Steam after leave shower?

I know I am overreacting because of a mold six months ago in the hallway
outside thsi bathroom. But I get out of the shower and the mirror is clear,
then it starts steamin then unsteaming. I have a sliding door on the tub with
about nine inches breathing space above. Is this normal? I guess I usually
open the hallway door too soon and didn't notice it before?
- = -
Vasos Panagiotopoulos, Columbia'81+, Reagan, Mozart, Pindus, BioStrategist
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Reply to
vjp2.at
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Dear vjp2...:
Normal behavior when you do not have openings low to let the air steam up the mirror from the beginning. Also depends on the temperature / humidity in the house, etc.
Use the bathroom vent. If you don't have one, you'll either have to take baths, or add a vent.
David A. Smith
Reply to
dlzc
Agreed... The exhaust vent fan in the bathroom should be turned on before starting your shower...
Keep the bathroom door closed after your shower and allow the vent fan to run for at least twice as long as the amount of time you spent in the shower again with the door closed to adequately vent the excess moisture...
If you are showering in the morning before leaving for work you can accomplish the extended venting period by installing a "count-down timer type switch" for the vent fan and allow it to run and shut off by itself after you have left...
Those steps should drastically eliminate any risk of mold coming back in your hallway...
~~ Evan
Reply to
Evan
The timer switch is what I have, but you can also go a step further and install a humidistat so that the fan will turn off by itself when the air is dry enough.
Reply to
DerbyDad03
Definitely. The breathing space is there in case the tub fills to about 7 feet, 3 inches. So you still have 9 inches of air, for emergencies.
It's not too soon. It doesn't matter. In the winter, unless you have a house humidifier, it's probably good to release the humidity from the bathroom into the whole house. In the spring and fall it doesn't matter. In the summer, it probably adds a bit to the AC cost if you use AC.
It will also take less time for you to dry if you let some less humid air into the bathroom.
It steams. It unsteams. It's okay. It does it twice. That's okay too.
This mold in the hall, did you find out what caused it? How long have you lived there? Other molds? Did you do anything different this time?
Reply to
mm
Sounds a bit odd if it is seaming and clearing. I find that leaving the door open a bit takes care of any problems. Do you live in a very humid area? Any way to open a window? Bathrooms should have either a window or a vent.
I see that some people are saying to add an exhaust fad, but in my past houses I never had one and never had a moisture problem in 45 years. There is no need to seal the door shut taking a shower though so let it vent a bit. Unless you live in the humid tropics, it should be OK.
Reply to
Ed Pawlowski
I have a fan with a countdown timer and I leave it on half an hour.
I believe the fan works but because it is discontinued, my uncle keeps rebuilding it with epoxy to avoid carpentry. He claims there are no more fans made to fit the original space. I ask him to let me find a fan and he refuses.
The steamy mirror only lasted a minute with the door closed. I was just surprised because if I had left the bathroom in my usual haste I would not have noticed it.
- = - Vasos Panagiotopoulos, Columbia'81+, Reagan, Mozart, Pindus, BioStrategist
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---{Nothing herein constitutes advice. Everything fully disclaimed.}--- [Homeland Security means private firearms not lazy obstructive guards] [Urb sprawl confounds terror] [Phooey on GUI: Windows for subprime Bimbos]
Reply to
vjp2.at
*+-This mold in the hall, did you find out what caused it? How long have *+-you lived there? Other molds? Did you do anything different this *+-time?
The mold was when the bathroom humidity hit the wall where the fridge is. Also, thre was a problem with the bathroom door not closing right. I've been very conservative in using this bathroom as a consequence. If there wasn't an asbestos sand paint (5% white asbestos?, peeled after washing with Tide, badly covered with wall liner, then coroplast.com) problem where the mold was, it would not induce so much panic. Wood frame, brick and shingle veneer, sheetrock house built in 1963 (original owner) in Queens, NYC near where East RIver becomes Long Island Sound.
- = - Vasos Panagiotopoulos, Columbia'81+, Reagan, Mozart, Pindus, BioStrategist
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---{Nothing herein constitutes advice. Everything fully disclaimed.}--- [Homeland Security means private firearms not lazy obstructive guards] [Urb sprawl confounds terror] [Phooey on GUI: Windows for subprime Bimbos]
Reply to
vjp2.at
I've been experimenting with opening the tub doors from both ends and running cold water before I finish. I think I'm close to something. But I think the cold water causes more steaming. Maybe it forces out the warm vapor.
- = - Vasos Panagiotopoulos, Columbia'81+, Reagan, Mozart, Pindus, BioStrategist
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---{Nothing herein constitutes advice. Everything fully disclaimed.}--- [Homeland Security means private firearms not lazy obstructive guards] [Urb sprawl confounds terror] [Phooey on GUI: Windows for subprime Bimbos]
Reply to
vjp2.at
Same here. My house is so damned dry in the winter, even with TWO humidifiers going 24/7 that a hot steamy shower doesn't hurt a thing. In fact I have to towel off quickly and get my hair combed because otherwise my hair gets too dry to comb and I end up walking around looking like a brillo pad all day.
Reply to
mkirsch1
Unfortunately, you're uncle is probably right. I did quite a bit of searching a few years ago and all the bath fans I could find were intended for either new construction or at least where you had access from above, eg attic. If you have attic access, then installing a new one may not be that difficult, as you could get a new one that has at least that size opening or larger. Otherwise, I could not find any that were made where you could just put it into a given size opening from below and fasten it into place.
You should check the existing fan to see if it is doing anything besides running, ie feel for air flow on the outside where the vent goes. Hopefully it goes there, right, not into the attic? With any vent system that old, anything could have happened, eg collapsed tubing, clogged with dirt, birds, etc,.
You can also buy humidity meters for about $10 at Walmart. I've tried a few of them and they are close to each other and seem to be reading correctly.
Reply to
trader4

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