17" south bend "turnado"

im in central IL and would like to know if theres any good parts sources
for these? i can get one really really cheap but it needs belts and
maybe more. the ways look just great.
Reply to
erik litchy
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Turnado's are imports, just sold by South Bend. I believe they are french. Parts are a big problem. Especially the fancy clutches for the motor braking. I know people who have scrapped em, just because of the parts situation.
You can check with the South Bend guys-especially if you have a serial number-
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also with LeBlond, who sell the parts for South Bend
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I would consider it an orphan, though, and that means it is worth about scrap price if it isnt running.
Reply to
Ries
The Turnado was Southbend's attempt to get into the gearhead engine lathe market. They were imported with a Southbend label slapped on. With Southbend out of business parts may be hard to get, pricey, or both. Of course a belt should be obtainable from any power transmission supply.
Reply to
Tony
I worked in commercial shops for years, as a machinist. One shop had what was a relatively new Turnado. My honest opinion is it was the worst machine I'd ever encountered. Damned thing was always broken for one reason or another. I wouldn't accept one as a gift. For your own good, look for a better machine. That damned thing will give you an attitude and sour you towards machine tools in general. .
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
ok ok it wasnt my first choice anyway. it was just sooo cheap.
i like the look of the older lodge and shipley lathes but its hard to find them in decent shape.
Reply to
erik litchy
If you have such options, don't close any doors on Monarch, P&W, LeBlond, American, Axelson and many other fine American built machines. You can also include Mori Seiki, which is one bullet proof machine. I think I'd be cautious about a Cincy Traytop, too. I've run one of them and wasn't impressed, although Cincinnati builds some wonderful machines.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
I may be wrong..but as I recall..the Turnado was made in Brazil
Gunner
"A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them; the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences." - Proverbs 22:3
Reply to
Gunner
I have no idea, but if they were, they'd have done the US machinists a kindness by never permitting them to be imported.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos

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