Car fuel in Airplane Engine...

Hi Guys,
I am looking for some advice if anyone can offer it. I have been out of
model flying for a year or two, and am getting back into it. I have just
assembled an ARTF plane and am planning on using an "Evolution" engine that
I have only ever run about 8/10 times. The last time it ran was about 18
months ago. Needless to say it no longer "pops" over, and I need to know
whats the best way to free it up? is running a rich tank or two through it
the best, or has someone got a better idea for me?
To add to my woes, my local model shop (Galway, Ireland) is finding it a
little difficult to keep their supply of fuel going, aparently because of
clamp down/restrictions of the transport of flamable liquids. I went in
today, they had no plane engine fuel, but had fuel intended for model
cars... The guy in the shop said that basically the difference between the
two fuels, is that car fuel has a higher quality oil in it, as car engines
run a lot faster than plane engines, requiring the better oil. Is there any
problem with running this fuel in my plane engine? Or might it actually
benefit from the better lubrication, given that it has been sitting idle for
the past year and a half. By the way the fuel container says "10%" on it, is
this ok?
Sorry if these are dumb questions, so much for it being like riding a
bike.....
Thank you in advance for your help.
Brian.
Reply to
Brian
Loading thread data ...
No such thing as a dumb question, Brian. Your Evo engine should run fine on 10% nitro car fuel so long as the total oil content of the fuel is around 18 to 20 percent. The lubricants in car fuel might be "higher quality", but they often only run anywhere between 10% to 16% oil content.
If the car fuel has 16% oil content, you can go ahead and run it as is in your Evolution airplane engine and it should work fine. If the total oil content is less than 16%, or you can't find out the total oil content, then buy some castor oil at the hobby dealer or your local pharmacy and add a few ounces per gallon to the car fuel for a little added protection.
Hope this helps.
Reply to
Ed Paasch
On Sat, 31 Mar 2007 20:51:01 +0100, "Brian" wrote in :
I don't see any problem.
The car engines probably get a whole lot less air cooling than airplane engines. If so, airplane fuel in a car might cause troubles. I doubt there'd be any problem the other way 'round.
Marty
Reply to
Martin X. Moleski, SJ
"Martin X. Moleski, SJ" wrote
Prolly true, but with a "but."
The car fuel prolly is all synthetic fuel. In my book, running an airplane without castor in the fuel is a risky business. It is too easy to get a little lean, and cook your engine; at least for me.
I would , with out a doubt, add two ounces of castor oil to the gallon, before it went into my tank.
Reply to
Morgans
Thanks guys, I really appreciate the replies. The container the fuel is in does not mention the percentage of oil in it, so I will check with the shop where I bought it, they should be able to tell me. Thanks again, appreciate all your input.
Reply to
Brian
--------------
I would not run car fuel in an airplane engine using a prop without adding a good slug of castor oil (six ounces) to it.
While the small car engines really rev up, I don't think they see anywhere near the load on them that is presented to an airplane engine with a propeller.
My fear is that the engines are fitted differently because of the rpm and heat range in which they operate. I would hate to see you ruin a good airplane engine.
I'm not saying that the other knowledgeable gentlemen are wrong, but just that I am concerned for your engine's welfare.
Ed Cregger
Reply to
Ed Cregger
On Sun, 1 Apr 2007 15:16:11 -0400, "Morgans" wrote in :
1 gallon = 128 oz.
+6 oz. of oil = 134 oz. of mixture.
6/134 = ~4.5% of the total.
Marty
Reply to
Martin X. Moleski, SJ
wrote in :
Ok, apart from the fact that:
Outside the US 1 gallon is effectivley 4.54L
So using your 6 fluid ounces(US) that is 6 x 29.5mL = 177mL or 0.177L
Percentage is then: 0.177/(4.54+0.177) = 3.7% extra oil content by volume
------------------
Brian, what make & model is the fuel?
-- Chris
Reply to
Chris Dugan
"Martin X. Moleski, SJ" wrote
Well, assuming you took away 6 oz of fuel, as to make room in the container for the new 6 oz of castor oil, that would make the percentage...............
ahhhh, slightly more than 4.5% !
Reply to
Morgans
Sorry forgot to put a P.S. in!
P.S. When are you guys in the US going to join the rest of the world and go metric?
-- Chris
Reply to
Chris Dugan
I have all the tools, been ready for awhile. Bring it on.
Really though, of all the things my counrty (US) does or dosen't do that "concerns" me "going metric" isn't on the list. mk (ready in Texas)
Reply to
MJKolodziej
"Chris Dugan" wrote
Never, God willing!
Really, it is all in the money. There are machines in use that are SAE sized that were made back in the 40's, and will be in use for many years. Factor in the machines built between now and then, and everything made by those machines, and you have a lot of SAE sized stuff running around out there, that will not be replaced, without a WHOLE lot of money.
Don't forget that the average age of the US citizen is getting older, all the time.
Do you really expect all of these 50 year old plus people to stop using what they have used all of their life? Not likely.
The younger generation is more comfortable with metrics, but any really mechanical young person has to be able to go both ways. I don't see a total change for a very long time, if ever.
Reply to
Morgans
We still make a lot of stuff here that isn't metric, such as lumber. To answer your question, when will we go metric, I think the answer is when they shut down the last factory, which will likely happen any minute now.
Reply to
Robert Reynolds
A left handed shot at Al Bore and his carbon footprint horse manure. Why bother going metric when we can just wait for the carbon footprint police to shut down all the factories?
Reply to
Six_O'Clock_High

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