Neon Monocote

I'm using neon yellow to cover an Uproar(40) and the first large piece stuck
to it self like shelf paper. Could not get it apart to cover with, the glue
pulled off. I was very careful afterward. Has anyone has this happen?
mk
Reply to
MJKolodziej
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Are you sure it's actual Monokote brand covering? I've never had Monokote stick to itself without heat applied.
Some off brands (generic Chinese nockoff's?) have the sticky shelf paper adhesive and don't hold their tautness very well.
Reply to
Vance Howard
This is how all Monokote used to be, before they reformulated the adhesive some years ago. You never, ever wanted to let Monokote touch itself because chances were you were never going to be able to salvage the piece. Yes, it has happened to me too. The newer Monokote is generally not as bad as it used to be.
Ed Cregger
Reply to
Ed Cregger
FWIW, I've been using TowerKoat, a cheaper substitute, and have had no such problems.
"MJKolodziej" wrote in message news:fchtvi$47g$ snipped-for-privacy@aioe.org...
Reply to
BCRandy
How long ago was that? My first stint in RC was in the early 70's, and it didn't stick to itself then....
PCPhill (unreformed top poster)
Reply to
PCPhill
-----------------
I'm not calling you a liar Phil and I doubt that you are calling me one.
I'm sure you wouldn't have said what you said unless that was your experience.
Conversely, I wouldn't have said what I said if it wasn't my experience. It is therefore obvious that both of our experiences are true, but under different circumstances, which would account for our different experiences.
Just for the record, I am talking about the sticking of glue bearing surface to glue bearing surface. This does make a difference.
Ed Cregger
Reply to
Ed Cregger
On Mon, 17 Sep 2007 07:56:48 -0400, "Ed Cregger" wrote in :
I have observed this happen in my scrap box.
I don't remember it being difficult to avoid when trying to apply the covering to an airframe.
It doesn't take a whole lot of warmth to start causing Monokote to adhere. You can get a little bit of stick just from warm fingers. The fellow who taught me to fly RC used to get beautiful Monokote-over-Monokote trim by using the "low" power setting on his heat gun. In fact, it is a "no" power setting intended for cooling the element before turning the fan off.
I'm not patient enough to try his "low" power approach. I just fry the stuff on and pop the bubbles with a pin. It looks OK from six feet away, if you squint. If anyone gets inside the six-feet-and-squint zone, I cross them off my list of friends.
Marty
Reply to
Martin X. Moleski, SJ
wrote in :
Its a nightmare with Solite (Nelson Litefilm).
I have resorted, when doing tailpanes of thin section, to dusting the already covered side internally with talc..
It doesn't take ANY warmth with solite..
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Not what I meant Ed, I try not to get into flame wars. I thought you'd been into RC long before me and thought it had probably been refomulated waaay back....
PCPhill
Reply to
PCPhill
----------------
Sorry, Phil. You and I always seemed to get along pretty well. Glad that we still are.
I'm a little touchy because of the last couple of weeks on a popular R/C forum.
I could swear that the original Super Monokote was more flexible, rubbery, opaque and the glue seemed to be a bit "wetter", for lack of a better way to say it, than today's offering. I will admit that the most recent additions are not as likely to randomly stick together as the old stuff, but that might have something to do with the ambient temperature too. We didn't have air conditioning in my house when using the original Super Monokote in the late sixties and early seventies.
Ed Cregger
Reply to
Ed Cregger

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