how to bypass dremel tool internal variable speed control?

snipped-for-privacy@crackasmile.org says...


Our "short-bus kitty" (Louis) just went to the vet for a checkup, shots, and drugs for the move. He tilted the scales at 26#. He's a Maine-Coon X mutt, monster. He doesn't like his belly rubbed either, but will just leave. The other one is an all-black, all-American short-hair. He's the one with the attitude issues.

He's de-clawed, but the backs are their real weapons. The fronts are just for show.

"Thunder" does it for play. He'll roll over and put his paws in the air, right in front of you, and stretch . He's cute, but what he really wants is for you to put your arm where he can grab and shred it.
--
Keith

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On Mon, 15 Oct 2007 21:17:04 -0400, Joseph Gwinn

Its easy to interview them. However...if they dont like you, or get bored...they wont tell you shit.
Gunner

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snipped-for-privacy@example.net says...

Hardly. It's good practice to honor your master.
--
Keith

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Oh boy! RichTard knows some really big words.
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krw wrote:

One of the problems with blowing out electronics with high pressure air is the ultrasonic vibrations that are set up by the air. The vibrations can break the fine junctions on the chip itself.
John
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John wrote:
<snip>

Huh? A standard cleaning protocol involved immersion in an ultrasonic freon bath, now replaced by other less-inert solvents; this involved considerably more sonic power than that produced by an air nozzle. Certainly one must exercise care when cleaning around delicate parts such as fine-wire coils without encapsulation, paper parts, etc., but by and large there is little risk in pressurized air cleaning (120 psi) and IMHO the benefits far outweigh any small risks. I've been doing it for far more years than I care to admit with excellent results on industrial, military and consumer electronics. I have also had very good results using high-pressure hot detergent and water for difficult greasy accumulations; the cleaner is much like a dentist's tool or a 'Water Pic' rather than the familiar domestic pressure washer.
The key in wet cleaning of electronics is a proper bake-out protocol to insure that parts (such as transformers) with high-potential connections are dry internally to prevent breakdown before applying power.
Regards,
Michael
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msg wrote:

On older circuit boards when ic's were first introduced it was not recommended to use high pressure air on the boards. One of the main failure points on early chips was the bonding of the leads to the chip. This has since been solved but I still remember having boards fail after they were blown off with high pressure air.
John
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john wrote:
<snip>

Interesting. What package types were susceptible to this (or did it matter)? Metal can TO-x ICs seemed to be the most reliable (RTL, HLL, some DTL, etc.) but I found a lot of early ceramic packages suffered from bad seals and permitted fungi to enter and grow inside (this in equipment that had never been wet, just from operating environmental conditions). These parts seemed also to lack proper passivation internally.
Regards,
Michael
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msg wrote:

The ceramic Ic's were supposed to be more reliable but in fact as you said they had a higher failure rate. The sealant that they used was not too good since in many instances the tops would come off the IC . I bet the sealant was probably a little corrosive too.
The first generation of IC's had a very high failure rate in compared to todays products. They were very heat sensitive and would act up above 100 degrees F even though the rating was higher. If I found one bad ic I would just change out every IC on the whole board that had the same date code and install a second generation ic with the same number. On some equipment you would automaticly change out a couple of parts and it was fixed. One company insisted on using the cheapest parts available but their advertising sold a lot of equipment in spite of the poor reliablity of the product. Today ic's and transistors , other than high power transistors, almost never fail unless something external blows them out. The industry has come a long way since the fifties when I first started in electronics.
John
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Silver filled epoxy is the main chip bonding media. The air must be evacuated from it in proper use. The surface of it will "tarnish" after application.
We use "humiseal" on our applications.

Epoxies have come a long way since the sixties.

Don't know if I would have gone that far, but whatever.

The first IC chips were in the sixties. TI made them for Fairchild, and they went into missiles. Ten transistor elements.
Now, we have 200 Million plus transistor elements on a single die.
I think we are doing pretty good..
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Air is also capable of introducing an ESD event. The tribo-electric effect.
Air is an insulator. Drag molecules of it across an isolated device (read blow), be it conductor or otherwise, and it WILL gain charge. Touch to ground, and there is a discharge.
Nearly every "air station" one will find in a proper electronics manufacturing facility will be at an ESD, properly grounded workstation so that such discharges only occur at a slow rate. The "air tool" operator is also supposed to remain grounded through a properly constructed ESD grounding system. Either heal straps on an ESD matting or floor set-up, or wrist or smock strap versions.
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ChairmanOfTheBored wrote:

For real people that is a heel strap. You, on the other hand...
--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
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On Mon, 08 Oct 2007 04:18:09 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

Spelling lames? Hahahah... You're a joke, boy.
Try to stay on topic... wait.. you would have to actually know what is going on to do that...
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ChairmanOfTheBored wrote:

No, you are the joke, and a consistently lame speller. You love to point it out when others make mistakes, yet continue to make your own.
--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
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On Fri, 05 Oct 2007 00:24:43 GMT, "James Sweet"

Au contraire, mon frere... ;-) It's still relevant.
You have to evict the dust bunnies from inside the gear before you can start fixing it. And what's the easiest way to do it?...

Build a sound cover around it that buts up to the wall. Plywood box with acoustic ceiling tiles glued to the inside, and make a labyrinth channel vent on top for air circulation that is also lined with acoustic tile - air goes through, sound bounces off the walls and dies.
If you really seal it tight to the wall and floor, put a second labyrinth trap down low with a muffin fan or two for air flow.
--<< Bruce >>--
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Spend a

My $12 die grinder calls for 1-2 drops of oil per use, I've never seen oil come out of it Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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    [ ... ]

    Ouch!
    [ ... ]

    I certainly do. :-)
    Hmm ... this is cross-posted to the following newsgroups:
        sci.electronics.basics         sci.electronics.repair         rec.crafts.metalworking         alt.engineering.electrical
Of those, the third (rec.crafts.metalworking) is likely to have a very *high* percentage of readers who own an air compressor. The reply suggesting a pneumatic die grinder probably came from someone in RCM who did not notice the other newsgroups in the cross-posting, so it was reasonable to expect that an air compressor would be present.

    I forget what the application was for the Dremel (somewhere upthread) so I don't know whether the oil is a problem or not. If working on metal, I would suggest that the oil is probably a benefit, not a problem.
    If oil is a problem, I would second the suggestion for a Foredom. Note that not only does it have a fairly hefty flexible shaft, but for smaller tools (e;g. what a Dremel would be comfortable driving) there is a handpiece with a short very flexible shaft just before it which makes precise hand control a lot easier.          I use an ancient Foredom with the extra flexible handpiece for tuning English concertina reeds, with a Dremel foot pedal for speed control, from a near total stop (needed on the tiny reeds at the upper end of the collection in a typical concertina) to near full speed (for the lowest pitch reeds).
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
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Sorry not to reply to this directly, I don't seem to have the original.
If you're interested in making PCBs have you looked at the mailing list "homebrew snipped-for-privacy@yahoogroups.com" and their archives?
--
Stuart Winsor

From is valid but subject to change without notice if it gets spammed.
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Of course it's not gonna be a pot, it would have to be far too big and burn up a lot of power. Instead they use what is essentially a light dimmer. The semiconductor you see is a triac, the diode is a diac to trigger it, if you just jumper together the right two pins on the triac, the motor will be forced on.
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Don' it just hurt to the core, James ... ? !!! ;~)
Arfa
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