Chuck key was bent into a pretzel



That's right.

Which is something I did on a regular basis when I was a teen.

I am still looking for some application of blacksmithing that would be useful in some practical way (as opposed to making decorations). That was the attraction of the chuck key straightening.
I agree with Lloyd in that it was not the most practical thing to do.
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I think forged metal is generaly stronger than machined. You could make tools such as screwdrivers, punches, chisels, or knives. Anyway you look at it, it is good to have more skills and abilities. A guy I worked with at the machine shop had a friend in school. The guy was working on an art project and he was trying to make a piece of steel round using a forge, anvil, and hammer. The guy I worked with saw a metal lathe in the shop and asked his friend why he didn't just turn it on the lathe, the guy didn't know how to use a lathe. So the machinist helped him machine the round part. The point to this being that the more you know, the more capable you'll be to pick the best process to make what you need to make.
RogerN
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When my daughter went to college for a black-smithing course, one of the first exercises was straightening out old horse-shoes. They then went on to make things out of them.
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Stuart Winsor

For Barn dances and folk evenings in the Coventry and Warwickshire area
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Wild_Bill wrote:

(snip)
I've been known to do that very thing.... ;)-
Matt
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matthew maguire wrote:

I like to bend nails ;-)
I just forge welded, twisted and opened 8 nails, four small, four large, loop on one end spike on the other.
The small item is a unisex pendant.
The large item also has some marbles trapped in the "basket", to be hung in front of a window.
Regards Charles P.S. The idea was provided on another blacksmith list.
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Chilla wrote:

Cool! Is it an art thing or just cuz you wanted to see if you could do it?
Matt
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matthew maguire wrote:

Well a Yahoo! list member showed the results of their work, so I thought I'd give it a try, with some bog standard bullet headed nails from the local hardware store.
So two tests, 1) to see if the nails were up to it, and 2) to see if my setup could do it.
Yes to both :-)
The only thing I did differently to the guys on the Yahoo! list was, after forming the cage, was to close it cold by using a vice. This way I can put anything inside the piece, whether flammable or not.
Regards Charles
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On Tue, 23 Dec 2008 12:55:34 -0600, matthew maguire

And if the head is on the wrong end of the nail, I save it for the other side of the house. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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wrote:

I think the point was to see how fast you can be made to cry over the internet.
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The ends are bat ends - like switches. And that could be a copy of a short one.
Did it have a raised center that cut into the hole ? Even that is possible.
The S curve might have been from the chuck rotating on the ways.... But I suspect it was set for another reach over tool. - Kinda like a nut driver that fits over the end of the key and over the rods. That might have been a motor drive chuck key. You know managers - more and more and faster..... ;-)
Martin
Ignoramus26369 wrote:

http://igor.chudov.com/projects/misc/Anvil/03-Straightening-Chuck-Key/03-Straightening-Chuck-Key-0002.jpg
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It has a checkering pattern in the middle.

Good point. I should have asked that foreman about it. He was a very nice guy. This was a mold shop whose owner retired to Arizona and closed it.
i

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in

That's called knurling. I have a knurling tool. When I fabricate a shop-made handle that needs "grip", I knurl it.
LLoyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> fired this volley in

BTW... THAT particular knurl isn't for gripping. It's to make the pin - that is fitted to slide into the hole - a tight fit in its middle.
LLoyd
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On 2008-12-23, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

That's what it is for, so that the pin would stay in the middle.
I thought that a knurl was a pattern where the ridges would be a lot closer to each other, in this case they were relatively far from one another, in relation to their height.
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in

Knurling rollers are available in any number of patterns, and can be custom-made for specific things -- like puffing up the o.d. of a pin.
LLoyd
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On 2008-12-23, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

Good to know.
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Any number of methods can be used to make parts stay in place, Ig.
Sometimes just stamping a part with indentations is enough to upset/displace enough material to make the part a tight fit. These assembly methods aren't indefinitely permanent, but they are cost effective.
In the same way that using a center punch on a piece of metal causes the metal around the point to be displaced upward, parts are often knurled or pressed/stamped with surface irregularities to make parts stay together.
Another method would be to make a small undercut/groove in the middle of the pin, then stamp the side or top of key body portion with a concentrated force at an outer location of the hole to deform some of the key body portion into the undercut/groove to secure the pin.
A quick amount of force applied to a part is always cheaper than a setscrew or other fastener, from a manufacturing point of view.
--
WB
.........
metalworking projects
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On 2008-12-23, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

    Well ... that *should* be a straight knurl, but it sounds as though he has a diamond knurl instead. That will still hold in the body, but not as well as the straight knurl would.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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I have a lathe with several Knurling. I didn't think that would be called that - being lines only. But I remember I have a set of wheels for that.
Martin
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

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Yes, they are lines, I would say 1/8" apart. I can take a picture if you want. Their sole purpose is to keep the pin centered. I would not want knurling on the part of the pin that I grip.
i

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