12% Silicone Aluminum?

I've got a customer who has told me he will be drilling "sticky aluminum." When pressed for the spec, he said "12% silicone" which I think may actually
be 12% silicon.
Anyone know anything about this material? He wants to drill a 1/4" hole with no coolant except for maybe a vortex chiller at the highest RPM possible (non-carbide tooling!) up to around 4200 RPM.
Thoughts?
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 01.908.542.0244 Automatic / Pneumatic Drills: http://www.AutoDrill.com Multiple Spindle Drills: http://www.Multi-Drill.com Production Tapping: http://Production-Tapping-Equipment.com / Flagship Site: http://www.Drill-N-Tap.com VIDEOS:
http://www.youtube.com/user/AutoDrill
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V8013-R
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On 01/04/2011 02:41 PM, Joe AutoDrill wrote:

This is engine block material, I don't think it is real "sticky", but a bit brittle. And, DAMN abrasive, so carbide would be a good cutting tool. Peck drilling may be required, and I just don't know if cutting dry will work. I think the vortex cooler is not going to be a big help.
Jon
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I would suggest posting this question over at the Practical Machinist site. The high silicon content sounds like it may be quite abrasive, and someone there may suggest diamond or PCD tooling as being the most economical. Not the cheapest to buy, but the cheapest to operate.
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The high silicon alum will kill high speed steel, cobalt will not fare much better, you will find that, in a short amount of time, the drills will be rubbing on the flank. Then the holes will be "blown out" on the back side, because of the brittleness, and be tapered too! Coated carbide, or PCD, PCD would be better.
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Extruded tubing...
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You had to press him for the Spec? Run away. He then gave you wrong information? Run away.

Non-carbide tooling, possibly meaning he wants to do things on the cheap. Run Away.
The least expensive tool isn't the one that costs less, it's the one that gives you the lowest production unit cost.
Anthony once posted: (A390 is 17% Si) [ Depending on the Si content, I'll definitely vote PCD. Sure, they look to be expensive, but when you get into higher Si alloys, nothing else will really do. A390 alloy is one of the worst, a coated carbide Al spec 3-flute EM lasts 20-30 parts, a PCD lasts about 10,000 parts. $130+ for CC vs. $850 for PCD per tool, which is the cheaper tool per part?
Just to answer the question.... $4.33 - Coated Carbide.... $0.085 - PCD......
PCD tooling is CHEAP! Reply With Quote ]
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