Question about Door Bell Wiring

I need a second doorbell in the garage shop. There is only one button (at the front door). The transformer is in the garage where I need the second bell and only
has 2 wires connected to it.
I would like to avoid fishing wires and use a simple buzzer connected in series directly to the transformer.
Can this work? I was hoping that a buzzer will not draw enough voltage to keep the main chime from working.
thanks,
m-m
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m-m
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On 8/5/17 11:20 am, m-m wrote:

Read the specs on the buzzer and the transformer, the series arrangement would probably upset the chime if it's in series. If the tranny will take it putting the buzzer in parallel with the chime would be better.
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But connecting in parallel would require running wires to the first chime, right?
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On 8/5/17 7:24 pm, m-m wrote:

I assumed ( not much details ) that the doors were in the same building. If the chime is remote then I guess you will have to get more technical. Things like current sensing etc. Sorry I couldn't help.
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On 05/07/2017 11:20 PM, m-m wrote:

The easiest way might be to use a wireless doorbell extender. With additional receivers/speakers you can put them in the house wherever you need to know when someone's at the front door. Go to www.1800doorbell.com for an example. Sincerely,
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On 05/07/2017 11:20 PM, m-m wrote:

Hello, and a possible alternative to the wireless solution would be to use an identical chime in series with the one currently for your front door. Assuming you use a standard 24 volt doorbell transformer you would probably need a second transformer also wired in series with the original. This would provide you with 48 volts to be divided equally between the two series-wired chimes. Sincerely,
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On 08/05/17 04:20, m-m wrote:

Not enough info, but probably some series element in circuit.
What current does the main chime takes, if it is electronic or electromechanical, the voltage of the circuit, whether it's AC or DC, will the chime work on DC.
Based on that, transistor, relay coil, transformer, opto-switch etc...
Or, a wireless door push powered from the chime supply.
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I realized the complexity of the situation and purchased a wireless extender that solved it, except the wireless chime goes off randomly sometimes. Still working on that.
It would not have been as simple as I had hoped. I would have needed another transformer and rewiring.
Thanks for your help.
m-m
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