Barrel Cam ideas needed.

I am building a machine for some factory automation. It will have a cam in the shape of a barrel. As the dial rotates
under it, it will drive a set of pins down into the syringe barrels underneath it. A machine similar to this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_JoMFN4myU&feature=PlayList&p
D4B0538E65897E&playnext_from=PL&index&playnext=2
The cam needed will look like this cam, visible at the 46 second mark.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v
t8P-ria44
I am thinking of having 4140 rolled into a ring, then milling out the cam portion, having it hardened.
Any advise on better ideas, what to look out for?
Thanks!
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_JoMFN4myU&feature=PlayList&p
D4B0538E65897E&playnext_from=PL&index&playnext=2
As the only area where any significant force is being developed doesn't happen to constitute anywhere near a complete 360 circle then I would say you could probably simply use a square block upon which a cam segment has been milled onto it at the "downward press" area.....( and maybe at the retract area too--but only needed there if a set of springs and a semi-solid bumper-stop won't reliably return the punches to the "up" position ).
--



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Thanks, But not sure I understand. There is no more pressure than what is needed to overcome the springs on my machine. All it needs to do is click a tiny plastic cap onto the barrel. I am thinking to harden the circular cam just to eliminate wear over millions of cycles. They want 10-13,000 parts per hour.
Not sure how to apply a square block to a round merry go round sort to of cam. ?
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Think "a curved section of the great wall of China" but built as a model-piece in a museum and mounted on top of a decorative wooden block....
Technically this would be called a ruled surface, basically an outer ring shaped section of your merry-go round after first having sliced it like a pizza but instead of a flat walkway there's a bump instead....the first component of the bump always points exactly towards the center axle while the second component rises and falls while always staying perpendicular.
Warped vinyl records also kinda starts to come to mind but problem is the second component doesn't keep a perpendicular orientation upon rise and fall but instead always points to the same point along the spindle.
--






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Cross-Slide wrote:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_JoMFN4myU&feature=PlayList&p
D4B0538E65897E&playnext_from=PL&index&playnext=2
http://www.steelforge.com/forgings/forgingchart.htm
--
John R. Carroll



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PS: You could contact Commerical Cam http://www.camcoindex.com/default.htm or Stelron Cam http://www.stelron.com/ for prices to manufacture barrel cams to your spec. There are others, I'm sure, but these are the people I've used in the past. R. Wink
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A method I use uses a thinner piece of hardenable metal that is longer than the cam path. I use some tables published by Commerical Cam to develop the path which is then cut into the metal, leaving a web at each end. Roll it to the correct radius in one piece. After rolling, cut the webs off along the axis of the radius making two pieces. Flame harden the cam surfaces after rolling and use a small high speed die grinder to correct any problem areas after mounting. You can use a thick top and bottom rib screwed to the cams to hold the radius and to provide mountings. R. Wink
On Tue, 6 Apr 2010 12:04:20 -0700 (PDT), Cross-Slide

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