Schlage F knobset

Anyone know of a way to remove a keyed Schlage F knob without rotating
the key before depressing the retainer? It's unlocked.
Key's broken off deeeep inside and I don't think it's being removed
unless I can get the core out and push it out the back. I've heard
there's a way to push the retainer on these without turning the key
(obviously impossible here), but I don't know the details.
Thanks much,
- Brandon
Reply to
Brandon Oto
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You'd have to disassemble the lock from the inside out. Almost impossible because the lock is stamped together, and I've never personally even attempted to do this.
Also, the key will not push out the back of the cylinder because the back is filled in solid.
Your best bet would be to take a pair of pliers and rip the face of the lock to extract the cylinder. Then take a new (or used) knob to replace the destroyed knob.
Sunshine Locksmith Team
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Anyone know of a way to remove a keyed Schlage F knob without rotating > the key before depressing the retainer? It's unlocked. > > Key's broken off deeeep inside and I don't think it's being removed > unless I can get the core out and push it out the back. I've heard > there's a way to push the retainer on these without turning the key > (obviously impossible here), but I don't know the details. > > Thanks much, > > - Brandon >
Reply to
SunshineTeam.net
I actually have viewed the cylinders in this building and know that they are not capped on the rear, which is why this came up. Killing the knob is an option but it'd be nice to avoid it...
Reply to
Brandon Oto
F cylinders ARE capped.. A and D are NOT.
there is a way to get an F off, BUT. takes tools.. destroy the knob and put on a new one-they are cheap..
A and D MUST be disassembled from the back, due to quality of construction AND cost.. to me, its a 10 minute job..
--Shiva--
Reply to
invalid unparseable
Not sure what to say -- as I said I've cracked several other knobs in this same system, identical models, and seen that the plugs are indeed open. Maybe they've done some part mixing. Only other possibility would seem that it's not actually an F, which would make the stamp a liar.
I'll see about availability for replacement knobs.
Reply to
Brandon Oto
I take part of that back.
I just did a Schlage F lever. Athough the back was solid, on the lever the "tailpiece" is held on with the screw cap and pin retainer.
So, if it's a lever, I can see how you can push the key out the back. But I don't recall ever a factory original knob lock cylinder with a hollow back.
Sunshine Locksmith Team
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Not sure what to say -- as I said I've cracked several other knobs in > this same system, identical models, and seen that the plugs are indeed > open. Maybe they've done some part mixing. Only other possibility would > seem that it's not actually an F, which would make the stamp a liar. > > I'll see about availability for replacement knobs. >
Reply to
SunshineTeam.net
I may not have been clear. The backs on these are "solid" in the sense that they're covered by the tailpiece. But that's easily removable, of course, so if I can get out the cylinder there's no reason that I can't unscrew the cap and clear it up.
This setup was certainly not installed out-of-the-box (it's a master system encompassing several buildings), and I suspect it was handled, at least at some point, by the in-house maintenance crew, so it's very plausible that the hardware has been swapped around or fiddled with a bit.
Reply to
Brandon Oto
Make yourself a little helper. Cut a blank with a lengthwise notch ao the top of the blade will retain the pins and give room for your extractor to work.
Since you apperently have the ability to take the lock off the door you might also try this. Assuming the correct key is the one broken off the tip is holding the proper pins at shearline. This leaves the pins closest to the hole in the front of the cylinder that need to be picked.
Reply to
Roger Shoaf
the F locksets I have seen, have NO tail piece.. there is a 'hole' in the plug where a tail piece rides in.. but you cannot unscrew the back on them and remove.. S, I believe you can, and A and D certainly..
now if the new style with the spring loaded cap is different, I have not seen but one of them so far..
--Shiva--
Reply to
invalid unparseable
Not the correct key? Then a little trickier but still it should be extractable, especially if you have the knob in hand.
Also you might want to do a cost/benifit calculation value of your time vs. new F lock. Customer might be better off buying a new one.
Reply to
Roger Shoaf
If this were an actual callout I probably would have facilitated a much simpler solution on the spot. I'm taking care of this is a favor to the maintenance folks at this site, which is a place I frequent anyway, and it's not a critical door, so I've been handling it kind of leisurely and seeing if I could do it without having to order replacement hardware, which would be a bother. (I don't carry these.)
It's six-pin, by the way... and getting the knob off is the whole purpose of this exercise. At least one of the cuts on this key seems like a 0 or 1, and working it past the pins with room for the extractor has defeated me.
I've spoken with one guy who says he knows a way to get these off without turning the tailpiece -- I'm going to get some more info from him soon.
Reply to
Brandon Oto
PERSONALLY, NEVER seen a 6 pin F perhaps the brand new ones are.. but the older were not.. a GENUINE F can be removed.. semi easily.. an A cannot be by the same method. --Shiva--
Reply to
invalid unparseable
You're starting to make me wonder if these are actually F's, Shiva. My experience with identifying Schlage hardware is limited; do you know of a way to categorically distinguish these from any alternative models?
I snapped a few pictures today. Beware of crummy photography.
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- Brandon
Reply to
Brandon Oto
thats not an F.. its a VERY (IMO) OLD Schlage.. the local school threw a bunch of them out recently.. if you take them apart there is IIRR a ball bearing holding the handle on, must be turned a certain way to get the knob off..
and these WERE 6 pin cylinders. Some even had Sargent cylinders in them.
--Shiva--
Reply to
invalid unparseable
Nah, these just disassemble in the same way I'm accustomed to -- turning the key 90 degrees, sticking something into the hole in the side to press the retainer, and pulling off the knob. Knob then comes into two pieces and the cylinder is free. Nothing outlandish.
- Brandon
Reply to
Brandon Oto
If the question is still, "how to take apart without the key", it's easy. Just disassemble from the back. It takes 3 or 4 minutes to take apart, remove the cylinder, and put the pieces back together.
That's assuming these are A series. From the photo, that's what they look like.
Could be a heavier series still though.
Gilles Deacur Sunshine Locksmith Team
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Nah, these just disassemble in the same way I'm accustomed to -- > turning the key 90 degrees, sticking something into the hole in the > side to press the retainer, and pulling off the knob. Knob then comes > into two pieces and the cylinder is free. Nothing outlandish. > > - Brandon >
Reply to
SunshineTeam.net
NEW type Schlage got round covers..those I am thinking are 20-30+ years old. At least the school Maintenance man was thinking that when we replaced the several he had.
--Shiva--
Reply to
invalid unparseable

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