Car key adventure

Long winded story which seemed interesting and puzzling while it was
going on.
I recently received a '96 Chrysler LHS shipped to me by auto transport.
It came with a copied key on an Axxess blank, which has only the number
17 on it. That key functioned very smoothly in ignition, trunk, and
doors. I wanted some spare keys. I took it to a local locksmith kiosk
which made numerous efforts to copy the 'original' copy onto a Curtis
Y155 blank, which also sez 'for Chrysler products'. These tries were
made by the assistant, since the locksmith himself was out on a call.
Those efforts produced a key which appeared to be identical to the
Axxess blank key, but the resultant key would not function in the trunk,
but did in the ignition and doors. The assistant made a number of
attempts and recuts and brushing and used alternative blanks out of
different boxes and was eventually successful in producing one key which
worked the trunk as well, but gave up trying to produce a second key and
wasting a number of blanks and repeated efforts.
The next day while at a local WalMart I tried to get another key made by
the staff with their 'automated' machine, which was attempted on a
WalMart Axxess blank. The automated WalMart machine works by putting
the original into one slot and the blank into the other, and the machine
does all of the 'work' for both edges of the double sided key.
Unfortunately, that result was visibly unacceptable, apparently because
of something wrong with part of the machine's cutting and its key
wouldn't work anywhere. That is, one side of one edge was incompletely
cut by the WalMart doublesided cutting tool. Attempts to turn the key
over to 'finish' the cut didn't produce a satisfactory result either.
So then I went to a different locksmith store which had 3 locksmith
employees present, presumably 2 or more of whom were 'real' or licensed
locksmiths.
The first and I presume least experienced employee worked on the problem
with the same kind of result as the first kiosk locksmith above. Those
repeated efforts caused the most senior locksmith to become interested
in the dilemma, but no trunk working key was being produced.
When the third locksmith got involved, he wanted to know what kind of
car this was for, checked a book, and said the cut [or the key?] was
like that for the 91-93 Chryslers, and that 'we' should be using an Ilco
P1794 Y157 blank. That Ilco blank looks distinctly different from the
above mentioned blanks, as it has a significantly narrower center
groove, whereas the Axxess and Curtis blanks center grooves were quite
wide.
Cutting the Ilco blank off the Axxess 'original' immediately produced a
key which worked for all locks, including the trunk. The third
locksmith was puzzled over how the working Axxess blank had been made to
work by whoever had cut it. Of course or however, the first locksmith
assistant in the kiosk had also been able to /eventually/ get one Curtis
wide grooved blank to work as well.
I'm currently presuming the Ilco is the 'proper' blank and that the
'original' I was working with which worked just fine was *not* the
proper blank. I found the whole experience to be rather frustrating
for the locksmiths involved, considering how 'trivial' the job of
copying a key would have been assumed to be. I guess that in this case
someone in the past made a wrong decision on making a copy and had
gotten away with it, until it came time for me to get a copy of that
copy.
Reply to
Mike Easter
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LOVE Axness machines... great for my business. PRE 93 Chrysler take one blank.. 93 ONLY take another different blank, and POST 93 either take y157 or 159? depending on year.. head is different shape.. then, there is a valet blank available on some as well. which IIRR without looking the 155 is. dont do many chryslers thankfully --Shiva--
Reply to
invalid unparseable
I was impressed with one locksmith. Wanted an extra automotive key made. He put the number in his code computer and originated it on the code machine - no mucking around with duplicating with attendant risks.
Reply to
Peter
Probably what happened was, the Axcess y155 (17) is a botch blank made to replace several other blanks. The y155 is a valet key that works only the doors and ign (a valet key). And also the shape of the tip of the key makes a difference. y157/y159 has a bigger slope to the tip of the key than the y155/y154 keys do, so it probably was not entering all the locks far enough acting as the valet is meant to do.
Steve
Reply to
Steve
So, does that mean that my layman's 'interest' in the distinctly different centergroove is misguided?
To look at the various keys I've described, what is most striking and noticeable is that the Ilco has a much narrower and shorter center groove, whereas the Axxess and Curtis have very wide center grooves which also extend back almost as far as the 'edge groove' or thinness of the thin side of each edge.
The Ilco's center groove does not extend back that far, and the Ilco's edge thinness side also doesn't extend back as far as the Curtis and Axcess.
The business about the tip shape and what I can see with a big magnifying glass about the edge cuts on both sides all seem to be identical.
The only thing that makes the tip look different to me between the types is the fact that the center groove is so wide on the Curtis and Axxess that it affects the appearance of the tip. That is, their center groove is wider than near the end of the tip. That big centergroove is about 3.5 mm wide, so by the time you get back 3 mm from the tip, the center groove is wider than the key tip, making a thin tip, from side to side, not edge to edge.
As opposed to the Ilco, whose sides of the center groove extend all the way to the tip.
Reply to
Mike Easter
One thing I do if I can is take a look in the ignition keyway. For Y155, the key buzzer actuator is rectangular shaped-you will see it protruding into the keyway on the right side. The actuator "rides" the large rectangular milling.
Actuators for Y154 will be triangle shaped. It rides the small V-milling.
1793V = Valet for Y155 center milling is filled up.
Want keys for a mopar-don't show me any keys- I will get the book-LOL
goma.
