we need sulphur concrete for knife repair

Hello!
We need for the repair of special knives "sulphur concrete" but a little shop where we bought it until now is closed because the owner is dead. Now
we are not able to find a supply. Does anybody know where we can get sulphur concrete?
Thank you!
Best regards and merry christmas!
Martin www.knifeshop.com
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knifeshop.com Handels GmbH Breitenfurter Str 383 1230 Vienna Austria - EU
www.knifeshop.com
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Is this a yellow substance that you melt and then pour into the knife handle to secure the blade to the handle? Does it turn an amber color when heated but return to bright yellow when cool?
If so then this is plain old elemental sulfur. It was widely used before epoxy for things like anchoring nuts into concrete and so on.
If you don't need authenticity, you can substitute epoxy for the sulfur. If you need authenticity then simply look in your local business directory for sources of sulfur. Garden supply stores often sell it as a pesticide. Purity unknown. Purity doesn't much matter for this application.
There is nothing special about this sulfur so any source that you locate will work fine.
John -- John De Armond See my website for my current email address http://www.neon-john.com http://www.johndearmond.com <-- best little blog on the net! Tellico Plains, Occupied TN If the letters PhD appear after a person's name, that person will remain outdoors even after it's started raining.
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Pure can be bought as 'flowers of sulfur' something like that might be gotten at a 'chemist' - we call pharmacist here in the states that sell medicines. It is often used in medicines.
Martin
Neon John wrote:

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Hi!
Thank you for your fast response!

It is not only sulphur. Yes sulphur is yellow but it is sulphur mixed with other gray color materials as cement and other parts. But I don't know the exact composition and I don't know the components.
You are correct we need it to secure blades in the handle.
Did you use only sulfur for secure the blades in the handle? I didn't tried it until now.

yes, I founded the word "elemental sulfur" some days ago in search engines.
I know the source of sulphur in my town but they don't know the word "elemental sulfur".
It is easy to get only sulphur. I asked in the meanwhile architect and constructor because I found in the web more pages that sulfur concrete is used at buildings. But they don't know it.
It is difficult to locate a source. Until now we bought it from a other worker but he died 1 year ago and his wife don't know the source.
The problem is that I don't know the components of the gray cement part
Best regards
Martin
--

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knifeshop.com Handels GmbH
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Try googling sulphur cement
Mike Graf
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Not exactly what you asked, but here are a couple of other uses for plain sulphur (Flowers of Sulphur) that may relate to your needs: -I have heard of using melted sulphur to "cement" machine anchors in place for heavy machines. -I think gunsmiths have also used it to get the profile of the of the chamber end of the barrel. They plug the barrel with a wad of paper, then pour in molten sulphur, It hardens quickly and can be pushed out easily. The feature here is that the sulphur apparently doesn't shrink at all when it cools , so you get an accurate "casting" of the chamber for taking measurements.
Pete Stanaitis ---------------------

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The feature here is that the sulphur apparently doesn't shrink

Not only does it not shrink, it actually expands! That and water are the only things I know to do that when they solidify, though there's probably more examples out there.
-Rob
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The feature here is that the sulphur apparently doesn't shrink

chamber
Not only does it not shrink, it actually expands! That and water are the only things I know to do that when they solidify, though there's probably more examples out there.
-Rob
Antimony expands as it sets, which is why it is used in typemetal to get a well defined impression.
AWEM
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