Electric Pattern Planes

I am looking for an electric competition grade Pattern plane. Anyone
have any recommendations for such a plane.
Electrics have come such a looking way in the last year I am hoping
that someone has built and marketed one by now that can be flown in
competition.
Thanks for you help and...
Happy Flying
Reply to
Billy V
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Just about any pattern plane can be converted to electric. I would look for one of the built up models so you can control the weight a little better. Power for this kind of plane will be VERY expensive, in the $1000 range.
Reply to
Paul McIntosh
Yeah, if you don't watch it, it could cost as much as the latest, high-zoot YS engine with accessories to make it run.
We haven't mentioned the cost of fuel yet, have we?
Ed Cregger
Reply to
Ed Cregger
I personally have no idea what to recommend, but the canadian F3A team this year is flying all electric planes...
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cheers Papa Sharptooth
Bouncing about the living room, my then three year old grandson declared himself "a kangaroo". "If you're a Kangaroo, what is Grampie", I ask. His reply:  "you a dinosaur"
Reply to
astroflyer
any recommendations for such a plane.
Check Hobby-Lobby. They have abroad line of 3D stuff. They also distribute Axi motors and there are a couple of them that are suitable for 33% scale.
The purchase cost of an electric setup will exceed that of an equivalent fueled engine aircraft. However, I suspect if one looks at the total cost of ownership over the life of the motor, battery pack, etc., that the cost is competitive. And perhaps the strongest argument for electric that I ever heard anyone utter is that an electric doesn't bog or shut down on throttle up because of a mixture or needle valve setting issue. I suspect having an engine quit in the middle of a lomczevak followed by high velocity ground impact tends to balance out the total cost of ownership equation a little more rapidly.
Charlie
Reply to
Charlie Funk
Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not so great) words of knowledge:
I don't know about pattern planes, but here is a nice 3D setup that is actually reasonable. MEC CORP.
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Then click on the price list. Setup minus battery, servos and receiver is $410.00 It is an extremely good flier.
With a 10 cell 3300 nimh pack I get about 9 minutes of aggressive flying. You would get substantially longer flying times and even better performance with lipos.
Pete is very good to work with. Very helpful and will not steer you wrong.
Reply to
Ted Campanelli
Thank you
All of you have given some help and a couple of leads to follow. I was looking for an ARF with expense being not too much of a factor.
Again thanks for the leads. If anyone thinks of any place to look please post it.
Happy Flying, Billy V
Reply to
Billy V
One of our top pilots in Canada, Colin Campbell, just converted one of his pattern designs to electric....he has a lot of good things to say about the conversion/comparison..
Dave
Colin's comments below..
First flights of the E-Enigma
Reply to
Dave
I am a newbie at electric, but I am interested enough, after having purchased a few low power electrics, to look into buying a muscle bound propulsion set up for my Great Planes Fun One (5.5 lbs.). I want the model to be powered as well as it would be with my Webra .50 onboard, but lighter, if possible.
Any hints? TIA
Ed Cregger
Reply to
Ed Cregger
To get lighter and have as much power is a real challenge Ed.
The good news is that Lithium batteries and probably a good 600W plus outrunner would be a good match for the airframe.
here are some possible motors for you - you will probably have to reconstitute the URL if your reader wraps lines.
You would need something like a 6s LIPO pack capable of 45A or better.
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(320%20-%20409%20g) Much better to pop over to the Ezone (RCGROUPS) and ask there though.
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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Ed
I'm in the process of converting a .46 size Great Planes U Can Do 3d which will be in the 5.5 - 6 lb range ready to fly.
Here is what I bought for the conversion You can vary the price a little with your choice of brands but not much.
1 Axi 4120/18 Outrunner motor 11.7 oz 146.73 1 Jeti Advance 7-3P OPTO ESC 2 oz 128.27 1 Ultimate BEC 1 oz 34.90 1 Radial Mount set & prop adapter 1 oz 28.90 5 2 cell 1500 ma LiPoly packs @ 31.20 2.8 oz 156.00 5 3 cell 1500 ma LiPoly packs @ 45.50 4.0 oz 227.50
Total weight of 49.7 oz
My Enya .80 24 oz 500 ma flight pack 4 oz 12 oz fuel approx 10 oz
Total weight of glow power system approx 38 oz at take off
A total investment of 722.30 in power system. I'm sure there will be some misc items such as connectors , switches etc that will probably run 50.00 bucks or so and of course some asstd props at 5-6 bucks each.
