6061 T6

How hot can this material get before the 'temper' gets messed up?
I am thinking of using 'super glue' for some fixturing and as the glue needs
some 500 degrees F. to release will this alter the temper?
Regards.
Ken.
Reply to
Ken Davey
Loading thread data ...
Well, 6061 is tempered to T6 condition by heating it to about 990 degrees F to get a supersaturated solution, rapidly quenching to keep the alloys in this supersaturated solution as the metal solidifies, and then reheating to around 320 degrees F for a certain time to precipitate out some out the alloy to get the desired mechanical properties. The later process is referred to as artificial aging. So, you would further artificially age the material. As you age 6061, it will get harder and stronger. However, if you overage it, it will start to get softer and weaker. Aging is dependent on time and temperature. My guess is the time required required to get the superglue to release won't have much effect on the part, maybe make it a little harder and stronger.
Reply to
footy
Sounds like a theory I can live with. Thanks.
Ken.
Reply to
Ken Davey
6061-T6 has a temp/time/strength curve that is fine at 500 degrees, really drops into the basement at 700 degrees. It will drop to 15% of original strength if you exceed the temps.
There is a 1700 page government .pdf "Aerospace Materials Handbook" that shows all the tables. don't have the download address off hand.
Ken Davey wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
Thanks Roy.
Reply to
Ken Davey
Something to consider Ken is the size of the part that you are looking to fixture. If the adhesive needs 500F to begin to release, you are going to have to input a considerable amount of heat into the part. You may find that you have to really heat the part a lot longer than you want to so that the glue will begining to let go.
Craig C. snipped-for-privacy@ev1.net
Reply to
cvairwerks
The part is about 2 cubic inches - it isn't critical. Failure will not put anyone/thing at risk. A change in tempering could possibly cause problems in subsequent machining operations.
Ken.
Reply to
Ken Davey
If it goes all the way through it's annealing change, it gets real gummy to machine. It would be real tough to get threads to look nice.
The offical title of the reference book I use is "METALLIC MATERIALS AND ELEMENTS FOR AEROSPACE VEHICLE STRUCTURES" MIL-HDBK-5J
For 6061-T6, Page 3-275 (page 577 of the .pdf version) shows that 1/2 hour at 500 degrees drops yield to 40% of orginal, 1/2 hour at 550 drops it 30%, and 1/2 hour at 600 to 20% Pretty ugly!
Ken Davey wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
Thanks very much for your research and advice Roy. I abandoned the 'super glue' route in favour of some creative clamping. Job is done and all is right in my world.
Regards. Ken.
RoyJ wrote:
Reply to
Ken Davey
This came up a few months back when I got asked about a process oven using some 6061-T6 carrier plates for the product. they had been having warpage issues when using it at 600 degrees F. but now they wanted to go to 675. I researched it and was very surprised to see the huge strength issues coming in a what I considered to be a fairly low temperature.
Ken Davey wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.