12" Atlas Model 101 27430 lathe - size motor?

I was given a 12" Atlas Model 101 27430 lathe and I just learned that the motor had been replaced/ provided since the old one was missing.
No specs were consulted. What are the motor specs for this lathe?
I have a 5.8 amp two phase, 1/3 hp, 1725 rpm, GE that will run in reverse also.
Mike
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The baby 6" runs on a 1/3hp motor. I'd suggest at least 3/4 to 1hp for the 12".
LLoyd
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1/3 hp is too small for your lathe. 3/4 hp is the minimum for moderate useage, 1 hp if you want to carve off some blue chips.
snipped-for-privacy@noplace.org wrote:

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The heading Bigger is better and Newer is better can be applied to a lot of things from cars to women. I'm not contemplating replacing or purchasing a new motor at this time but simply attempting to establish what I got and make it run. Has anybody seen an actual specification for the motor size and rpm etc. for this lathe? My use will NOT be for production - likely just for fun and perhaps only in softer metals and even plastic. Time is not a factor - 28 rpm may be just fine <grin>. With that in mind - what may I be missing?
Mike
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I am running a 1/2 horse on my 101.07403 12in. and it works quite well. I think a 3/4 to 1hp would be overkill and may bump up against the countershaft...but who knows. Anyway, the 1/3 will work also, depends on how hard you will push it.
The 1/2 is forgiving when I forget to disengage the back gear. It just squeals the belts, but nothing broken. I like a forgiving lathe...not much else in this world gives me a break when I brain fart...
John
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A half horse motor is usually used with that size lathe but a 1/3 hp motor will do the job well enough. Remember that those lathes are light duty lathes and won't take the power that other makers lathes will take.
-- Why do penguins walk so far to get to their nesting grounds?
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Mine is 1/2 HP and it's been fine for everything I've tried to do with it. Since you already have the 1/3, why not try it and worry about it only if it seems underpowered. :-)
Best Regards, Keith Marshall snipped-for-privacy@progressivelogic.com
"I'm not grown up enough to be so old!"
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On Thu, 10 Aug 2006 23:13:30 GMT, "Keith Marshall"

Hi Keith; That is what I intend to do. Had no feel for the size required - or even knowledge of what the lathe mfg was suggesting. Still don't.
Mike
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Most manufacturers do not "suggest", they just "supply" one that is cheap enough to sell. My table saw with a 1 hp open frame motor works so much better with a 2 hp TEFC. And my 10" Logan with a 1/2hp motor would sure like a better drive system.
snipped-for-privacy@noplace.org wrote:

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    [ ... ]

    I *think* that he is talking about a 220V single-phase motor. No, it is *not* two phase. I don't think that we really want to restart that debate. :-)
    Real two phase motors exist -- but they are extremely rare, and pretty close to useless in most of the country.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
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On 11 Aug 2006 05:00:32 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) wrote:

All I meant was that I plug it into a standard 110 v outlet - is that not two phase?
and 220v - three phase?
mike
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No, Mike. Residential 110v service is single phase. Residential 220v service is single phase, also.
Three phase power is available in most industrial settings, but seldom in a residential area.
LLoyd
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On Fri, 11 Aug 2006 16:19:38 GMT, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

Well MF Live and learn.
What makes the difference (other than perhaps wire size) between residential and industrial? Same two hots + neut for 220???
Mike
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For a given ampacity, there's no difference between industrial and residential single phase power wiring.
Three phase has three hots and no 'neutral', although there is a ground. (How can it deliver power from three hots and no neutral, he asks?)
Three phase power is developed phase-to-phase in what are called "Wye" or "Delta" configurations.
LLoyd
LLoyd
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That's just a phase you're going through. No to worry.. hang around here, and it'll pass quickly
WB ..............
snipped-for-privacy@noplace.org wrote:

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    [ ... ]

    [ ... ]

    No -- that is single phase. The only 110V three phase which I have encountered was to run aircraft gyrocompasses and artificial horizons -- and that was also 400 Hz, not 60 Hz.

