How to start in RC Flying

I am looking into starting up RC flying. One option
is to purchase the G2 program and practice at home.
Another is to do park fliers just as the Aerobird.
Of course I could do a full blown trainer like Hanger 9
has. But that means about $300 and some commitment which
I am not sure of as I do not know if I will really like
the hobby.
Any thoughts.......
Reply to
N9NWO
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|I am looking into starting up RC flying. One option |is to purchase the G2 program and practice at home. |Another is to do park fliers just as the Aerobird. | |Of course I could do a full blown trainer like Hanger 9 |has. But that means about $300 and some commitment which |I am not sure of as I do not know if I will really like |the hobby. | |Any thoughts.......
I would like to see what others suggest as well. I gather that you are asking, not telling.
Reply to
R. David Steele
Given that you're not sure you will like the sport, you are wise to consider cheaper beginner options than the full-blown trainer rig.
If there isn't a club close to you, a park flyer may be the smart way to go. I know very little about these planes, so let those with more experience advise you which one to get. I will say, however, that there will be a BIG difference in that plane and say, a Hanger 9 trainer.
The Real Flight program is good. Again, though, you're laying out some major bucks there. Dr.1 Driver "There's a Hun in the sun!"
Reply to
Dr1Driver
N9Nwo,
I started on the Firebird II(2 channel) then moved up to the Aerobird (3 channel). The Aerobird gives you experience more like many glow's with your basic up/down - left/right on your right hand stick. You can also get down the basics of flight control as the plane comes at you vs going away. Finally, it's cheap to repair & takes a LOT of abuse & still flies!
It's been upgraded recently & renamed to Aerobird Challenger. Still 3-channel, but now has 2 flight control modes (beginner & advanced). Prices vary from around $120-$160.00 RTF.
Then when you're ready you can get flight training at a local club on glow's, and they can advise you on what to get in a glow plane. The Aerobird gives you most of your basic flight training, but you will need instructor help on landings & takeoff of glow's. --
Jim L.
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Using - Virtual Access(OLR), ZAP 4.0, & WinXP Pro w/SP1
Reply to
Jim Lilly
Welcome to a great hobby. The idea of a simulator is excellent. You can learn a lot about flying and not too many worries about crashing and spending more $$$.
When you do get serious, visit a local flying field and see what they recommend for a trainer. The Hangar 9 Alpha is a good choice, but there are others just as good.
Read some magazines and talk to people.
Dick Pettit WA2ROC Associate Editor R/C REPORT Magazine
Reply to
Dick pettit
I understand that you don't want to commit to the hobby yet. But playing with the G2 is really only playing a computer game and not really experiencing what the hobby has to offer. I don't know your situation or where you live, but if possible, I would highly recommend visiting a local flying site and introducing yourself to some of the members you find there. If you tell them about your interest in the hobby, I can almost guarantee that one of them will volunteer to hook up a buddy box and give you some flight time. Then you'll have a better idea of what the hobby is about as opposed to a computer game that "simulates" flying. With the computer game, you don't get the wind in your face, the smell of the fuel, the sound of the engines and the friendly conversations with the guys at the field who will answer all your questions. No computer game can do those things. For computer games, I prefer Diablo II. Now THAT'S good gaming.
MJC
Reply to
MJC
Not mentioned elsewhere so I'll throw it in here ... there is a fair second hand market for Real Flight G2. A big part of the initial cash outlay can be recouped if interest wanes. I traded my copy for a complete Sig Something Extra w/ motor.
As others have commented, I am a big fan of simulators as a learning tool for beginners.
Live long, and prosper Jerry L. Gubka
-- ------------------------------------------ gray-bearded tramp miner looking for work (experienced mine planner available) http:/home.comcast.net/~jlguru/JLGHome00.htm------------------------------------------
Reply to
Jerry L. Gubka
Find your local club & field and go talk to some people. A kind soul might even let you buddy up on their plane and give you some idea of what it's like.
Russ.
Reply to
Russ
Try out one of the freeware sims:
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Reply to
aeropal
I think that is spot on. If you like G2 you will like the real thing even more.
G2 fetches a good price secondhand if you don't like it.
The aerobird stuff is probably quite fun, but if you get through G2 and can
land a plane in that, really any decent traner - Glo or electric - will be within reach.
If you have gopod clubs locally go and hang out. If not get a leccy parkflyer, and cut yer teeth on that. You will crash it lots, so regard it as a 'consumable'
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
No, its a lot better than that. Full size pilots use simulators in training - don't sneer at it. Its VERY good.
Once I learnt to fly G2, I found I could also fly my planes. It saved me a fortune.
Actually you do get the sound of the wind, the effect of the wind and plenty of snide comments from the guys at the 'club'
You also get to fly limbo competitions, scatter teh place with trees and land despite that, and the chance to practice whatever dangerous manouever you want over and over again without several hours and hundreds of dollars repair bills in between.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
You need to examine why you want to do it, deciding which area interests you most then focusing upon it as you have to start somewhere. You may well change focus later as with first hand experience you become better informed. For this reason, don't go ballistic buying all the glam gear you set your eyes on, which is a very real temptation to most caught up in the excitement inspired when starting out.
