left their transmitter on.
The direction isn't that easy to determine. There are directional antennas (like a yagi), which are more sensitive in one direction than another, but then you're rotating the receiver around until you find the strongest signal -- but nothing really automatic and yet small.
You could probably make an appropriate antenna and add it to the device if you really wanted to. Ask your local ham -- they'll know what to do.
| At a large quarter scale meet, one guy shot down three planes | because he had a dial-a-crash radio set to channel 43 when he | thought he had channel 28. It took forever to find the culprit.
Yikes!
Reply to
Doug McLaren
I use a ICOM 2 from
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I wish I got the Yuasa one, as it is somewhat narrower band, but the ICOM works well when fewer than 10 transmitters are on at the same time.
-Fritz
Reply to
Fritz Bien

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