Bristol Alloys

Anyone use certified material from Bristol Alloys in
anything critical?
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Bristol Alloys Inc. and its president, James Bullick,
admitted in court last week to selling metal that had not
been heat-treated to be used in Virginia-class submarines to
meet contractual requirements.
The major fraud charge dealt with parts and materials
associated with Virginia-class submarines, but the Navy's
investigation has also focused on Los Angeles-, Seawolf- and
Ohio-class submarines, as well as the aircraft carrier
Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78).
Bristol Alloys, a metal and steel parts broker, has been in
business in Fairless Hills, Pa., since 2002.
Bristol Alloys created numerous fraudulent heating-test
certifications supposedly issued by another company and
counterfeit certified material test reports instead of
complying with the Navy's requirements in the purchase
orders from Garvey from about 2004 to the fall of 2009,
according to court documents.
Bullick faces a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison, a $5
million fine and mandatory restitution at his sentencing on
Jan. 31, according to the Office of the U.S. Attorney for
the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. The company also faces
a possible $5 million fine and mandatory restitution.
-- Unka George (George McDuffee)
..............................
The past is a foreign country;
they do things differently there.
L. P. Hartley (1895-1972), British author.
The Go-Between, Prologue (1953).
Reply to
F. George McDuffee
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I wonder if detailed enough records have been kept to figure out exactly where this stuff was used, and how hard it will be to replace.
Reply to
rangerssuck
Just 10 years for this, it is shocking.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus21476
I wonder how many lives depended on the material being up to spec
Reply to
raamman
Yeah, the USSR knew how to deal with people like that!
Paul
Reply to
KD7HB
Falsifying materials going into a US sub, should be executed for treason.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
In the "old days" he would be lucky to die with any teeth still remaining. That said, they had a lot of quality problems, caused by other things, such as rushing things into production and cutting corners.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus21476
Exactly. For sure so, if anyone dies from it.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus21476
They should take him water skiing, behind a submarine. :(
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
How barbaric! They don't even execute people for murder anymore.
But being a bit less facetious, it appears that the current U.S. (I don't know anything about Europe) penalties for crime does not prove a deterrent. Perhaps it is time for a change?
Cheers,
Brice
Reply to
Bruce
Assign him to measure hull contraction on a test dive.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I'd have considered that treason and hung the asshole.
-- Experience is a good teacher, but she send in terrific bills. -- Minna Thomas Antrim
Reply to
Larry Jaques
=========== How about the 11 people that did die in the BP rig explosion because of the cheap cement Halliburton used
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the BP refinery exlosion in Texas City in 2005 that killed 15 and maimed scores more?
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-- Unka George (George McDuffee) .............................. The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there. L. P. Hartley (1895-1972), British author. The Go-Between, Prologue (1953).
Reply to
F. George McDuffee
Or to clean the torpedo tubes while sbmerged...
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
I once worked in a small start up that had a Russian technician. There was a problem with one of the written assembly procedures. As the engineer, I was showing him the new method before the new procedure was written. He was aghast. He said in the USSR if anyone deliberately deviated from the written procedure in any way, for good or bad, he would be prosecuted for sabotage. Of course in that case particular case, sticking with the old procedure until the new one was written and ECO'd would have meant building many bad assemblies that would have had to have been re-worked.
Reply to
anorton
Each and every part I have ever made for a sub has a S/N and paper trail. Makes it relatively easy to trace however it will be expensive and time consuming to replace.
Surprising to me they could get away with such a thing for an extended period of time. Even with material certs provided by suppliers we would send out random samples to a disinterested third party lab and have them inspected, verified and certified.
Reply to
noneya
With luck that means that their stuff was actually what they said it was, but they didn't do the testing and certification they were supposed to do int heir contract. From the user'r POV, a better thing, but since the sampling was random, no one could know for sure that it was ALL properly done.
Stuart
Reply to
Stuart Wheaton
That's not what the Navy says- see #3.
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Looks like they reached a plea bargain with the gov't, the company is out of business and the principal(s) will have all their personal assets stripped and spend some quality jail time.
Doesn't seem like enough. The renewal documents I just signed that allow access to certain sensitive items explicitly expose me to fines of up to $2M a _day_ and 10yrs in prison, and that's just for non-compliance, let alone premeditated criminal fraud.
Reply to
Spehro Pefhany
Sure, "they" do.
You're suggesting ending penalties for crime?
I don't see capital punishment as a deterrent, but I do see it as preferable to warehousing killers until they die of old age. I consider locking them in a cage till they die to be "cruel and unusual punishment", which is banned by our Constitution.
David
Reply to
David R. Birch

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