An R/C sim is a good idea, but you don't need to go to the expense of G2 initially. FMS is free and is a training aid par excellence for students. Importantly, depending upon your transmitter, you can obtain a lead to use your own transmitter in conjunction with it for as little as USD$5. Most importantly, a simulator will not teach you how to fly RC, but it will prove an invaluable training aid in conjunction with good flight instruction smoothing and accelerating your learning curve and proficiency considerably *when used correctly*.
Lots of people enjoy these park flyers, but they are unrepresentative of IC R/C and limited in their scope.
Go down to your local RC club and make enquiry. Most clubs have an "all equipment provided" to solo club sponsored club trainer available on a "pay as you go" usually for fuel only training scheme. By the time you've proceeded any distance along that path, you'll have a better idea of whether you might want to make the commitment and if so, what you'll need and want.
cheers
p
Reply to
pimpf
Not to criticise G2's functionality, but don't you think that if he's hesitant about initially paying out for tangible RC equipment, pandering to Realflight's usury at this juncture is moot? Especially where for a student or the average early post solo phase flyer, FMS which is free, will adequately fulfil the role.
cheers
p
Reply to
pimpf
I gotta get in on this too. Ive been lurking for months now, Letting everyone else ask the newbie questions.. But hey....ive been doing right by newbies over in the dot-land group for several years now, i musta paids my dues. What would the collective opinion (and im impressed by the hardcore serious folks here voicing opinions) be for an aged rc car vet with moderately limited funds (i save up my morning bagel+coffee money so the wife doesnt have to know) who wants to get into rc.air? Im totally familiar with glow, cars anyway, and the whole concept of spatial reasoning is second nature to me. I can crash a car coming or going....hehe. Mind you, ive only held an airplane tx once. I helped a friend build an eaglet when i was maybe 17 or so. On its maiden flight, he handed me the tx and said something like "here pal, thanks for helping me build it". The plane was a big cigarette butt in 10 seconds. Nobody bothered to explain to me that to make a plane go up, you pull the stick *down*.
Anyway, im considering both the leccy way, with maybe a tigermoth or slowstik, or a glow avistar. Do you suppose that i really should hook up with a local club (dunno if there is one ...central NJ?...) and get a trainer to drag me through this? I suppose i ought to just get SOMETHING and get off my arse, but IMHO, goods advice is worth the time. TIA, mike
Reply to
MikeF
First of all, I do agree that G2 is not cheap. HOWEVER it sells at that price, its a pro piece of software, and it gets upgraded.
Secondly, as has been pointed out, it probably has better resale value than almost anything else you might spend money on in this hobby. Try selling a smashed up 40 trainer for anything like what you paid for it, or even an engine and radio.
I can't answer points relating to FMS because I have not used it.
My opinion is unchanged: If you cannot practically get buddy style training - and lots of it - then G2 will save you money - lots of money. FMS may well save you more. I can't say.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
into rc.air?
reasoning is
when i was
if there is
Two entirely different routes depending on WHY you want to do it.
IF you like ragging about with a bunch of good ole boys with castor smeared all down their jeans, go up to the club and see what they have to offer.
IF you just want to fly a plane and can't be arsed with the club thing, get a slowstick or other parkflyer, second hand radio off Ebay, join the Ezone
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build your flyer taking the advice you get there, chuck it into a calm winters morning air, and - have fun?
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Mike, you can easily find a club near you if you go to
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and use their handy club search engine. You can fly the slow flyers almost anywhere, providing it's calm. However, glow/gas burners generally have a higher thrill factor than slow flyers, although there are some electrics that have a very high thrill factor! -- Morris Lee snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net
(dunno if there is
Reply to
Morris Lee
In a word, yes.
You've already seen one obvious difference between mud-flingers and airplanes - that up-down business can be a real ankle-biter.
While knowing that left is right when the car is coming toward you is one thing, it's quite another to see the airplane go left when you meant right _and it goes up or down as well_.
'nother major difference is that airplanes, unlike dirt diggers, work equally well upside down in most cases, so you have the situation where not only is right left but up is down, so to speak.
You've got half a leg up on folks who haven't done any r/c at all, but the term 'three mistakes high' is germane to all new fliers.
Cheers, Fred McClellan the dash plumber at mindspring dot com
Reply to
Fred McClellan
Hmmm. Sounds like the correct answer then is "both". Thats what i was afraid of. I already have 6 cars - basically because i wanted one suitable for anything i felt like (and a few spares) Anyone care to sell me an entire collection and save me a little time? Thanks, mike
Reply to
MikeF
hehe...remember that i DO actually have a little Take-off & Landing experience from my monster trucks. Not nearly as graceful as a plane, but not exactly limited to 2D either. Driving around in a left-hand circle is kinda boring, its getting vertical that makes it worth the hassle. Thats why planes are tickling me fancy now.
I think that by the time i got a plane upside down (on purpose anyway) that id be pretty comfortable with it.
As in," keep enough altitude so that you can make as many as three mistakes before augering in"? Thanks for the replys everyone! Mike
Reply to
MikeF

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