Electrical conductivity in steel wire ?

try it and see, might work.


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grumpyoldhori wrote:

You have some options open to you, which could be used in combination. 1) Use all 7 wires - one group of 3 in parallel for 1 side of the supply, and the remaing 4 in parallel for the other side of the supply. That will reduce losses in the wire. 2) Reduce the current drawn by the device(s) at the top of the hill, if possible. 3) Use higher voltage AC as the source and step it down, rectify and regulate at the top of the hill. 4) Use batteries at the top of the hill and charge them from the source at the end at the bottom. #4 is viable only if the load at the top of the hill draws current intermittently. Even then, you would need to determine if on time versus off time allows the battery to recharge at whatever charge rate the setup would allow.
Ed
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ehsjr wrote:

What about adding a solar panel to option 4? Solar powered fencers are getting to be fairly common. Even if the panel can't keep up the battery wouldn't have to be exchanged as often for a fully charged one.
Dean
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On Sun, 27 Apr 2008 05:06:05 GMT, ehsjr

Why not just crank up the voltage at the bottom of the hill until you get 12 at the top, using all the wires like EHS suggested
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No. 8 has a diameter of 0.1285 inches. 0.1285 inches is 128.5 thousandths of an inch. CMA is 128.5 squared or 16512 circualr mils. The distance of 500 meters = 500 x 3.28 feet = 1640 feet Load = 0.5 amperes VD=2KLI/CMA K or circular mil ohms per foot for galvanized soft steel wire is not easy to find, but 95.8 at 20 degrees C is given by one standard. This is about 9 times that of copper that is 10.371 for 20 degrees C. VD=2(95.8)(1640)(0.5)/16512 VD=9.5 volts This is a voltge drop of 9.5/12 x 100 or 79 percent.
To achieve a voltage drop of 5 percent maximum: 0.05 x 12 = 0.6 volts CMA= 2KLI/VD CMA = 2(95.8)(1640)(0.5)/0.6 CMA=261,853 which is about the size of a 250 Kcmil conductor. This assumes a low temperature of 20 degrees C. which is 68 degrees F. Voltage drop at room temperature will be more. Therefore, No 8 the steel wire cannot be used without having too high of a voltage drop.
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