I planned on a 5s5p battery configuration which will give me 18.5 volts and 7500 mah. May be a little more than I need so I'm going with a 3s3p first to see how that does....which will also lighten my system 13.6 oz for a total of 36 oz which puts me in the range of a glow system.
I'm not sure how much the weight difference between 3s3p and 5s5p will affect flight duration and performance but I suppose I will find out.
It's not cheap but I think it will be worth it. Although I still fly glow , I 've been flying electrics very actively for about 4 years now but these have all been small , lightweight aicraft in the 1-2 lb range.
Looking forward to trying out the U Can Do. :-)
Ken Day
Reply to
Ken Day
I see that my Charter cable system is on the blink, which would explain why my response, made many, many hours ago, never made it to the newsgroup. This is why I maintain one of the ultra cheap dial-up providers - "Just In Case". 8^>
What does 5s5p mean? It looks like 5 in series with 5 in parallel? I doubt that...
I used to fly a little competition fun fly, so a flight duration of 5 minutes would be plenty for me.
How long does it take to charge the Li-Poly packs? If you want to fly the way you would with a glow powered plane, can you do it with a field charger? Or do you need to have multiple packs pre-charged?
Why did you choose that particular motor? I'm curious. I would like to learn some of the logic that you employed, even if it was cost based.
That's a lot of questions. I'm sorry if I have loaded you down with too much. Thanks for jumping in there and providing some useful information.
Ed Cregger
Reply to
Ed Cregger
It does mean just that. 25 cells
It takes over an hour to fuylly recahrge packs, but if you run tehm conservaticely (advised for decent life on teh v expensive packs) you should get 3 5 minute flights between full recharges, and maybe a 20 minute charge time aftre a single flight. I find with take off and landing and some low throttle flying, it takes me about twice as long to recharge as the total length of flight - i.e. all of it from walking out with te planbe, checking out, takeoff/alnding and retrieval etc.
I can get aanuthing from 15 minute sto 490 minurtes out of one charge as well, which often means I simply don't bother to field charge at all.
Its a very good replacement for a 40 sized glo - similar power/RPM curve to a decent 4-stroke ands turns similar sized props without needing a gearbox. Its not horrendously exensive.
PACKS are almost more important than motors you will find. The batteries are what proiduces the power. The motor is just a small part of the overall power train.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
I have a total of 10 packs....five 2 cell and five 3 cell 1500 ma. I wired one 2 and one 3 cell in series to get 18.5 volts. Then I wired those five in parallel to get 7500 ma. I think I will change it to 5s3p after talking to some electric flyers who are getting 10-12 minutes aggressive flying with this configuration in the same weight 3d type aircraft.
I think I will change it to 5s3p (18.5 v 4500 ma) after talking to some electric flyers who are getting 10-12 minutes aggressive flying with this configuration in the same weight 3d type aircraft. It should do (on paper) 6.75 min at full throttle.
I can charge all the packs in one hour on my Astro Flight 109 D. It has a max charge rate of 8 amps and it will actually do that. I have a parallel charging module that I picked up at Hobby Lobby.You can plug up to 5 packs into it. It was cheaper than buying enough Deans connectors to make my own and very convenient.
Actually , it wasn't cost based. As you can see I spent a few bucks , so I wasn't going to let a few dollars more ruin my experience.
I chose that particular motor because:
(1) I like outrunners.I have other smaller ones and I really like them. No gearboxes. Very smooth , quite power.
(2) It will handle the voltage and amperage to get the total watts I need .18.5v x 40 amp = 740 watts which gives me approx 125 watts per pound which will give me the performance I want.
(3) I have seen many electric conversion articles where they used the same motor with excellent results.
(5) and most important.....it's real "pretty"....and sexy , in that black and gold case. :-)...add a shiny prop adapter...Mmmm...mm.
No problem at all.
Ken Day
Reply to
Ken Day
Ed , almost forgot. As "Natural" said in one his posts , the most important part are the batteries. Thats really where you start when you are deciding on a power system.
First figure how many watts per pound you need , how many minutes flying time and that will determine the batteries you need. Then find a motor and speed control to handle them. I may be oversimplifying things a bit , but thats the basic process. Unlike glow , electric motors have a wide power range depending on what you feed them and how you prop them. Thats why it's hard to compare to a glow engine.
Ken Day
Reply to
Ken Day
Ed,
If you want to talk equivalent power to the latest YS, you will be in the multiple thousands for electrics. Figure out what it takes to get 2100 watts of power for 15 minutes.
Reply to
Paul McIntosh

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