Computer VS Electrical Engineering??

Can anybody please tell me the difference between these two engineering fields? Starting next semester, I'll have to choose which field to enroll in. I
would like to know what kind of stuff I'll be learning in these two fields. Also If you can, please also indicate what kind of job will I be doing after I graduate. And the prospective job opportunities for them.
Thanks!
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On Wed, 24 Sep 2003 00:57:26 GMT, "UltimateApocalypse"

Until only about 30 years ago, there were no CSs, only EEs. The field of CS developed as EEs designed more complicated computers, and it became necessary to specialize in the niche field (CS) or in the broader field (EE). Both fields include computer programming to a significant degree.
Computer Scientists generally design computers and other digital logic devices, using especially FPGAs and ASICs. They work with VHDL and Verilog as design languages. Although a good electrical foundation is required, CSs are not necessarily expected to understand the deep electrical details about signals, propagation, and impedance. CSs tend to design the more complicated digital integrated circuits, some using many millions of transistors.
Electrical engineering covers a broad range of fields, covering DC power supplies, the national power grid, audio amplifiers, consumer electronics (radios, TVs, etc), and higher frequency radios (like cell phones and satellite systems). EEs generally use schematic diagrams as design tools, but more recently have been moving into VHDL and Verilog also. EEs are often called upon to evaluate system characteristics like stability. "Electronic EEs" tend to design the not-so-digital integrated circuits (like op-amps) and often do product implementations. The other EE fields also have their specialists.
Kevin
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wrote:

you
And
You did describe the Computer Engineering degree, but Computer Science is not an interchangeable term for it. The CS guys are actually the pure programming and algorithms group, who concentrate on crazy stuff like neural networks and databases and whatnot.
The computer engineering major is like an EE without as much focus on analog, and a pretty good low-level programming toolkit. In retrospect it would have been more fun for me, instead of the EE major.
Just wanted to make sure there was no confusion, and the poor guy doesn't end up sitting in a chaotic systems class wondering when the teacher's going to say something about VHDL!
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Greetings.
Is possible that you wrote computer science when you actually meant computer engineering (or the like)? I really don't think designing digital logic, or the other activities you described, is the bailiwick of a typical, employed CS major. Or am I mistaken?
Cordially, Richard Kanarek
On Wed, 24 Sep 2003 03:29:13 GMT, Kevin Kilzer

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snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com says...

You're confusing CS (Computer Science) with CompE (Computer Engineering). CompE is pretty much a specialization within EE, much like power or RF. It's just sexier for the colleges to have a different department name. ;-)

The difference is that CompEs design computers and EEs design "other digital logic", *sometimes* using FPGAs and ASICs. High-end computers/microprocessors are generally full custom designs and not really ASICs (and certainly not FPGAs).

I disagree here completely. It's pretty hard to design a computer/microprocessor without paying attention to these "details". Signal propagation and power distribution is a huge part of computer design. A computer engineer may have a different emphasis, to be sure. An architect (generally a computer engineer, or an EE with a lot of computer engineering experience) will be doing things like analyzing the trade-offs between cache sizes, organization, and speeds, for instance. While the cache designer (could be a CompE or EE) will certainly have to understand the "deep electrical details".

Sure, EE is a very broad field, which really includes CompE. In fact I intentionally went EE angle and took all the course work that a CompE degree required. I then sold myself as both. I think this is still a valid strategy, though perhaps dual degree is even a better idea these days. You can then go after either position.
--
Keith

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I posted that same question here once and got helpful responses. I just got accepted to a 4 year school as a junior, and it's time to make my decision. I'm leaning towards EE. I like computers too but there are also other areas I'm interested in, such as wireless communications. My school has a CE program, it's basically a computer science degree with a little more math and science, plus a course in electrical systems.
Matt
wrote:

If you

And
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mcollins snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

Congratulations! That says a lot right there!

