Any experience with VISE-GRIPLocking Wrench?

This Vise Grips has 1 jaw with 2 smooth surfaces at 60 degrees to each
other and a smooth opposing surface:
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In theory it seems like it would be very good for holding rounded off
hex heads/nuts. But is it really that much better than plain 'ole
toothed jaws Vise Grips? And enough better to justify a dedicated tool?
I guess its real advantage is getting a _tight_ grip on hex without
marring any surfaces. Face it - hardly any wrench fits a hex
head/nut/fitting without a little slop. Mostly because the hex is
undersize.
Anybody own one?
Bob
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
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Nope, but I've had the same thought. Looks like it could work well if you still have an area for the vee to fit/lock on to.
I have a couple of these though:
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Two different sizes. Work really nice for big nuts. Stuff like the nut on a ball hitch or large conduit compression fitting. You get a bit better grip than say a large adjustable wrench. I can usually find an adjustable wrench first though...
Problem with them though is you got to have free access all the way around the problem nut/bolt head. How often does that happen ;-)
Reply to
Leon Fisk
The smallest common bolt sizes it will clamp onto without shims are 1/2" and M10, for which the handle is rather short to break loose a frozen nut. Some of the 1/2" nuts on my truck torque to 100 ft-lbs. Also it needs more than the usual clearance around the hex, considerably more than an impact socket, and has no angular offset so the handle lies tight against the surface. I haven't found a use where a 6 point socket wouldn't do better, and I'll be happy if owning it guarantees I never will.
The minimum size of 7/16" refers to a 7/16" bolt with a 5/8" hex head. It's loose on 3/8" (9/16" hex) and M8 heads.
- - - - - - A while ago I asked about a jack stand with a screw adjustment. The other day I found a telescoping screw jack from an old Land Cruiser which looks perfect.
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Fully extended it's about an easily shimmed inch short of the table of my 4x6 horizontal bandsaw. To cut long heavy stock I balance the stock on the table, rig up support at the height of the end, then move the stock onto the support.
-jsw, finishing off the last chocolate Easter bunny.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
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Good point. A lot of the time you don't have the access. Too often you don't have the room to swing either and resetting the Vise Grips every 60 degrees would be tedious. Bob
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
I forgot to mention that it's a good non-marring nail puller that needs only a stub of the shank to grab. -jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Where were they 30 years ago???? That's the only type of "gripping pliers" from any manufacturer that has any business being used as a "wrench"
Reply to
clare
Got a couple, they are handy for junk yard toolboxes. They also work reasonably well to remove rounded nuts/bolts.
Reply to
Steve W.
I've seen more torn-up nuts with vise-grip marks on them. You know, those yahoos with 2 screwdrivers, a pair of vise grips, and a big crescent wrench who call themselves handymen, millwrights or engineers?
*** These three nice tools/toolsets were in links from that wrench. I'd like to have all 3.
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When there's no room for straight pliers.
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I've needed these more times than I can say. They go at the top of my wishlist.
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These probably aren't very strong, but they could get into lots of tight, deep spaces. I have a couple pairs of long needlenoses, but they can't go deep + tight.
QUESTION: I don't have any experience with Triplett tools or jaws. Are they good, hardened steel which keep their teeth? Anyone? One can flatten the teeth on HF vise grips in one session. Me no like.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
HF has those except they don't have the rubber on them. Probably about the same quality in looking over the Amazon reviews. I've got a pair from HF but they were a "just in case" buy. For when I was changing out the fuel tank on my truck. Never used them yet. See:
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Ended up using these for the long reach work. The 20 deg mostly:
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There are four of them all told. Straight, 20, 45 and 90 deg. You need to buy them from the store though. Check out the jaw alignment and make sure it is okay first. A lot of them are poorly lined up. They go on sale a lot. Don't pay full price...
Reply to
Leon Fisk

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