how to bypass dremel tool internal variable speed control?



Well you need an air compressor for one of those, a tool relatively few people own. I use a pneumatic die grinder occasionally, but it's louder than my Dremel and it spews out a bit of oil in use.
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Well that would defeat the purpose of the oil in the first place, which is squirted into the tool to lubricate the air motor. Perhaps you're referring to the high speed air turbine tools? Either way unless you already have the compressor as I did, an electric tool is far cheaper and is not tethered to a big heavy noisy piece of equipment.
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says...

Tethered? I plumbed my house[*] for air. ;-)
[*] Places I'd likely use air tools.
--
Keith

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They all need a little oil, but most people tend to over-do it and it gets a bit messy. Only needs a drop or two a day, for light duty. (Or they forget to oil them, and the tool dies a quick death.)
You can install an inline mist oiler on your workbench outlet that you use the air tools at. But then you have to be REALLY careful not to mix your hoses used with oiled air with your 'clean' hoses, or you'll go to paint something and wreck a paint job getting oil (residue from inside the hoses) into the paint.

For a proper compressor: Big, yes. Noisy, not really, if you buy a proper belt-drive unit where the compressor is turning under 800 RPM or so. The little 3450 RPM direct drive pancake compressors are not enough to run a die grinder for any usable duty time, they make more noise than they do air.
I have the "5 HP" (really a 4, but it's enough) Husky (Campbell Hausfeld) 2-stage 80 gallon, and it's not noisy at all when running. The fancier compressors from Ingersoll-Rand and Quincy are even quieter and will run practically forever (even if used a lot), but you pay a heck of a premium for a few Db's.
And I have the lumber and a solid-core door to build a little closet around the unit, that will make it virtually silent - just need a small vent fan before I start enclosing it, so it doesn't cook itself if run for long periods...

Don't forget to put an outlet under the eaves or on the backside of a framed "chimney", so the roofers have a convenient place to plug in. Did you ever notice that you can get nice recessed "wall hydrants" for water faucets outdoors, but nobody makes them for air?
Or a flush plate-mountable air QD fitting that would look good inside a house? I'm just going to put the air-line drop in the front closet, and paint the pipe when I'm done.
--<< Bruce >>--
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.invalid says...

Because air doesn't freeze, break pipes, and otherwise cause a huge mess?
Making the roofer's job easy isn't my intent and I certainly don't want to climb up on the roof to install/service an air connection that I'll never use. OTOH, we're thinking about building a house. If we end up going that way, I was considering an air connection inside every closet (hidden, but accessible). Running the lines in open walls is easy enough.

I don't think they have to look all that good of you just tuck them in closets alongside the door opening. No one will see them there so they don't even need to be painted. I have one in an outside closet (outside the front door, where the entrance panel is), just because it was a convenient place to run a line from the basement to the garage.
--
Keith

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I have a QC below the brickwork above a basement window, 100' of hose will reach anywhere on the property/house. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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snipped-for-privacy@rogers.com says...

You have a small lot. ;-) Dragging 100' of hose around is a PITA though. I never used more than 40' to side my garage and the compressor is in the basement.
--
Keith

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    [ ... ]

    The big and heavy I would agree with for any compressor adequate to drive a die grinder, but *noisy*? It may be that you have the wrong air compressor. The oilless ones tend to be *very* noisy, but the oil wetted ones, with a belt drive from the motor to the compressor tends to be very quiet in comparison. Yes, there are bursts of chugging from time to time, but no problem from my point of view at least. I would not have one of the oilless ones in my shop.
    As for heavy -- I just installed a reel fed hose on the ceiling to allow me to reach any place in the shop where I am likely to need air. Someday, I will probably plumb it for drops near each likely place of use.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Ah crap, I didn't notice the crossposting until now, I won't keep this thread going beyond this, I thought I was only replying to sci.electronics.repair which is something that rarely requires air.
I do have an oiled belt drive reciprocating compressor, it's a LOT quieter than the oilless junk but it's still quite loud. Part of the problem is where it sits in the corner, the sound is amplified and echos.
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James Sweet wrote:
<snip>

Not to sound trollish, but one of my pet peeves is the lack of compressed air capability in electronics (and formerly computer) repair shops; cleanliness is next to godliness in equipment maintenance and for shops not to at least use compressed air to clean dirty customer gear is to me unconscionable (when needed I would expect hot high-pressure non-ionic detergent cleaning as well).
Our regional Tektronix repair depot _routinely_ hot-washed and baked instruments that were brought in for repair.
Regards,
Michael
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msg@_cybertheque.org_ says...

Static electricity and electronics don't mix, not to mention breaking things. Using a compressor to blow out computers may do more harm than good.

Quite a different thing, though I wouldn't do this either, unless the equipment was made for it.
--
Keith

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I do it all the time, never had an issue with it. One thing I have learned though is to stay away from optical drives with the air, more than once I've stirred up dust which settled in and ruined the optics.
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I've handled CMOS devices with bare hands/no straps too, but the plural of anecdote isn't data. The fact is that moving air will get a charge. If the conditions are right you can zap something.
The other problem with the high pressure/volume of a shop compressor is physical damage. Unless you're a pig, such things shouldn't be necessary.
--
Keith

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Never heard of a pressure regulator? 15psi air won't damage anything, and except in desert conditions moisture is generally more of a problem with shop air than static charge.
--
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clare, at, snyder.on.ca wrote:

I suppose you've never heard of a special nozzle made for electronics. It has a radioactive isotope to prevent static problems. Microdyne leased two of them for the production floor, because the manufacturer didn't sell them.
Central Florida isn't a desert, but I suppose you've never seen a commercial air compressor with a dryer?
--
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Rich Grise wrote:

If it's that humid in the plant, you have way too many problems with the reflow ovens and toombstoning.
--
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I guess most of us have handled CMOS in this fashion, and I did so myself until made aware that failure rates of such treated equipment was much higher than good procedure.
As a test, I directly applied standard 5kv 1/50 impulses to 800 PIV diodes, and found that it was simple to get measurable change in characteristic, but usually took several applications to produce an actually unuseable diode.
So the warning is there, that you may not stop the device from working, but it may not be the same as when the manufacturer provided it to you, and certainly I would safely guarantee that any change will not be for an improvement..
Peter Dettmann
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Not when they plug into the wall, and have no permanent magnets in them or no energized field coils.
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Can't see as it would be worse than canned air Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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| Gerald Miller wrote: |> krw wrote: |> Static electricity and electronics don't mix, not to mention breaking |> things. Using a compressor to blow out computers may do more harm |> than good.
| Can't see as it would be worse than canned air
Much worse. What creates the static electricity is the relatively long path of the air using a compressor (length of the hose and or pipe). Canned air is very short, and static electricity has hardly any time to be generated. _____________________________________Gerard S.
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