generator

hi,
storm comming!!!! this friday.
i have a honda 11hp 6850 max 5500 norm gen.
what do you think of this set up
-put in a 220v 30 amp breaker in home panel & wire it to another 30 amp
disconnect thats tied to a female recepticle for the generator plug.
--if power fails pull the main & turn off all breakers
--close the 30amp breaker on the main panel & close the disconnect.
--fire up the generator & plug it in.slowly turning on only essential
breakers.(conservatively not to exceed gen. rating)
**** how does this affect the load on the left & right poles of the
generator if theyre not balanced?
In otherwords I have 2 lives 1 neutral & a ground tied & isolated to my gen.
if the left side of my panel (120v) draws more than the right will that
affect the gen.? or as in theory it all comes back to source and
balances.....I think.
Feedback appreciated
but not backfeed(haha)
Robert
Reply to
Rob
Loading thread data ...
hey guys.... a disconnect is a manual trow over switch....sorry for the confusion. Robert
Reply to
Rob
Why don't you just do it right? Hey, you asked here.
Your generator cord, if I understand what you are doing, is called a suicide cord for a reason. And there is nothing to prevent backfeeding.
Reply to
BG
I agree with BG, do it right. It will keep you from killing yourself or the poor lineman working in your area. Get a manual transfer switch from an electrical supply store.
Charles Perry P.E.
Reply to
Charles Perry
You miss the point. 1) Your disconnect will energize your circuit breaker panel without disconnecting the panel from the utility lines. 2) The cord you intend to use will have male plugs at each end. (Thus the name "suicide cord")
Both of the above are unsafe.
Reply to
ehsjr
As a slight aside, I find it really interesting that you can even *suggest* such a wiring scheme over there - let alone actually do it.
In Oz/NZ, any modifications to a domestic switchboard to fit a generator connection *must* be done by a licensed electrician *and* inspected by the local power authority.. and then your insurance company will disown you before you can turn the power back on to your house! I guess that's to prevent Joe Householder killing himself...
Cameron:-)
Reply to
Cameron Dorrough
Rob, you said, "if power fails pull the main & turn off all breakers".
The changeover from normal supply to generator supply must be mechanically interlocked such that it is not *physically* possible to connect the generator to the utility - even by accident.
Cameron:-)
Reply to
Cameron Dorrough
Robert Since you are back feeding the panel through a breaker that is not interlocked with the main breaker you should use a double break technique. After you open the main you should have the the meter pulled or If you are comfortable doing it then pull it your self. Have a meter blank on hand to keep the rain out of the meter enclosure.
Alternatively you could buy a shunt trip equipped breaker to use as your generator disconnect. Attach the shunt trip leads to the line side of the main breaker so the generator breaker will open itself when public power returns.
If your panel is a recent SquareD unit there is a mechanical interlock available that will interlock the main with your generator breaker in positions 2/4. -- Tom
Reply to
Tom Horne
No, I am not missing main breaker off - I read the first post. Now, re-read what I posted: "1) Your disconnect will energize your circuit breaker panel without disconnecting the panel from the utility lines."
Your disconnect is not mechanically connected to your main breaker. Therefore, your disc"--if power fails pull the main & turn off all breakers" You are indicating that YOU (or some person) will pull the main. The DISCONNECT will not do it.
You came here asking what people thought of your idea: "what do you think of this set up" People are trying to tell you what they think, but you are missing it.
What you need is a TRANSFER SWITCH, not a DISCONNECT. The setup, as you described it, is unsafe for the reasons already posted. A transfer switch guarantees that the utility lines cannot become energized by the generator. Forget to pull the main in your method, and those lines can become energized.
Reply to
ehsjr
People actually do far worse that what has only been suggested here, in spite of our rules to the contrary. I imagine its the same in Oz/NZ - but your rules may have "more teeth". I imagine someone here may have gone to jail for violating the electrical code, but I've never heard of it. People have died due to shoddy and illegal wiring.
Reply to
ehsjr
If you forget to turn main breaker off, or if someone else turns it back on, you will energize the lines leading to the distribution pole and there will be 7200 Volts waiting for an unsuspecting linesman. bad idea. Better to pull the meter and hardwire into the meter box if you don'r want to buy a manual transfer switch.
Rob wrote:
Reply to
**THE-RFI-EMI-GUY**
Unfortunately, a lot of people die from shoddy and illegal wiring over here too :-( You should see some of the reports we get from Insurance Companies - it's amazing the things people will try to get away with.
..but the "line in the sand" is drawn pretty close to the incoming supply lines and anyone *actually caught* tampering with their utility supply is drawn slowly over hot coals by the Utility first and everyone else second..
On the positive side, they only do it once.
Cameron.
Reply to
Cameron Dorrough
I would never forget to open the main breaker in this case. Are there people out there that would or have? Alos I would block it open via mechanical interlock.
Thanks for beating me up! Rob
Reply to
Rob
I'm sure you wouldn't.. at least not intentionally, and Yes there are. Electrical wiring must be safe enough to be fool-proof. If someone else decided to hook up the generator whilst you were away somewhere and they killed themselves (as they have) you (as the designer/installer/owner) would get locked up. How would that make you feel??
No problem!.. We are happy to oblige. ;-)
Cameron:-)
Reply to
Cameron Dorrough
Rob I don't think that most people would call what I said a verbal beeting. The stakes are teribly high. Outside wiremen have been killed by generator back feeds. What most folks are trying to do here is to warn you of that danger. -- Tom
Reply to
Tom Horne
They oughta make cheaper transfer switches. I mean make transfer switches less expensive. The switches I have seen in Grainger's are ridiculously priced. IMHO MLM
Reply to
john Q pubic
One of the problems in designing transfer switches, is there is no way to guarantee they are only operated without any load. If this could be ensured, something on the order of a simple knife-switch could work. But since it may be carrying full load, it must be able to safely and *repeatedly* interrupt rated current (perhaps 100 - 200 amps). Something a little harder than your average light-switch ;-)
daestrom
Reply to
daestrom
The problem here it that the transfer switch performs a critical, fail-safe function and must therefore be of the very best quality construction. Sadly, this quality doesn't come cheap (although I've often wished it did).
Still the bottom line is that you cannot allow quality to be compromised when life safety is involved, which it is in this case.
Harry C.
Reply to
Harry Conover
Rob I don't think that most people would call what I said a verbal beeting. The stakes are teribly high. Outside wiremen have been killed by generator back feeds. What most folks are trying to do here is to warn you of that danger. -- Tom
Reply to
Tom Horne

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