    No -- at least not in the typical home shop. 220v in the home is also single phase.
    The difference between the two (in US home wiring) is that the home gets 220V (or 240V, or 230V or somewhere in the vicinity) from the transformer either on a power pole or a transformer in a housing on the lawn. The center tap of that 220V winding is connected to ground and brought as a neutral to the house. 110V equipment is connected between one of the ends of the winding and the neutral, while 220V equipment is connected between the two ends, ignoring the neutral center tap. So power comes from two wires in either case (though some 220V equipment, such as an electric oven in the kitchen or an electric clothes dryer may run some 110V devices between the neutral and one side. In an oven, it would be likely to be the light bulb in the oven, or a timer mounted on the back panel. Note that there is also a separate ground brought to the equipment for safety -- and no current should normally be drawn through that line -- though exceptions used to be made for the single light bulb in the oven, or the timer in the clothes drier. That is no longer allowed.
    True three phase has three wires bringing power to the load (motor or other things), *plus* a safety ground, plus an optional neutral.
    The voltage on each of those lines compared to one of the others will reach a peak either before or after the other combinations used as comparisons.
    With standard household power, one side of the 220V line reaches a positive peak at the same instant as the other reaches a negative peak, so there is no time shift to draw a motor in one direction or the other, which is what three phase motors depend upon.
    BTW -- your lathe's motor can probably be re-wired to operate from 220V instead of 110V. This has some advantages. It draws less current at 220V, so it can operate with lighter gauge wire, and it is less likely to trip a circuit breaker than when running on 110V. My Clausing with a 1-1/2 HP motor was tripping the 110V circuit breaker about one start in eight -- just often enough to be a nuisance. Rewiring it for 220V cured that problem. You may not have this problem as your motor is smaller.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
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On 11 Aug 2006 21:16:08 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) wrote:

I take your word for all that. I will need to find a good basic write up of both the theory and the practical wiring involving NON 110v stuff. Know of any such?
When I changed the whole house fan and the forced air motors I simply copied wire colors - not knowing precisely what was going on. Luckily it worked.
Mike
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    [ ... a lot -- now snipped ... ]

    Not really. I've been playing around with electricity (at least low-voltage DC electricity) since the 1950s or a bit earlier -- as a kid), and working with electronics for most of my life since.

    O.K. For 115VAC house wiring the basic rules:
1    Black is *hot* (think "death" :-)
2)    White is neutral. (Or it may be the other side of a 220V     feed.)
3)    Red may be the other side of a 220V feeed.
4)    Green, or green with yellow stripes, or bare copper is the     safety ground.
    Note that blue and brown are used in recent European equipment, and I would have to look it up myself to be sure about them. The green/yellow remains the safety ground.
    And note that the meaning of black (and other colors) *changes* in electronics devices past the AC power point.
    Black in there is ground.
    White is a signal wire of no particularly dangerous voltage.
    Red is a positive DC voltage. (Commonly +5V in computer power     supplies.
    Yellow is a second DC voltage. (Commonly +12V in computer power     supplies.
    Blue is frequently a negative voltage -- with -12V being common     in computer power supplies.
    Green is frequently filament voltage (low AC voltage -- typically     6.3 or 12.6 Volts) in *old* tube equipment.
    For other colors -- all bets are off. Sometimes you will find     the colors representing wire numbers matching the color codes     used to mark the values of resistors:
    0    Black     1    Brown     2    Red     3    Orange     4    Yellow     5    Green     6    Blue     7    Violet     8    Gray (or Slate)     9    White
    and in some ribbon cables, the colors have no meaning other than     wire numbers -- so black is not necessarily ground, and red is     not necessarily a positive DC voltage.
    All of this about electronics is just to show you that the     colors in electronics *don't* follow house wiring rules.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 12 Aug 2006 00:15:53 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) wrote:
<snip>

<snip>
I was taught (worked in electical for a few years) that if you make "white" hot, it is always hot.
When running romex it is sometimes necessary to make white hot. For instance when running a single romex down to say a light switch. In this case you would make the hot wire coming down to the light switch white and the switched leg going back to the light black. Now you have the proper black in the light box to go with the white neutral. Most likely you would also have the white going down to the light switch in a wire nut with a black feeding the light box from another source.
It was a simple rule and made good sense to me. I have always tried to follow it. Figuring out somebody else's wiring is easy if they followed this rule.
I'll be curious to see if Bruce has anything to add :)
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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I believe the only use of a white wire to be hot, that's permitted, is for lighting circuits. The references I've seen have described this method for commercial and residential lighting fixtures. I don't recall if this method was also permitted for wall receptacles controlled by a wall switch, though.
All of the references that I've seen, for using the white wire have directed that the white insulation be marked black when it's used for a hot lead. This can be permanent marker or electrical tape wrapped around the length of the white lead. If the hot lead isn't clearly marked, someone else could be exposed to shock or electrocution from a wire/terminal that's usually not recognized as hot.
WB ............
Leon Fisk wrote:

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