Aluminum Wiring Question



I would have thought that a wealthy person such as yourself would have chosen gold-plated silver wiring... :)
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On Sun, 02 Nov 2003 17:55:04 +0000, Guy Macon <http://www.guymacon.com Gave us:>

Just raw silver is fine. The oxide protects it.
Pure silver oxide is even more conductive than silver is.
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Gave us:

aluminum
and
air.
Care to cite a reference for all of that Mr. Know-it-all gibberish? That's ok, I'll do it for you: http://www.inspect-ny.com/aluminum.htm
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On Mon, 03 Nov 2003 02:50:13 GMT, "Nukie Poo" <vze32jp7<NO

Gibberish? Fuck you. I know more about metals, joining metals, and binding metals together than you ever will. No matter where you look.
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Gave us:

That's
Translated that means: "no, I won't post any references because I don't have nor need any. I just made it all up. But that's good enough because I know everything, your reference - or any other you may find - notwithstanding."
Your true colors shine through as always! What a pathetic closed-minded ignorant individual you are. I think I'll go now and leave some dark matter in my toilet.
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On Mon, 03 Nov 2003 12:41:22 GMT, "Nukie Poo" <vze32jp7<NO

You're full of shit. I'll say it again:
Freshly cut aluminum is not in immediate danger of instant oxidation. For you to think it is, shows you to be of questionable education in that area. Deal with it. I don't need references, you do.
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Gave us:

have
know
notwithstanding."
matter
Again, translated that means: "I have no references and I'm getting really pissed that you don't accept everything I say as gospel." Sorry Mr. light bulb, your word ain't enough. BTW, when you wrote research papers in school, I bet your bibliography looked something like this:
1. DarkMatter (or whaterver your stupid name is) 2. ibid 3. ibid 4. ibid 5. ibid 6. ibid 7. ibid 8. ibid 9. ibid 10. ibid 11. ibid 12. ibid 13. ibid 14. ibid 15. ibid
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On Tue, 04 Nov 2003 03:26:04 GMT, "Nukie Poo" <vze32jp7<NO

You're a goddamned retarded usenet troll, boy.
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The funny part about this whole thing is that I just ran this question by an electrical inspector. He said it was good practice to put antioxidant on big aluminum wires, but they really don't need it and I shouldn't bother trying to fix them.
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an
Well, as with a lot of things, I find that RTFM works best. If the panel manufacturer recommends it, use it. If they say no anti-oxidant required, don't worry too much.
AFAIK, anti-oxidant isn't needed for branch circuit wiring with Al, but that is branch wiring, so there you go.
daestrom
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by
on
that
It might be worth mentioning that it is the small branch-circuit type of wiring that has earned Aluminum its' infamous reputation as a fire hazard, not the heavier-gauge feeders and services. The latter is still allowed by the NEC whereas the former is no longer in new installations.
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"Nukie Poo @verizon.net>" <vze32jp7<NO SPAM> wrote in message

bother
panel
required,
by
Could you cite a specific article, or other information disallowing small gauge Al wiring? What is the specific cut off size?
I'm not a fan of Al wire so this one must have slipped by me.
Thank you.
Louis-- ********************************************* Remove the two fish in address to respond
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question
antioxidant
but
hazard,
Louis,
I can't cite a reference because I just discovered that I am wrong, according to the 2002 NEC, Articles:
310.2 "(B) Conductor Material. Conductors in this article shall be of aluminum, copper-clad aluminum, or copper unless otherwise specified."
334.104 "Conductors.The insulated power conductors shall be sizes 14 AWG through 2 AWG with copper conductors or sizes 12 AWG through 2 AWG with aluminum or copper-clad aluminum conductors. The signaling conductors shall comply with 780.5."
The practice has been banned in our area for many years; I made an incorrect assumption that the NEC had discontinued its' approval of solid Aluminum conductors for branch circuit wiring. Thanks for making me look it up.
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"Nukie Poo @verizon.net>" <vze32jp7<NO SPAM> wrote in message

with
incorrect
If it makes you feel any better, you were correct in mobile homes, where 550.15 prohibits aluminum for branch circuits. Also, many local codes could prohibit it.
Ben Miller
--
Benjamin D. Miller, PE
B. MILLER ENGINEERING
  Click to see the full signature.
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"Nukie Poo @verizon.net>" <vze32jp7<NO SPAM> wrote in message

of
allowed
small
with
incorrect
Rats! Sounded like a good idea though!
Thank you.
Louis-- ********************************************* Remove the two fish in address to respond
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The problem was by the time they identified the problems with aluminum and got them in the (75) code the damage was done. With the new alloy and the CO/ALr devices it is really supposed to work OK. I think another thing is the 3d world is a little more stable and copper is cheaper than it was in the early 70s. When you can get a box of 12/2 copper for $15-20, why would you pay $3-4 for aluminum rated devices? In 1975 I was paying $35 for 12/2 Romex. That would be ~ $70 in today's dollar.
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"Nukie Poo

Yeah - but banned or not, can you buy Al #10 or #12 anywhere these days?
Also, on a side note - have you heard that New York State licensing now requires 11 years experience? What's up with that, if it's true?
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incorrect
Too many hacks out there. But I think the test and practical are too easy, at least in my area. I had this one newly-licensed contractor ask me in the supply house the other day what size conduit a 400amp service would require.
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It's effectively banned by 110.3(B) and 406.2(C). Listed devices are expensive, hard to find, and GFIs and dimmers are non-existent. Connectors are also a problem. There is a wire nut listed for copper to aluminum connections, but none are listed for aluminum to aluminum. "Nukie Poo @verizon.net>" <vze32jp7<NO SPAM> wrote in message

of
allowed
small
with
incorrect
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daestrom@NO_SPAM_HEREtwcny.rr.com says...

Good! Reading this thread got me thinking about my oven. I replaced the thing a couple of years ago, and of course it's wired with aluminum. I had to move the cable, so had to yank the end off to snake the cable through a new hole in the floor. There was no antioxidant, but no obvious sign of any heat or corrosion either, so I just bolted it all back together. I did check to make sure the receptacle was rated CU-AL. I hope al is kosher?
--
Keith


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