Dremel tool?

Hi everyone, I am considering buying one of these Dremel tools... Any suggestions about which one could be the best to work with plasticard and resin.... I think
could be useful for some extremely elaborated projects in which sanding and cutting have to be made extensively... I guess the variable speed is important....
Thanks in advance,
Ferdy
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I have 2 of them, a regular 110AC variable speed unit and a look-alike from WalMart for $24 thats battery operated (2 spd), comes with charger, Mini-Mite I think its called. I use the former for bigger jobs and the latter or smaller stuff where a cord just gets in the way. Excellent tools for model ship building.
Nando wrote:

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It probably depends on whether you have uses for the tool outside of the hobby. My experience is limited to the Mini-Mite, which I've found to be extremely effective with all forms of material. I haven't missed the larger corded variation at all, as far as I can tell. Given the clutter on my bench, it's just as well. Nor have I missed variable speed control--the 5000 rpm setting works just fine with a little practice and a steady hand. My use might not be representative, as I work on a lot of vacuforms, conversions and limited run kits, all of which tend to require a lot of fairly gross prep work at the start. I do use the Mini-Mite for a fair amount of intermediate and finish work as well.
Mark Schynert
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Ferdy
Whichever Dremel you get make sure to get the drill press a swell. Great for the occasional shaky hand.
I guess the new ones all have a chuck. The older model that I have has the different cotlets, a pain in the ass!
Definately variable speed and practice away with it. Powerful tool, be careful.
Tom
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Don't forget to look at the one that will take a flex shaft. I use my flex shaft attached more than I use the tool without it (much better control IMO).
Woody
Nando wrote:

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Flex Shaft is awesome! I use it all of the time too.
Ralph

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In general, even the variable speed model is too fast for polystyrene, and tends to melt the plastic. Some folks buy a constant speed version and a Dremel rheostat to back down the speed as low as 100-200 RPM. Note- this will not work with the variable speed version. Tom Dougherty ( snipped-for-privacy@aol.com)
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A common misconception, you can use the Dremel speed control on the multispeed tools, the trick is to set the tool itself on it's highest speed and leave it there.
Ives100 wrote:

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personally i find the batt operated mighty mite to be the exact thing needed: you really have to work to get it to melt plastic even on high speed. its very forgiving and easy to use and will get into tight corners fairly easily. i dont know how i got along without it to tell the truth...nothing can help to make last minute, in situ corrections that i often find necessary.
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I use a multispeed plug in model with a speedcontrol and flex shaft, works for me just fine.
jah bill wrote:

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Just wanted to thank everyone for the suggestions. Here in Italy they have two types of Dremel tools only. One goes as low 5000 rpm and the other only as low as 10.000 (!). I will try to find a different similar tool which has a slower speed as recommended... Otherwise the one with 5000 will be fine. But now at least I know It will be a useful buy!
Tx again
Fernando
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Ives100 wrote:

I use an old sewing machine foot operated speed control to slow down my Dremels. This leaves both hands free to do the work.
Bob Boudreau Canada
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Dremel makes a slower-speed, cordless version that I've found perfect for working on plastic, resin, and metal. I think it's called the micro-something or other. It's lightweight, easy to use, and I haven't run across a job that it couldn't handle. The only downside might be that I don't think it fits into the Dremel drill press apparatus.
---Scott
Nando wrote:

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I'm going to be really boring and warn against the dangers of using a Dremel on resin. OK do it, but make sure you wear a dust mask! Resin dust produced by sanding with a high speed tool like the Dremel is nasty stuff.
Regards JP

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Don't overlook the equally competent, and often cheaper, Ryobi. While I liked my Dremel Mini-Mite, I *love* my Ryobi variable speed corded w/flex shaft! All bits are interchangeable. -- C.R. Krieger (Been there, rotated that)
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