Car tire balancing at home possible?

That'd do it, alright. Those were different times, weren't they?
-- When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary. -- Thomas Paine
(comparing Paine to the current CONgress )
Reply to
Larry Jaques
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OTOH I flew first class.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
When I was flying to and from Sandy Eggo to Oakland monthly, I flew Southwest's cattle class. Overstuffed 737s with seats 6" closer together than other models. That was fine, though. Prices were $39.95 for the round trip air fare and the flights took just under an hour.
To go around the world or cross-country, business or first class would be my preference, but cattle class would be my budget.
-- When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary. -- Thomas Paine
(comparing Paine to the current CONgress )
Reply to
Larry Jaques
If it's speed dependent it probably isn't balance. More likely to be some slop in one of the linkages in the steering or suspension. Balance will give vibration at any speed, but more rapid at higher speed.
One local tire shop does a complimentary suspension diagnosis whenever you buy a set of tires. They dont' do repairs, they just do a diagnosis, and if they find an alignment problem or worn parts they give you a list of things that need fixing, which you can then take to a repair shop to get fixed.
Reply to
J. Clarke
ood quality. I ordered one (this would be about 1982). The one they sent wa= s a whole differnt design, and was useless. I doubt things got much better.= Google shows them.
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s.com... On Monday, July 30, 2012 7:31:46 AM UTC-5, stryped wrote: > Is the= re a way to balance wheels at home without a computer baalancer? I > have s= een at harbor freight kits designed for motorcycle tires, bubble > balancer= s and the like. I have heard bubble balancers are not acurate. > Does anyon= e have any idea on "good" redneck ways to do this? I dont live > near a sho= p. (Amish country). I have also heard of people putting some > sort of rubb= er toy pellets inside a tire. Supposedly as the tire spins > these pellets = locate themselves at the appropriate places centrifically to > balance the = tire. I assume this is similar to the liquid tire balancer you > can purcha= se for large trucks. I appreciate any advice. Buy the bubble balancer. This= used to be the way all tires were balanced until the spin balancer became = the idiot proof operator method. You still need a supply of either self sti= ck or rim clamped weights. ignator
Yup, that's the one I have from ~1978. I also worked a summer for a Bondag= franchise, doing flat repair and new tire installation, 1974ish, bubble ba= lancers were the only method available, and this worked even with large tir= es, and highway speeds of 75 MPH. ignator
Reply to
fredhababorbitz
On Mon, 30 Jul 2012 12:57:53 -0400 in rec.crafts.metalworking, "Jim Wilkins" wrote,
When I need a nice hard pointy thing I usually make it from the 1/8" shank of a broken carbide circuit board drill.
Reply to
David Harmon
I use change tires for a living and learned a easy trick to balance a tire if you lower the air pressure to 10 - 15 pounds drive for about 30 miles the tires will balance themselves I haven't payed for tire balence in 20 years
Reply to
gardneracb
smells like the south end of northbound male bovine to me
Reply to
Karl Townsend
I'm, calling BS. As a mechanic since the late sixties.
Reply to
clare
Hey Clare , have you tried microbeads ? A guy I know swears they work just swell , I'd think they would pick up the heavy spot and make things worse .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
I know a guy who tried them in his 33 inch tires on a jeep and he swore "at" them. Theoretically they should work for slight imballance. I used to have a set of self balancing plates that boted on between the drum and rim on my '53 Coronet. They were effective and used a tube of "shot" on the outer circumference. Good for up to about an ounce of inbalance> The beeds could do the fine balance after doing a rough "bubble balance" Bubble balancers are readily available at a decent price and used to be the only way to balance a tire before spin balancers came along (on-car first, then the electronic off-car dynamic balancers in common use today)
Reply to
clare
SO much wisdom from AOL, once again.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
But it works great on my bicycle!
Reply to
Tom Gardner
I'll be mounting a tire on Mr Motorcycle in a few days , and will be using a static type balancer . Basically a straight rod thru the hub , with a pair of bearings on the outboard ends . Bearings to be supported by a pair of jackstands . Gotta get the centering cones machined ...
Reply to
Terry Coombs
A parallel is the spin dryer cycle in a washing machine. If one has a large number of small items, or a mix of large and small, within limits it will self balance. This was the great discovery that made spin dryers practical.
As for automobile tires, one would thing that every bump in the road would tend to de-balance things, so there would be some kind of settling out effect.
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joe Gwinn
That's the something new I learned today ! Thanks Joe .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
Just remember to split the weights between sides to attempt to override any dynamic balance problems. It helps, but doesn't fix 'em.
Use open ball or taper bearings with 5w oil on them for the most sensitivity.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
What, AOL "wisdom"?
Reply to
Larry Jaques
I have seen at harbor freight kits designed for motorcycle tires, bubble ba lancers and the like. I have heard bubble balancers are not acurate.
e near a shop. (Amish country).
ide a tire. Supposedly as the tire spins these pellets locate themselves at the appropriate places centrifically to balance the tire. I assume this is similar to the liquid tire balancer you can purchase for large trucks.
What a dick-head!!
Reply to
wata3001
good quality. I ordered one (this would be about 1982). The one they sent was a whole differnt design, and was useless. I doubt things got much bette r. Google shows them.
formatting link
Chri
ups.com... On Monday, July 30, 2012 7:31:46 AM UTC-5, stryped wrote: > Is t here a way to balance wheels at home without a computer baalancer? I > have seen at harbor freight kits designed for motorcycle tires, bubble > balanc ers and the like. I have heard bubble balancers are not acurate. > Does any one have any idea on "good" redneck ways to do this? I dont live > near a s hop. (Amish country). I have also heard of people putting some > sort of ru bber toy pellets inside a tire. Supposedly as the tire spins > these pellet s locate themselves at the appropriate places centrifically to > balance th e tire. I assume this is similar to the liquid tire balancer you > can purc hase for large trucks. I appreciate any advice. Buy the bubble balancer. Th is used to be the way all tires were balanced until the spin balancer becam e the idiot proof operator method. You still need a supply of either self s tick or rim clamped weights. ignator
ag franchise, doing flat repair and new tire installation, 1974ish, bubble balancers were the only method available, and this worked even with large t ires, and highway speeds of 75 MPH.
1992 I traveled to Road Atlanta to watch the SCCA Runoffs. Wandering around the paddock I stopped at the big Goodyear tent. They had 4 or 5 custom rim -clamp tire machines going non-stop. Each mounted tire went to the balancer guy - who was using a plain bubble balancer on wheels that would see 180 m ph that weekend. I question one of them as to whether bubble balancing was sufficient for the purpose. He said it was more than good enough. I stopped at the smaller Yokohama rig a little later and noticed they wer e using a small, simple Snap-On spin balancer. I commented that the Godyear people were happy with their bubble balancers. The rep said "Yeah, and a lot of those guys running Goodyear bring their tires straight over to us to re-balance."
I used to keep a spin balancer at the shop for occasional use. Now I just have a bubble balancer, and I can't remember the last time I used it.
Reply to
Rex

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