Fire and burgler alarm symbols

Can anyone help me with fire and burglar alarm systems symbols? We do structural mainly, so do not deal with any so I have no ideal what the symbols look like. The person we receive the hard copy drawings from just placed a joke schedule on the drawings. Any help will be appreciated.
Chuck
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Suggest you contact a supplier. If anything like structural connector companies they will send you a cd so that the images you use will be images of their product, and your specs will read "FireStorm a-3657 or equiv." (totally imaginary spec.) Also warn you to be careful. At least 3 P.E.'s that I personally know of locally got licenses suspended or censures for sealing drawings with fire equipment and/or electrical system specs. This was over a period of several years admittedly, but those are just the ones I know. Keep in mind that a P.E. license is based upon your field of training and experience. Going outside areas where you can prove expertise invites problems.
Chuck Fleming wrote:

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structural mainly, so do not deal with any so I have no ideal what the symbols look like. The person we receive the hard copy drawings from just placed a joke schedule on the drawings. Any help will be appreciated.
I've done electrical engineering for over 30 years. And the sad fact of the matter is, there is no 'standard' for electrical symbols (here in Canada at least). There should be, but the fact of the matter is, there is as many symbol variations as Heinz has Pickles.
A Heat detector typically is a 1/8" diameter circle with an X in side it. Then you fill in two 'halfs' and you have your symbol (that typically is a somewhat consitent symbol). A smoke detector on the other hand can be similar to a heat detector, except you use a Square instead of a Circle. But then I've seen smoke detectors a circle that is 1/2 solid.
Manual pull stations are typically a Box with an "F" inside. Gongs are all over the map again, etc.
Security devices are even more all over the frigging map. Some use symbols, others use a box with a Number designation.
You might find some decent local Electrical Consultant who would allow you to use (or look at) their symbols. Bottom line is, you could use what you wanted, as long as you have a Symbol Schedule which identifies each symbol.
I could send you what I use for what it's worth. I don't mind either way.
Regards,
BruceF
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Heh heh, sound advice and pickles in one post!
--


MichaelB
www.michaelbulatovich.ca
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structural mainly, so do not deal with any so I have no ideal what the symbols look like. The person we receive the hard copy drawings from just placed a joke schedule on the drawings. Any help will be appreciated.

It is true that there is no real established use of standard symbols in the fire alarm idustry. However, there are a set of established symbols for fire protection work contained in NFPA 170. I have seen a migration to their sybmols by many in the industry of the last several years, but agree in my 25+ years of desiging fire alarm systems, I even have problems getting engineers in my different offices to use the same set of symbols.
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Chuck Fleming wrote:

other responses are all true.
I don't do burgler drawings but the fire alarm drawings I have done use hexagons, squares, and circles ( sometimes with a triangle attached for a horn on a horn-strobe ) then a letter someone thought appropriate inside the outline. but a pull station could be a "P" or an "F" or even an "M" for "manual pull". then when you have a cabinet of some sort, a rectangle big enough for the text - "FACP" comes to mind.
the only thing I really want to add is that if you are making up symbols, I like to have all my text a uniform size. so, I make the outline AROUND the text for the symbol.
and I have become VERY FOND of making the outline a region, giving it an elevation, and not breaking the wiring around the symbol. then I can hide lines before I plot. my wire lines represent conduit, and the editing is much easier when they move or delete device ( or three ).
heads up. if your symbols are blocks you can update them with ease globally, but you must be thinking when you create them for being on the wall v.s. on the ceiling for the insertion points.
cheers.
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