Are all truck batteries created equal?



Here they use "Generator": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_station
jsw
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I was just going by what he said. :( , The most unusual intermittent dead battery problem that I found was a guy in Florida. Every once in a while his pickup would not start at the end of the day. Come to find out that his Lab which he took to work every day, very nice dog by the way, would lay down on the floorboards of the drivers side and rest his back on the brake pedal turning the brake lights on and discharging the battery.
John
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wrote:

Another of the more difficult to diagnose intermittent problems!!!
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

My first car (61 Ford Galaxy) had an odd electrical problem that would kill the battery, and several mechanics gave up on finding the cause. My first clue was that you could listen to the radio by turning on the parking lights, and turning on the left turn signal. The tail light had a dead short between the two filament terminals. It took me longer to replace the lamp and lens than it did to find the trouble. My uncle was upset, because he sold the car for $100, since no one could fix it. :)
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On Tue, 15 Feb 2011 21:42:45 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"

Not an odd accurrence at all. Quite classic in fact. Took just the right combination of actions to make the battery go dead though.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Autocar and Brockway trucks sometimes became a real nightmere. 24 volt start 12 volt run. All with positive ground.
John
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wrote:

An SAP switch solved virtually all the problems (except the problems with the switch) by running 2 batteries in parrallel all the time with a big 12 volt generator, and switching the second battery into a series string for starter only.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

136 lines - to add your four?
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Richard Lamb
email me: snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net
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wrote: ANd 27 of yours for absolutely nothing - which results in 4 more of absolutely nothing from me.
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On Tue, 15 Feb 2011 21:42:45 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"

Senior son had a 68 firebird that had to be driven every day to keep the battery charged. After several rescue calls, I traced the problem to a rusted out horn relay. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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Gerald Miller wrote:

We had a battery go low voltage over night, every night.. So once started we ran it ,all was ok. Then one night we disconnected the battery earth, in the morning reconnected it and it started fine.
So even with everything switched off there was a current draw somewhere. We put a meter on it and found it was 5 watts. Eventually we found it!! it was the boot light switch had stuck in the on position when it should have been off with the boot shut. one didnt see the light on in the day time!! as it was positioned up under the rear parcel shelf.
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wrote:

For all the colonials (and rebs) the Boot light is called a trunk light on the west side of the big pond.
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Gerald Miller wrote:

The battery in my 66 GTO would be dead if it sat more than a few days. That turned out to be a bad battery cable. The insulation had turned to carbon, and was draining the battery. It ran trough a metal tube to keep it away from the engine, so the damage wasn't visible until it was removed from the car. The new cables were made from #1 welding cable, and the electrical system had about 5 microamps leakage after the repairs.
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On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 09:30:38 -0600, Ignoramus14196

Red Optima. You won't go wrong, but your wallet will feet the pinch.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I currently have a yelow optima battery in my diesel Vitars. Never had one so good. Best ever.
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On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 09:30:38 -0600, Ignoramus14196

Gel cell batteries are just lead-acid batteries that have the electrolyte gelled by adding silica-gel (I think). As they are sealed batteries they should be charged at a lower voltage to avoid over heating which could cause excessive gassing and high pressure inside the sealed case.
Trojan Batteries recommends a maximum charging voltage of 2.35 - 2.40 per cell or 14.1 - 14.4 volts for a 12 volt battery..
While I cannot quote references, my experience is that few, if any, common automobile alternators will produce a higher voltage then is safe for a gel-cell.
As an aside - a gel cell's real advantage is that if you turn them upside down they don't leak acid all over your new levis.
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Ignoramus14196 wrote:

I would not really trust the dash gauge too much when a couple tenths of a volt is critical.
John
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Ignoramus14196 wrote:

I used to work for a guy who made industrial battery chargers, but that was 10-15 years ago and technology might have changed, but I wouldn't use a gel cell (unless it's rated for "cold cranking amps") in a motor-starting application.
For a house battery in an RV, they're wonderful, but they're not optimized for the hundreds of amps or so it takes to start a motor. Unless, of course, they've come up with a new design. If I understand correctly, a gel cell isn't the same as a "sealed lead-acid."
Good Luck! Rich
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VRLA_battery
jsw
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On Tue, 15 Feb 2011 00:21:38 -0800, Rich Grise

Real "gell cells" are very few and far between today - technology has left them behind.
Most are now starved electrolyte AGM (absorbed glass mat)
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