Anyone give me a straight answer?


What is the payload for a 2006 Dodge 2500 short bed with Cummins engine?
I've googled until I'm dizzy, and most links take me somewhere that they
want to sell you things, are full of popups, or you have to enter personal
information to continue.
I have gotten from 2150# to 2635#. I am talking about total cargo carrying
capacity. The load in the bed, a tank of gas, two passengers, and some
luggage.
Yeah, yeah, yeah, I can read GVWR, and all those numbers, but have yet to
deduce a firm CCC number.
Anyone know?
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
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Which one do you want? The one in the owners manual? The "do not exceed or warrantee is void? The "you can do this once in a while on smooth roads if you drive slow"? The "this'll make it into a 50000 mile truck"? The "this'll make it into a 10000 mile truck"?
To make the truck last as long as humanly possible, the CCC is you and a tank of gas. To make it last for a reasonable time, at reasonable speeds, on reasonable roads, depends entirely on your definition of "reasonable".
Reply to
Tim Wescott
Your unladen weight should be on the registration. Subtract this from the weight of the passengers and fuel and what you have left is the maximum cargo weight.
In general terms a 3/4 ton truck can haul in its bed 1,500 lbs of cargo with full fuel and passengers.
If you go to the Dodge dealer you can ask them for a towing and loading guide.
Reply to
Roger Shoaf
"SteveB" wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@news.infowest.com:
Weigh the truck with you, your passenger(s), a full fuel tank and nothing in the bed.
Subtract that weight from 9900 lbs. and you'll get the total CCC of THAT truck.
Be advised that you should not be surprised if the Rear GAWR is 10K lbs. since both the 2500 and the 3500 SWR differ only in the number of spring leaves.
BTW, my '03.5 HO-CTD long-bed AWD dually had a build weight of 7350 but the scales usually show it at 8500+. 'Sa good thang it's got a 12K GVWR...
Reply to
RAM³
The owner's manual correctly stated that the payload was the amount the truck would carry in the bed including the weight of the occupants, fuel, baggage, etc. They nailed it. They just didn't use numbers.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
When I was talking with the Home Depot geek who was loading the truck, we were discussing payloads, GVWR's etc. He said that he thought the truck would tow 9,000. I told him that the figure of 13,800 stuck in my mind. He poo pooed the idea. Said a friend of his had a 1500 that was towing a 9,000# trailer "just fine". He said he couldn't imagine the 2500 would be that much higher than the 1500. The manager called Dodge in Vegas, and they came up with the 2150 number. I took 75% of that, and came up with 1600+. So, we put 1800# of pavers in there, then on the way home, stopped and bought another 240# of salt. It handled better than I thought, and the overhead computer was reading 17.2 for mileage. We need to make about five loads of these pavers from Vegas, as they are not available here locally. I think I'll stick to 1800, or 80 pieces @ 22# ea.
I would just like to know the actual real figure.
I'll do the weight thing, though.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
For one or two trips probably at least a ton. I screwed up hauling pavers home one evening. Luckily it was dark or I would have scared myself. HD said 2200# for a pallet of the pavers. So I figured my S-10 4x4 could haul a ton 5 miles. So we loaded up the pallet. Came out in the morning to see that the front wheels were barely on the ground. There 2200# for a pallet was for a small pallet they did not sell. Had as close as I can figure 4400#. Now my 3/4 Chevy Diesel could probably handle that load a lot better.
Reply to
Bill McKee
"SteveB" wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@news.infowest.com:
As a "rule of thumb", double the "ton" rating.
For example, my 1-ton dually is factory-claimed at 4414# in the bed.
Their GCWR was 23K. (The combined GVWRs of my truck and 38' fifth wheel is 26,100#. )
You should easily be able to carry 100 pieces (and possibly up to 120) depending upon how heavy you and your passenger are.
Do check your weights and tires -- your truck can, probably, carry a lot more than you ever thought!
Reply to
RAM³
I'd agree if you need to go 70 mph. If you're willing to drive 40 and have good tires, I routinely haul 6000 lb. in my old 93 ford 1 ton dually. Brakes ain't to good with this much weight.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Now _that_ sucks!
Older trucks (ca 1970) list that sort of thing on a plaque on the driver's side door -- does your truck have one? I know my 2000 Escort has one (I think it lists the payload in feathers...).
Reply to
Tim Wescott
On Tue, 10 Nov 2009 11:27:45 -0700, the infamous "SteveB" scrawled the following:
What does your local Dodge dealer say? They have the books for 'em.
I've found that I never break anything with stated payload +500lbs, at least on a Ford. It's probably true for the new Tundra, too. Dunno about the Dodges.
---------------------------------------------------- Thesaurus: Ancient reptile with excellent vocabulary ====================================================
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Let the Record show that "SteveB" on or about Tue, 10 Nov 2009 11:27:45 -0700 did write/type or cause to appear in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
How much do you want to haul, under what conditions, and how long do you wish to keep the vehicle? Will you be driving on flat interstates, or 17% grade dirt roads? I overloaded my pickup with bricks - once. But it was all flat, Highway, and the one time. Now my buddy on the other hand, regularly carries a half ton of stuff _all the time_. (If you need something, he'll have it "in the truck). As long as the springs don't break, and the clutch doesn't burn out when you're trying to get started, you're "okay".
Other wise, load up the vehicle with "a tank of gas, two passengers, and some luggage." weigh it, and subtract from GVWR. - pyotr filipivich We will drink no whiskey before its nine. It's eight fifty eight. Close enough!
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
I do knot know. If it was my truck, I'd phone the dealership near me. Phone three different dealership. Average the numbers and mimus 200 pounds to be safe.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon

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