That's scary! What college? To do anything as a Computer Engineer you really have to be well grounded in the basics of EE. A BSCS plus a course is not going to cut it!
Perhaps there is a difference in terms. Computer Engineers have traditionally dealt with hardware concepts. Computer Science types are more on the software/algorithm side. There is a vast difference, at least at the BS level. The line starts to get fuzzy at the PhD level though. If you're interested in something you might be able to touch, go the EE route!
Again, I'd bite the bullet and go for the EE and use whatever credits you have spare to take the CS or CE courses. Take another semester/year (depending on the economic environment - grab a job when available) to do both. Flexability is key now, as it was thirty years ago. The more things change...
Good luck Matt, and work your A$$ off. It'll pay you back with big interest in the long run.
--
Keith


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It's the University of South Florida in Tampa. You're right, there are some hardware electives now that I look at it, but it does share a lot of courses with computer science.
Matt

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mcollins snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

Do the EE and take take all the CompE electives you can. If you're paying by the semester (rather than credit), even audit as many as you can. I believe a CompE BS (form other than a *top* school) is rather worthless right now. An EE is a much better idea and if you can show computer competency, all the better.
The next suggestion is to find a company to coop with. If you can land a coop deal you'll have a 10x better chance of getting a job when you graduate. Even in bad times we've hired the good coops.
--
Keith

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remove the urine to answer
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us:

Now, ask the total idiot to name the seven layers.
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snipped-for-privacy@thebarattheendoftheuniverse.org says...

The Sacrament of Baptism The Sacrament of Pennance The Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist The Sacrament of Confirmation (Chrisimation) The Sacrament of Matramony (Marriage) The Sacrament of Holy Orders The Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick
...or do you know how to spell OSI, DimBulb? I do believe the above would be more useful to you.
--
Keith

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On Fri, 26 Sep 2003 22:43:10 -0400, Keith R. Williams
Snipped retarded baby bullshit.

Like I said... You are obsolete.
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says...

Wehn I graduated (30ish years ago) the difference was five-six courses difference between an EE and CompE BS. There were plenty of major-elecitves and free electives to cover these. I also did a few analog courses and "special problems" (one-on-one projects with a sponsoring professor). Diversification is key to survival.
--
Keith

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On Fri, 26 Sep 2003 22:40:59 -0400, Keith R. Williams

You are obsolete. Wehn? Right now, dipshit.
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snipped-for-privacy@thebarattheendoftheuniverse.org says...

Perhaps, though for the rest of your life you're going to be a wannabe. I do believe that my thirty years experience trumps your wannabeism. Good grief! Anyone who has such a low-level knowledge of thermo and EM radiation cannot have graduated from a decent high school, much less an engineering school!

DimBulb once again shows his mental capability.
--
Keith

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On Wed, 24 Sep 2003 00:57:26 GMT, "UltimateApocalypse"

CS pays... EE doesn't. CS is a cushy job... EE is bust yer ass all day job.

You should already have a great deal of familiarity with both. If you are merely choosing an engineering discipline because you like the idea, but have no current grasp, you are probably in for a let down.
The math alone in today's curriculum for EITHER one is VERY VERY high level stuff.

You should probably already have an idea on this one as well.

In this current economy?!!! Hahahah... Lot od electrician jobs listed... not many engineering jobs listed, and that includes the IT professions.
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Computer engineering is computer oriented with some generic system design theory. Electrical is more general, dealing with everything that has to do with electricity, including computer hardware and a little programming .There exist much overlap when dealing with computers and the lines can blur. The best bet is to look at the courses involved in 3rd & 4th year, and talk with the professors who teach courses that you think may be interesting. This is the best way to do it as some course outline have not been updated in 30 years (too much paperwork for the prof).

you
And
You may be thinking backwards, you should determine the industry or industries that you're interested in. From there determine whether a BSc. EE or BSc. CE is best. Finally nothing beats experience, if you're an electrical engineer with hardcore computer experience you will beat out a computer engineer who has no experience for a computer eng based job (or vise versa).
Dwayne MSc. EE
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Those info you guys provided are really helpful. I agree with what Keith said, and I'll probably go for EE and then get a second degree in CE since I like computers quite a lot. I just talked to my profs today. What I heard was that I only have to take a few more courses to get a CE degree if I have a EE degree already. However, it does not work the other way around because EE courses cover more detailed and in depth material than CE courses. So I think go for EE first then get CE would be the best bet.
Thanks!
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Do you think of a computer as a tool to accomplish some other goal or do you find it so fascinating that you would like to devote all of your initial time and energy to messing with it. I think of them as a tool (and one that is frequently broken or locked up). I went EE with a specialty in Computers. But that was due to the way I answered the first question..
Good Luck

you
And
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