Chuck key was bent into a pretzel

First ever blacksmithing project of mine
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I used a O/A torch for heating.
Reply to
Ignoramus16228
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Good job
I'll trade you an electric blower forge for some 9X42 knee mill ballscrews :-)
RogerN
Reply to
RogerN
Funny, I was just about to head off to Home Depot to get parts for a propane blower.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus16228
I gotta ask, how did thw chuck get bent into a pretzel shape?
Reply to
mrbonaparte
No idea, I bought it in this condition. My guess is that someone used pipe extensions to increase chucking force.
Reply to
Ignoramus16228
In that case I'd rather own the key than the chuck.
Mike Graf
Reply to
CGraf
Good job. I suspect the long cheater handle was a replacement at one time and of lower steel grade and thus bent.
Martin
Ignoramus16228 wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
It looks like a real handle, with rounded edges, etc.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus26369
Ignoramus26369 fired this volley in news:LJudnULHHcLRD9LUnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com:
Real metalworkers make metal parts that look real... with rounded edges, etc., Iggy.
Even if I just scab-weld an extension on a handle, I'm going to take the time to blend and finish the union.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Yep, particularly on tools, Loyd. I can't stand to feel sharp edges on handles or tools.
For lathe chuck wrenches I've made, for example, it's very little trouble to chuck the parts and radius the ends, or chamfer with the part spinning. Then the assembled parts are comfortable to use.
Most of the parts on my machines and tools have the corners and edges knocked off with a file or mini grinder. It doesn't take much of an injury to let the blood out of fingers and knuckles.
Reply to
Wild_Bill
Look at the picture of the original handle:
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The handle end is not just chamfered, it is rounded to a ball shape.
Reply to
Ignoramus26369
Ignoramus26369 fired this volley in news:pd6dnXct2OEdM9LUnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com:
I don't know how to break this to you, Iggy, but that's pretty basic stuff, even for a crank with nothing but a drill press and a file.
('course... you gotta have a chuck key to use it....)
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
I do not see the point of arguing about it, the handle looked original. Maybe someone really did spend time and made a nice replica, which I agree is not too difficult, but there was not a single indication on it that it was not original.
Reply to
Ignoramus26369
Radiused, ya might say. Not difficult to do with a file, especially if the shaft is spinning.
Do you realize that a chuck key is two separate parts?
I've seen 'em, I've made 'em.
What else is there to see?
Reply to
Wild_Bill
If the dude just spent some time reading metalworking topics rather than posting 2 day old news stories, he might know more about metalworking skills.
Now where the hell would I get a pin like that? McMaster, Enco, J&L? What would it be called? I worry that it might cost money.
Reply to
Wild_Bill
What are you trying to prove here?
That the handle "might be a replacement" just because it is easy to make?
And then you make a half dozen posts to this effect?
What is the point of this?
i
Reply to
Ignoramus26369
Loosen up your panties, Ig.
I didn't say the handle was replaced, and I'm not really sure that I care if it was.. no wait, I don't.
If I had been wanting to repair a chuck key, I would have cut the old handle pin, driven it out, and made a new one. I also don't straighten used nails.
I don't care that you did it a different way than I would have. I don't have any interest in your chuck key at all.
There wasn't anything to be proven by my couple of posts regarding metalworking. I don't know why you would think there was.
Are you opposed to me exchanging comments on metalworking with Lloyd?
Again, this is a metalworking newsgroup, and that's why I'm here.
Reply to
Wild_Bill
"Wild_Bill" fired this volley in news:mhQ3l.1273$ snipped-for-privacy@en-nntp-07.dc.easynews.com:
And, for what it's worth Iggy, you could've replaced that handle (in a workman-like manner) in the time it took to photograph and post it.
My point was in counter to yours; your maintaining that because the handle looked finished and properly manufactured, that indicated it was the original one.
ANY handle made by a conscientous worker would look "finished and properly manufactured".
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Gee wiz WB, always doing things the easy way :-) I suspect that Iggy's main goal wasn't to repair his chuck key the best way as much as it was to practice some blacksmithing. In that case straightening out used nails isn't out of the question. I remember in high school metal shop, we had to make some useless junk to learn the metalworking skills that the textbook wanted us to learn. I wish the school would tell the students what skills they are to practice or learn, and let the student do their own project to utilize that skill. One of my friends went on to college for machining, they also made useless projects to learn their machining skills.
Today Iggy's straightening out bent chuck keys, tomorrow he might be forge welding making damascus steel. :-)
RogerN
Reply to
RogerN
Point taken.
What I wanted was to try blacksmithing.
Reply to
Ignoramus26369

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