Air powered booster pump?

Trucks, Freightliner, Volvo, Kenworth, etc, normally have air system set @120psi or so.
I've found the highest I can inflate the tires using the truck
air system & a 50' hose is 97-98psi.
Need a bit more. Looking for 115psi on the steers(cold) & 105psi on the drives.
Was wondering if an air powered booster pump would be possible?
Say, 50% of the airstream as high-pressure supply, and the rest to drive the booster?
If not practical, any easier/better way?
thanks
gary
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com fired this volley in

A simple "air amplifier" booster consisting of two cylinders of different diameters and some valving would do what you want. You only need boost for the last 20psi, or so, and your tailing volume is small compared to what it takes to fill the tire.
Pre-assembled commercial versions exist.
I owned an old DeVilbiss air-powered 'airless' paint sprayer that pumps paint at 1000psi from 80psi air. It consisted of a 2" cylinder direct- driving a 1/2" pump cylinder, and a couple of end-of-travel valves to reverse the direction the big one.
Lloyd
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On Sun, 14 Dec 2014 08:29:29 -0600, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

The Air Force used to use a simple double cylinder "air booster" that would pump a thousand PSI (for landing gear shock struts) using a conventional 100 PSI air compressor.
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On Sun, 14 Dec 2014 06:07:45 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

A longer hose will slow the flow of air, but you should be able to get the very same pressure at the tire as you do at the compressor, within a pound or two.

I doubt it. Using the air in the system to drive a venturi pump would immediately drop the pressure in the system so the original compressor couldn't keep up. They are as bad as sandblasting systems, as far as "big holes in the tank" go.

If the compressors are capable, can you set the nominal system pressure to 140? That should boost actual pressure to get you the 115psi that you need. Doublecheck it with another gauge.
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Probably, and that's exactly what I did when I owned the truck I was driving.
Now being a driver, no longer an owner, as well as this vehicle being the property of the leasing company, I can't make any kind of mods to it.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Where are you tapping the air? I've pulled full system air pressure from the glad hand with no issues. That said I've also used a simple SCUBA tank set-up to fill tires.
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On 12/14/2014 8:07 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

A long hose with small center hole is a high resistance. If you have joint leaks, the pressure will drop before you get to use it. You are dropping (maybe ) 20 PSI in the hose. Try a larger ID hose with fewer connections.
Does the pump put out 120 really ?
Martin
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On Sun, 14 Dec 2014 20:19:48 -0600, Martin Eastburn

Martin, the resistance in the hose is only during full flow. Give it 5 seconds and the full pressure hits the far end. It's the law!

Good question. Gauge error?
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or so.

The tire pressure is 30PSI when the gauge on my inflater shows 35PSI, with its trigger handle off. The inflater gauge has a non-standard thread, else I would have replaced it.
As a cross check I measure and record tread depth when I swap winter and summer tires, and keep track of which position they came off last time with rf, lf, rr, lr marked inside the center hole cap.
-jsw
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On 12/15/2014 9:18 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

If there is flow the restriction will drop pressure. If you measure static pressure you should read 120. If you measure dynamic pressure (at use flow) it will be lower. You might read 20 if the use of the air is great.
The tank is to far away to help the out rush. A local tank would be of better use - e.g. fill it and use from it while refiling from the long hose.
Martin
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On Mon, 15 Dec 2014 21:49:54 -0600, Martin Eastburn

HIGH flow. How much flow is going to happen between 90 and 105psi, though? Some, but low. There should be very little pressure drop.

Of course, but we're talkin' airing tires on a truck from a pump on the vehicle.

For a flat, yes, but to go from 100 to 115?
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On 12/16/2014 9:53 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

If there are no connectors or If the connectors are 'air tight'. They are likely leaking on both ends and in the middle if there is one.
A local tank on the end would be best - have the long hose fill it and then start to use it from the local tank - as it refills but the tank supplies the inrush flows and the big squirts setting the connector onto the valve.

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On Thu, 18 Dec 2014 22:02:20 -0600, Martin Eastburn

Not 20 or more psi-worth, I wouldn't think.

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You have pressure drop only when there's flow.
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I'm using a connection from the gladhands, as that's the easiest.
No promises as to the accuracy of the gauge, it's certainly not a precision instrument. At least no more than the rest of the truck. And I would have to call a freightliner a small(very small) step better than an Intrashational.
Found the following on ebay. Can anyone suggest what the tube/hoses and unidentified unit hooked to the amplifier is/does?
thanks
gary
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Haskel-air-amplifier-and-air-pilot-switch-/111187125389?pt=Pneumatic_Hydraulic_Valves_Parts&hash=item19e344e48d&nma=true&si=khpFdyr198x1kIwSNMNguwEcrVA%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557
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On Mon, 15 Dec 2014 06:21:51 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

So get a better gauge and pop a QD on the end so you can tell.

That listing is expired/unavailable. The header says it's a piloted device, so you're probably looking at feedback and control tubes.
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or so.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pascal%27s_law
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volley in

PT, you seem to be implying that the pressure will be equal in both parts of the air amplifier because they are both connected to the source supply -- which would be the case, if the prior were the case.
But the source only serves to fill the smaller cylinder when it is fully retracted. It possesses a check valve so that as soon as its pressure rises above supply, it's cut off from that source, and free to build pressure to whatever level the ratio of areas between it and the 'driving' cylinder allow.
LLoyd
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message or so.

The steam injector is a clever booster pump without moving parts that uses steam at boiler pressure to force feed water in at a -higher- pressure. http://www.steamlocomotive.com/appliances/injectors.php
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/16/Injector_Giffard-02.jpg
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_Giffard
I was tediously making tapered drill bits until I realized that these would drill nozzles:: http://www.dynamitetoolco.com/snappy-49409-9-64-replacement-hex-shank-drill-p/snp-49409.htm
-jsw
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Larry, you should work on that. You certainly should be wearing out bits; but not breaking them. 1/16" twist drills don't break any easier than any other size, if you're running them at the right chip load, with the right lubricant.
What and how are you drilling that you break enough bits to justify having a entire pocket-full of just the one size? (And, you know those Horrible Fright drills aren't centered, and don't have consistent rake from flute to flute???)
LLoyd
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