Reply to
goma865
I finally remember the curtis clipper-does it take the a or b carriage for that blank..but, that took years.. I carry them in a nice plastic compartmented box.. pre 93, 93, and 94+ transponder jobs go elsewhere..too many $$ to get into that.
--Shiva--
Reply to
invalid unparseable
a good professional locksmith would have used the correct blank (the Y-157) in the first place. if it didn't duplicate properly ? the professional would have simply read the bitting and code cut the key on the Y-157 blank.
my2¢
Reply to
Key
Anytime I see an Axxess blank I get the reference book out and ask the customer the vehicle make, model, and year.
I've seen way too many Axxess keys cut on the wrong blank, thank you very much Wal-Mart and Home Depot.
Reminds me of a time I was at a Home Depot because I ran out of Russwin blanks.
I asked the bone-head at the key counter if they had any Russwin blanks and he said they only had Schlage and Kwikset.
I asked what all the keys on the rack and in the boxes were for then.
He refused to answer and left the kiosk after I gave him a hard time about it.
Finally found the manager and told him I needed 2 blanks and asked him to find them because the bone-head was being tough about it.
He went back there, and it was obvious he didn't know how to find them, but I showed him the shape of the key and told him it would be either this blank, or that blank. He got them both and I had my blanks on the 2nd try.
I guess that's good for us. In a way. Sucks when it's cut on the wrong blank and we have to fix their mistake.
Sunshine Locksmith Team
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Mike Easter wrote: > Long winded story which seemed interesting and puzzling while it was > going on. > > I recently received a '96 Chrysler LHS shipped to me by auto transport. > It came with a copied key on an Axxess blank, which has only the number > 17 on it. That key functioned very smoothly in ignition, trunk, and > doors. I wanted some spare keys. I took it to a local locksmith kiosk > which made numerous efforts to copy the 'original' copy onto a Curtis > Y155 blank, which also sez 'for Chrysler products'. These tries were > made by the assistant, since the locksmith himself was out on a call. > > Those efforts produced a key which appeared to be identical to the > Axxess blank key, but the resultant key would not function in the trunk, > but did in the ignition and doors. The assistant made a number of > attempts and recuts and brushing and used alternative blanks out of > different boxes and was eventually successful in producing one key which > worked the trunk as well, but gave up trying to produce a second key and > wasting a number of blanks and repeated efforts. > > The next day while at a local WalMart I tried to get another key made by > the staff with their 'automated' machine, which was attempted on a > WalMart Axxess blank. The automated WalMart machine works by putting > the original into one slot and the blank into the other, and the machine > does all of the 'work' for both edges of the double sided key. > Unfortunately, that result was visibly unacceptable, apparently because > of something wrong with part of the machine's cutting and its key > wouldn't work anywhere. That is, one side of one edge was incompletely > cut by the WalMart doublesided cutting tool. Attempts to turn the key > over to 'finish' the cut didn't produce a satisfactory result either. > > So then I went to a different locksmith store which had 3 locksmith > employees present, presumably 2 or more of whom were 'real' or licensed > locksmiths. > > The first and I presume least experienced employee worked on the problem > with the same kind of result as the first kiosk locksmith above. Those > repeated efforts caused the most senior locksmith to become interested > in the dilemma, but no trunk working key was being produced. > > When the third locksmith got involved, he wanted to know what kind of > car this was for, checked a book, and said the cut [or the key?] was > like that for the 91-93 Chryslers, and that 'we' should be using an Ilco > P1794 Y157 blank. That Ilco blank looks distinctly different from the > above mentioned blanks, as it has a significantly narrower center > groove, whereas the Axxess and Curtis blanks center grooves were quite > wide. > > Cutting the Ilco blank off the Axxess 'original' immediately produced a > key which worked for all locks, including the trunk. The third > locksmith was puzzled over how the working Axxess blank had been made to > work by whoever had cut it. Of course or however, the first locksmith > assistant in the kiosk had also been able to /eventually/ get one Curtis > wide grooved blank to work as well. > > I'm currently presuming the Ilco is the 'proper' blank and that the > 'original' I was working with which worked just fine was *not* the > proper blank. I found the whole experience to be rather frustrating > for the locksmiths involved, considering how 'trivial' the job of > copying a key would have been assumed to be. I guess that in this case > someone in the past made a wrong decision on making a copy and had > gotten away with it, until it came time for me to get a copy of that > copy. >
Reply to
SunshineTeam.net
when the Walmart came here, the funniest one was the 10 cut Ford.. an H 60.. so, they take your key, and try in the holes-AH HA this fits, looks the same, and copy..
Guy goes out and tries it, works the door great and he is happy..
Till he has the original key leave town in wifes purse and he needs the Ford, and his key opens the door, but WHY will it not turn the ignition??? Cause the 5 cut blank Walmart copied it on, misses a few important cuts...
And i dong fix this error for a buck, either...LOLOL
I ALSO ask what it fits as well, plus have a cheat sheet printed off listing the Axness numbers to regular numbers to compare..
--Shiva--
Reply to
invalid unparseable
probably 20 bucks or so.. however, you would be getting a key that is cut back to factory specs (no wear) and not a duplicated key that has had the preexisting wear duplicated.
my2¢
Reply to
Key

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