Dremel: Nice Tool

Do to the apparent overwhelming positive response, I thought it would be nice to change the title of this thread :-) We have used them for many, many years,
have had some rebuilt by Dremel. Great for cutting track.
Don Cardiff Model Railroad Design Kaneville, IL
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Still have my first one. Its got to be about 35 years old. It works fine but I use my second one most as it has variable speeds. I wouldn't want to be without one. Bruce

nice
years,
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I use a double-gang box with a light dimmer in one side wired up to a duplex plug. Works great for 4 years now.
Jay CNS&M Wireheads of the world, unite!
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JCunington wrote:

What sort of duty cycle? No overheating of the dimmer or the Dremel? I guess it's a small enough motor not to bother a little SCR device like that.
How does it do at slow speeds, say on plastic?
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Bruce Favinger wrote:

I have a variable speed (model 365?) that is almost 30 years old. My only complaint is the minimum speed is too fast for some work.
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Don Cardiff wrote: Due to the apparent overwhelming positive response, I thought it would be nice to change the title of this thread :-) We have used them for many, many years, have had some rebuilt by Dremel. Great for cutting track. Don Cardiff Model Railroad Design Kaneville, IL ------------------------------------------------- Yep! One of my favorite tools. I have a corded Dremel and I purchased a rechargeable Mini-Mite with my Father's Day money last year. I find that the Mini-Mite is fine for light-duty use and close quarters.
Bill Bill's Railroad Empire N Scale Model Railroad: http://www.billsrailroad.net Brief History of N Scale: http://www.billsrailroad.net/history/n-scale Resources: Links to over 700 helpful sites: http://www.billsrailroad.net/bills-favorite-links Bookstore: http://www.billsrailroad.net/bookstore.html
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (CBT2000) wrote in message

'''''''''''''''''''''''''''' Hi Don,
Do you use a special cutting disc you've found works well on the Dremel for cutting rail? I've used the "standard" reddish/brown one in the past but it seems to shatter way to easily. Was wondering if there was a less "explosive" alternative.
Also, Micro-Mark has a snap on, clear plastic safety shield for the Dremel which I picked up many months ago in one of my rare Micro-Mark purchase frenzies. Haven't tried it out yet so can't comment either way.
BTW, where in Illinois is Kaneville? I'm in the LaSalle/Peru area about 90 miles southwest of Chicago, 60 miles northeast of Peoria.
Take care,
Paul - "The CB&Q Guy" (Proto-lancing the Burlington's Illiniwek River Branch in HO)
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Paul K - The CB&Q Guy wrote:

I discovered their heavy duty cutting wheels (#420) many years ago, and have used them every since. They are about twice as thick as the thinner ones (#409) and last a lot longer. They will shatter too, so I always wear safety glasses when using them.
Bob Boudreau Canada
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The curtting discs will withstand only the lightest transverse pressure. I have used them in that fashion with decent success -- only broke a couple. My problem is with the tool design.

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I double up the smaller disks when I can, this seems to make them last longer.
You need a smooth firm grip when using the cutting disks, any twisting will break the disks.
-Hudson
--
http://www.skypoint.com/~hudsonl

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Even better than the above is the fibre cutting wheel. It has several advantages (although it is dearer).
I haven't shattered one yet even though I have worn it down to less than 1/2 inch diamater.
Larger diameter so able to approach some jobs more square.
Can tolerate sideways pressure although this accellerates the wear rate.
I only use the carborundum disks for fine finishing now.
Peter M
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TW10 wrote:

Larger kerf, too, more to fill if you're cutting gaps, but I do like the fiberglass wheels also.
Regarding the problem of the motor getting in the way of making 90 degree cuts with the smaller, thinner wheels: I don't have a flex shaft tool (not sure they make one for my old model), so could anyone who has one and has used the carborundum disks for gapping comment on the clearance for achieving 90 degree cuts? How about the same with the cordless unit?
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(not
The head of the flex shaft is about 1/2" in diameter. The smallest cordless unit, the Mini-Mite, is very slightly thinner than my corded Multi-Pro, but not enough to make much difference while cutting track. The flex shaft is a big help at getting a 90-degree cut, and it is much easier to keep the angle consistent, so you break fewer disks.
Mark Alan Miller
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Paul K - The CB&Q Guy wrote:

I prefer the large saw blade (1.25") with fine teeth to the "cutoff disks". The blade is thinner so I don't end up with wheels dropping into the crevices as are created by the cut off disks. Also since it is bigger diameter making a 90 degree cut to a large flush surface is much easier. I have never shattered one like the cut off disks but worn several of them out. I don't think Dremel makes them any more but another company does (don't remember the name) and they can be found at any ACE hardware store.
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Paul , I've used the red cut off discs quite often , but they do break VERY easy unless you use a very steady hand. I've been geting the heavy duty ones and although they don't cut as fast they hold up much better. They will do some pretty heavy work. A while back I was changing shocks on my car and the bolts were seized to the mount. I used the red cut off discs and to my surprise it made very short work of cutting them off.....but like you said they shatter so easily. Thanks for the tip on the guard from Micro Mark
Ken Day
Ken Day On 6 Oct 2003 21:36:38 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@insightbb.com (Paul K - The CB&Q Guy) wrote:

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