search warrant safe opening

Reading about the police raid on Michael Jackson's Neverland home / ranch
got me to wondering...
Suppose you were rich and weird and had a collection of illegal ... whatever
... that was precious to you. You could afford as elaborate a safe /
vault
/ secret room /
etc. as you wanted. Now the police knock on the door with a
warrant. Assuming they find the safe, how far will they go to open it?
Hire a high powered tech for a couple of days to drill / blast it open? I
guess that makes sense, since they want to find what they are after, but
just how far do these searches go?
Just curious.
Reply to
Scott Berg
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Did a job for the FBI . The warrant allowed them to search the customer's safe and they hired me to do the p&e and open ANYTHING locked. Rule of thumb was unlock and move out of their way.
mr.bill
Reply to
mr.bill
yep they get to do what ever they need to do to carry out the court order..and they are under no obligation to put things back or fix them when they are done. I know of one case where an entire house was taken apart stick by stick.
Reply to
Jim Gaynor
Through the years I have been on many jobs with various law enforcement agencies. One thing they all had in common was ,they didnt care how or what I had to do as long as the container was opened for them to search.
Gary Hardigree Georgia Safe and Lock Co.
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Reply to
GHardigree
I do 2-3 search warrants a month, it depends on what the warrant says if they can even open the safe, like if you are looking for a stolen elephant you can not open a floor safe, the elephant wouldn't fit. but if you are looking for paper work on the elephant you can open the safe. Also the arrest status of the person comes into play , i opened a kidnaped victims safe, the pd paid for both opening and repair. mike is not under arrest, his safe would most likely have to be opened with care. A drug dealer sitting in cuffs can have his safe opened with a crow bar and destroyed. But one thing to remember is all of the suspects are given the opportunity to give up the combos before someone is called in to do an opening.
Reply to
todd
If you presume that folks who are expecting the FBI may have boobytrapped the safe, moving out of the way is a Very Good Thing; dealing with that threat is THEIR job.
Reply to
Joe Kesselman (yclept Keshlam
How did you get that gig? Did they call you one day, or did you approach them? And if the latter, whom did you contact to offer your services?
Bobby
Reply to
Bob DeWeese, CML
bobby I subcontract out to @ 35 locksmiths, and it just ends up getting known , as for approaching the pd , they dont seem to talk among themselves, so you might do the drug warrants but someone else does the vice warrants
Reply to
todd
If they have a search warrant they will go as far as they need to to open and container they suspect contains material covered by the warrant. Opening virtually any safe is not a big deal when you don't have to worry about time or secrecy.
I have heard of several cases where police searches missed hidden material that was later discovered accidently.
Reply to
Putyourspamhere
Do any PD's charge the owner for cracking a safe where the owner refuses to divulge the combo?
Reply to
Peter
Do you charge more for the increase risk in these situations to offset the money you might have to spend for an attorney if you get sued?
Reply to
Slice
They will sue the cops - the cops (rather City Hall, the County, the State or Uncle Sam) have deeper pockets. Interestingly, how many locksmiths have been sued when helping the cops?
Reply to
Peter
It might not hurt to consult an attorney just in case: some state governemental immunity laws might not allow a suit against the police, but a locksmith MIGHT still be a viable defendant.
Reply to
bob555
they sign the 'permission slips out the Yazoo BEFORE I would touch one... just because... and define the HOW to be opened... repairable, or not...
--Shiva--
Reply to
--Shiva--
Presumably the immunity laws also cover people assisting police in execution of their duties, so a formal written request to assist should extend that immunity to the person doing the opening. Attorney's advice is appropriate and the local association or guild may well have sought such advice.
Reply to
Peter

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