Tool ID needed

I'm trying to ID an unusual tool that might be used for some electrical
purpose, it's number 140 on this site:
formatting link

I'm running out of ideas on where to research this one, so I was hoping
someone here could help figure out what it is.
Thanks,
Rob
Reply to
R.H.
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a device to hold and position a lens or crystal?
Reply to
no_one
looks like a bolt splitter, kinda........
Reply to
Dwaine
I think it was an experimental "flash tube." Glass might be cemented on the front and back surfaces of the "donut." The tube at the bottom would be used to extract or introduce whatever gas you want to play with. Two of the electrodes (opposite each other) are connected to the main power source. The third at the angle is used to "fire" the gas. The threads permit easy adjustment of the "spark gaps."
Frankly, I am more interested in the other things.
When you get all the answers, get back to us.
Reply to
John Gilmer
Looks like a primitive 'hole saw'. both cutters should probably adjusted and the same radius from the center point. It looks to be made to go into a brace (as in brace and bit).
Reply to
No Spam
Or a washer cutter???
Reply to
No Spam
it resembles the holder for dies in a tap and die set, however, the single woden handle would indicate it for working with softer materials then metal. perhaps wood or plastic. the guides appear to be made for sliding along a guide bar while the workpiece turns.
that's assuming it is a tool... it might be a control lever with the "guides" being range stoppers.
Reply to
TimPerry
Someone named "R.H." Proclaimed on Tue, 28 Sep 2004 23:23:14 GMT,
Some kind of clamp, Hargrave Brand, made by Cincinnati Tool.
Reply to
G. Morgan
Someone named G. Morgan Proclaimed on Tue, 28 Sep 2004 21:48:37 -0500,
Nevermind, you said #140.. I was looking at the top one...
Reply to
G. Morgan
smooth knobs mean hand adjustment - not a nut splitter wood handle protruding through - did not have a vacuum inside
hard to see metal strap, does not appear to go all the way around, perhaps only to first two bolts If so, probably an electrical device in the High voltage range 1k to 10k volt range But what? spark gap, adjusting tool for the old carbon arc lights ?? Not sure what third bolt is for, a tap off? But tabs do not look used, seem to be electrical contacts of some sort
Reply to
Dwaine
These guys send me emails all the time. That looks like it could be the tool they are selling. If you need the link, for your research of course, let me know.
From: Subject: Ad:d Inc:hes
From: "DR. BI:Gpeter" Subject: SuRPRISeH:E:R
j
Reply to
operator jay
It's a device used to test the spark quality on a gasoline engine. Used most often by small engine mechanics. It works great, and will establish if there is a spark present sufficent to ignite the fuel. Some models have a alligator clip attached to one of the screws for attaching to the engine block.
Louis -- ********************************************* Remove the two fish in address to respond
Reply to
Louis Bybee
Hole saw for potlights got one from greenlea about 50 years newer
Reply to
PCK
It's an antique medical device used to remove excess foreskin from a penis. Could you imagine when the doc started clamping that tool down on your equipment!
Reply to
Jim Douglas
Some of these have been answered on rec.puzzles, in the thread "What is it? XXV", there are some other answers in the comments at the bottom of my site.
Rob
Reply to
R.H.
A couple questions concerning your reply, I couldn't find verification of your suggestion on the web, any idea if they had a name or who sold them? Are these still used? If not, how old might this be?
Thanks to all who responded to my post. Here is a list of suggestions that I've gotten for this one:
-hand vise -electroplating tool -device to hold lens or crystal -bamboo splitter -spark checker for small gas engine -tester for bulbs -thread cutter -used to make barley twist carving -experimental flash tube -control lever -adjusting tube for old carbon arc lights
I've been posting links to my site over on rec.puzzles once or twice a week when I update it, please stop over and join us if you are interested.
Rob
Reply to
R.H.
It is a tool for evaluating the quality of a gas engine spark. I am sure of that.
I believe it was called an ignition tester. Briggs & Stratton, and many other vendors sold them. I expect they were made by some common mfgr., and r ebranded by Briggs and others.
The one in your picture is a bit different in that the tabs appear to make attaching probes to the two electrodes easier for testing voltage required to bridge the gap?
I'll post a picture I found on alt.binaries.schematics.electronics.
Interesting site you have.
Louis-- ********************************************* Remove the two fish in address to respond
Reply to
Louis Bybee
Thanks for your help in solving this one and for posting the photo. Any chance you could describe how it's used in just a sentence or two?
Rob
Reply to
R.H.
There are quite a large number of evaluations that a clever technician could use such a tool for, but in the interest brevity I'll list a few of the most common.
The lawn mower, or other small engine device wont start. Fuel or ignition? Hook the plug wire to the device, and the other terminal to the engine block, and a visual test of the ignition components under load is effected. Changing the electrode separation distance will change the degree to which the components are loaded (a wider gap will require greater voltage to arc across the gap).
It could also be used to measure (with a probe attached) the upper end of the coil/system output voltage.
It's a quick check for an engine that refuses to start using a durable, and inexpensive tool.
Louis-- ********************************************* Remove the two fish in address to respond
Reply to
Louis Bybee
Un huh.
But why is the THIRD electrode there.
Reply to
John Gilmer

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