Barbecue Grill burner replacements

On Sun, 28 Mar 2010 14:25:59 -0500, the infamous Ignoramus8246


I haven't tried that but don't doubt that it works well. It sure would beat having to fill my 20lb cylinder once every year. ;) And that beats the hell out of the 14oz cylinders.
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I don't know about that - but we have been burning propane for 39 years. We had to get out of college to get away from the bag method of cooking outdoors.
Brother-in-law had Natl' gas and it seemed to give a taste to the food. Might be the specific source of gas.
Propane is now multi-fuel but seems to be fine without taste.
We cook 12 months of the year - and have cooked turkeys, cakes and pies. We, when young lost the oven in the house - fix it three times and the same unit keeps crapping out. Save, save, cook everything outside - save - buy top shelf oven for the little woman - install it - it was nice - cook most outside.
From that time on, she and I cook outside - she does normal, I do special or complex. I smoke, she doesn't. Got and edge now :-)
Martin
Ignoramus8246 wrote:

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Larry, what planet do you get your charcoal from?
Charcoal burns almost completely odorless, except for any deliberate addition of un-charred wood for flavor.
You weren't really talking about the smell of "lighter fluid", were you?
REAL charcoal grillers would _never_ use a petroleum on their coals. It's simple as heck to build a quick charcoal fire without it. Under ten minutes, max, to a full bed of coals. It takes that long to heat up a "stink box" (propane grill).
I'm partial to natural chunk charcoal, adding "flavor wood" as necessary, usually in a cast iron smoke box.
Chunk charcoal lights faster, has no heavy residues like those from briquettes, burns much hotter (and faster, sorry), and generally gives a more predictable taste. It is easy and fun to make, too.
Larry, if you can't tell the difference between propane-cooked meat and that cooked on charcoal, you probably should visit an ENT (ORL) and figure out why your taste buds aren't working right.
LLoyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> writes:

How do you manage 10 minutes? Takes me 45, using the "chimney" style lighters.

Around here, the natural charcoal is so variable I went back to Kingsford to get predictability.

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Which, since it's mostly coal dust, etc, means it (predictably) takes 45 minutes to light. I've been able to manage 15-20 with nothing more than matches, newspaper and/or the charcoal bag while traveling (limited to tools on hand - not many), with the actual charcoal made from wood. Where I've been able to find it bagged I've not had the problems of great variability that some folks are reporting. When last in the Keys that was not-esoteric-at-all Publix (big Florida/Southeastern grocery chain), for anyone in their market area.
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about Sun, 28 Mar 2010 12:02:40 -0700 did write/type or cause to appear in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    I do like charcoal broiled. Too bad it takes so long to get going, and for one person - too much effort. I have a very nice Propane Grill, light it up, and while I gather the makings, it heats up - burns the grill clean B-) - et violia.     But I still like the charcoal fire. Maybe I'll make a fire pit this summer,then I can do more. - pyotr filipivich We will drink no whiskey before its nine. It's eight fifty eight. Close enough!
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Normally, the "natural" briquets burn quite a bit hotter, so I'd assume home-made charcoal would do the same. I used to use the natural briquets, but it's been a lont time since I've found them with a consistent size. A sack full of fines and one large tree limb seems to be about the norm...
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re: "I'm trying to figure out why anybody would go to all this trouble for a gas grill"
Because 12 minutes after I started the grill this morning I had a nice medium steak alongside 2 over-easy eggs and some whole grain toast - cooked on the grill and side burner.
Because 10 minutes after I decide to have a burger or sausage, I'm eating said burger or sausage.
Because I need the whole grill and a little more temperature control when cooking pizza on the grill.
Because I use my grill at least one a week, even in mid-winter, for "single servings".
Because grilled pineapple is a great - and quick - appetizer even when the rest of the meal is being cooked in the kitchen.
I could go on, and I'm not trying to convince you that gas is better than charcoal, I'm just trying to help you "figure out why anybody would go to all this trouble for a gas grill".
My Weber kettle is under the deck and comes out quite often, but for ease of use and quick-turnaround, a gas grill sure is convenient. That's why we "go to the trouble."
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"DerbyDad03" wrote in message

I have been thinking about doing this any cooking hints?
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wrote:

The general concept shown here is correct, except that with practice you can get a golden brown crust, not the charred wreck they ended up with.
The "trick" is to brown one side the crust, which will stiffen it up, then flip it over, put your toppings on the browned side and then brown the other side while the toppings cook.
http://allrecipes.com/HowTo/Grilling-Pizza-Video/Detail.aspx
I always brush my dough with olive oil before grilling and I remove my crust while adding the toppings. That way the toppings have more time to cook while the crust browning.
Google around for topping suggestions. The possibilities are endless. You can't get pretty exotic.
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Ummm... I've had pizza cooked in a backyard wood-fired pizza oven; we did it by tossing the dough, putting toppings on while it was on a pizza peel, and then the pizza was slid into the oven (and later, of course, slid out).
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Joe Pfeiffer wrote:

There is a local Italian restaurant + pizza place that cooks everything over wood fires. When the wind is blowing the wrong way, you can smell it for miles. :(
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From my experience with walking by good restaurants, I think you mis-spelled :)
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Joe Pfeiffer wrote:

Who said it was good? Do you like the smell of burning oak and pizza crust?
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If the crust is burning, no. If it's cooking, yes.
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Joe Pfeiffer wrote:

it smells like pieces of the crust are left in the oven, till they completely burn away. :(
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FWIW, has anyone considered a fully ceramic grate?
One approach would be to bond pre-made ceramic rods with an ordinary pottery clay, which could be fired as an assembly, then moved as a unit.
Another would be to cast/mould a grate-like assembly in a sheet, dry, fire, glaze, and use it both as the heat diffuser and as a food grill in a gas- fired grill (or charcoal).
'Tis hardly metalworking, but metals don't usually hold up well in that environment.
LLoyd
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

ordinary ceramics don't like to go through quartz inversion temp very quickly (either up or down). i'd bet they'd self-destruct pretty quickly.
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quickly.
I've got some ceramic support rods for heat-treating that pay no never mind to cycling a thousand degrees in one or two minutes. They were once "honing rods" I re-purposed.
I really don't know what's in them, but they can go from cold to bright cherry red in seconds, and never even breathe hard.
They don't look "glazed", per se, but they're polished, and most likely not very porous.
Just from knowing about milling media, I'm betting they're high-alumina ceramics.
LLoyd
LLoyd
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On Sat, 27 Mar 2010 21:32:21 -0600, Joe Pfeiffer

I think my neighbour has it figured right - he picked up a BBQ someone had set out to the curb, stripped out the burners, and uses charcoal on the rock grid. Good cast aluminium housing on a decent stand, works great! Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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