Anyne can recognize this?

Any idea what it is, it is incredibly cute.
http://goo.gl/IQlnSm

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On 6/4/2014 9:24 PM, Ignoramus13687 wrote:

press. On the rod where a chunk of material would be placed is there an impression ? - is that a die ?
Put a chunk of wax or something and press it lightly. See what happens - looks maybe another item..
Is it a grommet press ? button swag or Blue jean - metal grommet press...
Looks neat and ready for a semi-production line.
Leather works or such.
Martin
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    Or perhaps a press for eyelets for printed circuit boards from before plateed-through holes were common? Or turret terminals on component boards?
    Maybe for seating a hand on a dial indicator or a watch?
    No other views posted?
    Details of the rod and the head might help.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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wrote:

I'm sure it's much older than that. I'm guessing 1940s at the latest.
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    O.K. Not for printed circuit boards -- but for mil-spec electronics, there were Bakelite or Phenolic boards (usually fiber reinforced) which had a number of turret terminals staked into the two long edges of the board. Normally, components (resistors and smaller capacitors) were soldered between the top layer of the two turret terminals on opposite sides of the board, and the wires leading off to elsewhere were soldered to the lower level of the turret terminal.
    This URL:
<http://www.digikey.com/catalog/en/partgroup/turret-terminals-keystone-electronics/23324>
(eventually) brings up a three-layer turret terminal. Click the right arrow five times, and you get the kind I was thinking about. The cylindrical section shown towards you goes through a hole in the board, and the near end is swaged outwards to hold it in place.
    O.K. Digikey part number: 1593-2, which takes us to:
<http://www.digikey.com/product-search/en?mpart93-2&vendor6>
bTW    It looks as though the lever on the side of the base raises the     round platform into contact with the tooling above. I would     like to see more detailed photos of the tooling above.
    These turret terminals need support from below and a swaging     terminal from above. I've used both small modified arbor     presses to install them -- and (in the late 1950s) a rather     scary tool, which had a killer solenoid to bring down the swage     tool when you touched a foot pedal. I was young, and did not     trust it at all. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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I used those in the 1970's in one-off high-voltage circuits for a custom test equipment maker. Several hits with a spring-loaded center punch staked them in place securely. IIRC I rolled the open end down against the board with the punch for shoelace-sized eyelets from my camping gear sewing kit. That's when I started wishing for a metal lathe. -jsw
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    [ ... ]

    I've been known to use a 1/4" ball bearing and a hammer. :-)
    The proper tool, not only is turned to form the roll properly, but it is also polished to minimize friction and drag marks on the metal which might weaken it. So add to the lathe (which you now have, no doubt) a Dremel a felt point and some jeweler's rouge. :-) Start with a hardenable metal, shape it and harden it, and then polish it.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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    O.K. I really meant close-ups, with the assembly on the head filling the frame. I've saved one of the frontal images, and cropped and zoomed to try to make sense of that. (The rest is pretty clear, the lever on the base raises the round platform. The lever on the side at the top of the support collar from the base allows the column to be slid up and down before locking -- and to be rotted to bring the probe more centered over the platform. The knob on the back of the ram either allows the ram to be rotated to tilt the head, or moves the head in and out relative to the column. I'm not sure about the thumbscrew on the far side of the base, though it might release the round platform to allow it to be removed and replaced -- or allow it to rotate or not.
    But zooming in to the actual head is indeed interesting. It looks as though there is some form of oil pump in the head -- or is this simply a series of links to allow it to be moved around relative to the round platform? I should have saved a side image while I was at the web page. O.K. Re-visited.
    Is that collector of black or blued steel a link which folds out and in to allow positioning the spindle over parts of the round table?
    It looks to me as though the top of it is designed to clamp on a dial indicator.
    More details of the bottom of the spindle would also help. It looks like it is intended to press something into the workpiece, and seeing a bottom end view of it might give extra clues. The center part of it probably couples to the (missing) dial indicator, to allow the proer amount of press in.
    But show us the bottom of the spindle, and how much the linkage at the top of the head flexes, and maybe we can come up with something or other.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On Thu, 05 Jun 2014 20:13:59 -0500, Ignoramus30385

Now that there are more and better pictures I know what the device does. It checks bores. So it is some type of bore gauge. The indicator is missing of course but also maybe missing is a rod that runs through the center of the plunger. Looking again at the picture it looks like the rod is there. Anyway, you can see where the plunger is split and at the top there is an oval hole through the plunger and on either side of the oval hole metal has been machined away so that the split plunger can close up easily when inserted into a hole. When the plunger is inserted into a hole and the end collapses a little it pushes the rod inside the plunger up. The end of the rod is tapered so that the plunger squeezing it causes it to rise. The rise is then measured wuth an indicator. I don't know what all the other stuff on the top is for but it is ultimately a tool for measuring bores in a controlled fashion. The part to be measured is placed on the round table which is raised with the lever. I'm sure the operator would not be touching part when it was measured and this would tend to remove any influence from the operator on the indicated dimension. Eric
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On Wed, 04 Jun 2014 21:24:55 -0500, Ignoramus13687

Just darlin'! What do the adjustments cause to happen? The knurled knob on the top right, does it rotate and could it have been driven by a belt? What about the lever in front/bottom? Does it allow/cause the pedestal to rotate?
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It's a Miller Lite beer can. 12 ouncer based on the size of the leather punch beside it.
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Awesome! Thanks! Great sense of humor too!
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