Chuck key was bent into a pretzel

in wrote:

wheels
Just so we keep this on the up-n-up... the "knurl" on your part is probably not done with a knurling wheel, but with a press, and a die and punch, both equipped with an edge that can stamp the grooves into the pin. Likely, the pin is rotated once, twice, or three times to get the spacing of the grooves approximately (but not precisely) distributed around the circumference.
Because the pin is small, it doesn't take too many "stripes" to make it enlarge, and work of a tiny diameter isn't as conducive to wheel knurling as larger work.
LLoyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    O.K. It is common to make a straight knurl to give something to bite into the body of the key so the handle won't slip out. Sounds as though yours was a diamond knurl instead -- not quite as good for the purpose, but probably what he was set up for.
    I agree with others that that was not the original handle, just a well made shop-made one. Depending on the size of the chuck key, they either have a much shorter T-handle, or a handle which has one end squashed down to an oval flat for the thumb, and the other end a plain bar, still not as long as yours is. I prefer the T handle to the one with the thumb rest, because you can easily use it in either of two 180-degree separated orientations, so the wear on the gear teeth is evened out a bit more. Even so, I've seen them so badly worn that they won't work either way around.

    Unlikely, as that it most likely the key for a Jacobs style drill chuck, not a lathe chuck. Though I do have a 3-jaw lathe chuck for my Compact-5/CNC lathe (5" swing) which uses a drill chuck type key to rotate the scroll plate relative to the body.

    :-)
    Then you could perhaps have gotten the story which went with the chuck. I would have liked to hear that.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I do not think so.
check this out
http://cgi.ebay.com/New-Jacobs-K5-large-chuck-key_W0QQitemZ220318912824
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
The pictures are identical to my key.
And read this:
From the Manufacturer The Jacobs K5 T-Handle Chuck Key with 7/16-Inch pilot size can be used for Jacobs 20N chuck and other compatible chucks with 7/16-Inch pilot size. The Jacobs K5 is equipped with Nickel T-Handle grip styles to increase leverage and user comfort, while the soft steel handles limit the potential for dangerous fracturing under excessive loads. Each Jacobs K5 T-Handle Handle Chuck Key includes a one year factory warranty. The Jacobs K5 Thumb Handle Chuck Key is a part of Jacobs comprehensive selection of precision crafted keys to meet any need.
Product Description Soft steel handles limit the potential for dangerous fracturing under excessive load. Self ejecting models with spring-loaded ejectors ensure key disengagement after tightening.
(soft steel handle == easy to bend to pretzel shape)

But have you seen a K5 key? I think that this is such a big chuck, and they key is simply different. I have a small collection of Jacobs chucks and keys (11N, 14N, 16N, 18N, 20N IIRC, though I may get rid of the 20N). The other keys are as you describe. But 20N is a giant chuck.
i
--
Due to extreme spam originating from Google Groups, and their inattention
to spammers, I and many others block all articles originating
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I added the picture of the original chuck to
http://igor.chudov.com/projects/misc/Anvil/03-Straightening-Chuck-Key/
and here is a visual comparison
http://igor.chudov.com/projects/misc/Anvil/03-Straightening-Chuck-Key/Compare.gif
So I stand by my assertion that the pin is original.
I know that people can fake Picasso paintings, so making a copy of this pin is not that hard, but I do not believe that it is a copy. The steel, also, seems to be not a regular mild steel.
i

--
Due to extreme spam originating from Google Groups, and their inattention
to spammers, I and many others block all articles originating
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
    [ ... ]

    O.K. I'll accept that it was from the factory this way then. I had never personally seen one with a mild steel handle. How big is this thing, anyway -- and what does it fit?
    [ ... ]

    O.K. Accepted.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I just made two more pictures of the 20N chuck, along with the key and a beer can, for size comparison.
http://igor.chudov.com/projects/misc/Anvil/03-Straightening-Chuck-Key/
So, as you can see, this chuck is quite big. The handle is modest compared to it, because the chuck is ball bearing and thus has more gripping force per foot-pound of handle tightening.
Maybe Wild Bill will now say "this is a fake beer can, anyone can make one with a lathe and a file". :)
i

--
Due to extreme spam originating from Google Groups, and their inattention
to spammers, I and many others block all articles originating
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, you made the minature beer can on your anvil and hammer. Nice paint job on the beer can though, almost looks real.... almost. :-)
RogerN
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
    [ ... ]

    That *is* an impressive chuck. What is its maximum capacity?

    But it *says* "Genuine" on the can's label. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

3/8 inch to 1 inch.
--
Due to extreme spam originating from Google Groups, and their inattention
to spammers, I and many others block all articles originating
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Again, it wasn't me that said your chuck key had a shop-made handle pin, Ig.
It seems that you would prefer to refuse to accept this, as I've said it that it wasn't me, previously.
What I commented on is that a pin with radiused ends is a simple part to make, even simpler with a lathe.
When making a pin-shaped part, I generally always choose round stock of an appropriate size, not a piece of tubing, leaf spring, square or hex stock or any number of other types of materials. I wouldn't, for example, start with a section of wire coat hanger and build up the diameter with weld or metal spray. I also wouldn't start with a piece of sheetmetal and roll it up and forge it into a pin shape.
By choosing round stock of an appropriate size, most of the work has already been completed. The task becomes a matter of cutting an appropriate lenght, and then finishing the ends. This task wouldn't take any longer than 5 minutes, most likely less time if I was trying to see how fast it could be done.
Adding a feature in the center to displace some metal would take a lot less time, so it's only a few basic metalworking skills to produce a pin for a chuck key.
When you're having another beer, be sure to have an extra one for that huge bug up your ass.
--
WB
.........
metalworking projects
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think it would take me longer than 5 minutes just to find the tooling in my shop to make it :-) Find stock, cut stock, put blade back on bandsaw, find file, find knurling tool, change over from previous setup... Get frustrated and buy a new Jacobs chuck key.
RogerN

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wuuf, sounds complicated Roger.. all ya gotta do is, get a Roomba and rework it to fetch tools (but preload it with a debit card balance in case the store trip is neccessary).
--
WB
.........
metalworking projects
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You did a good job!
Mitch

inattention
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.