Cast iron corn sheller

Recently bought a Black Hawk model 1903-A corn sheller at a flea market. Not particularly rare since they were widely sold as late as
the 50s. Better ones on Ebay for less. Well, more when you include shipping... Actually want a working corn sheller so drilled out all the corroded bolts and plan to have the cast parts sand blasted. Only light surface rust in contrast to the hardware. Guessing some kind of galvanic corrosion?
Unless someone here has a better idea, plan to 'season' it like a skillet. Three or four rounds of vegetable oil / bake at 350 degrees F while the wife is baking potatoes should be enough. Do not want to paint it and will keep it in doors.
Have sourced most of the replacement hardware except the spring and wooden handle. May end up making a handle though will keep looking for something with a 5/16 through hole. No luck with a spring locally, found some on-line that will work but sold in sets of ten:( Not tried McMaster or MSC yet since I do not have an account with either. Which one is easiest to buy from as an individual?
Should I mask off the tapered spindle and bore? Already has some wear, thinking that smooth lightly rusted surfaces will wear less than rough freshly blasted ones. Has an oil hole but may try Vaseline since it is food safe and less likely to drip or sling out.
Trivia I found researching my new acquisition. Do not try to eat an entire mincemeat pie! Apparently it is what killed the inventor A H Patch.
--
William

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On 7/7/2019 7:15 PM, William Bagwell wrote:

sandblasting . Takes off less of what you want to keep .
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wrote:


Bake or just let dry? Think I have some linseed oil somewhere... My son played around with electrolysis a few years ago, will ask if he still has all the stuff. If not will stop in and see the sand blast guy on the way home from work.
--
William

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On 7/8/2019 5:34 AM, William Bagwell wrote:


Baking can't hurt , just keep the temps fairly low - you want the oil to polymerize , not burn off . See if you can find true boiled linseed oil , a lot of what's out there is chemically treated and not actually boiled . Has something to do with the above mentioned polymerizing . FWIW , even veggie oil will polymerize , that's what forms that nonstick surface in cast iron pans .
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On 08/07/2019 13:58, Terry Coombs wrote:



And make sure you read the safety instructions about disposing of any rag you use to rub it on with, not everyone is aware the stuff can self ignite under the right circumstances.
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The fire danger is specific to certain "polyunsaturated" vegetable oils, the ones used to finish wood and make oil paint and linoleum. Animal oils are more"saturated" and less susceptible to oxidation, and the chemically different mineral oils aren't; they do fine in a hot engine. I had to explain this to my concerned boss when I was assigned to manage a machine shop with an enclosed hazardous waste container.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drying_oil
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/saturated-fat-good-or-bad
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On Mon, 8 Jul 2019 15:54:50 +0100, David Billington

Have personally witnessed the beginning stages, rags were smoldering but not yet on fire when I noticed. Forget exactly which oil was involved.
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On Mon, 08 Jul 2019 06:34:02 -0400, William Bagwell


The trend these days is to season with flax seed oil, which is what linseed oil is. The difference is that the flax seed oil, bought from a food supplier, is edible. Boiled linseed oil is not. It is in fact poisonous. It contains metallic dryers that help with the polymerization of the linseed oil. Health food stores sell linseed oil and if applied in very thin layers and then baked so that it polymerizes quickly you should be able to get a pretty good several layer finish in a fairly short time. Eric
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On Mon, 08 Jul 2019 09:07:51 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:


You beat me to it. Yup, on all counts. "Boiled" linseed oil is not boiled at all. Flax seed oil, applied in baked layers as you suggest, will make your cast-iron cookware as slippery as it gets.
--
Ed Huntress

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On Mon, 08 Jul 2019 09:07:51 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:


We should point out though, unless you plan to lick the corn sheller, ordinary "boiled" linseed should work just fine. d8-)
--
Ed Huntress

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On 7/8/2019 11:07 AM, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:


mention chemicals used in some linseed oils .
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wrote:



You are correct, what you call true boiled linseed oil, which is truly just boiled linseed oil, is commonly called "Stand Oil", and is non-toxic. And though a common additive is not that common is stores. Where do you get yours? Eric
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Hobby store "music wire" is good for winding custom springs, preferably on a back-geared lathe. Flat spring stock can be obtained from tape measures and small engine recoil starters. Stainless steel TIG rod also works and withstands corrosive conditions although its yield point is lower so you can't just copy the old spring. I use it to restore higher-quality garden hose spray nozzles.
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On Sun, 07 Jul 2019 20:15:14 -0400, William Bagwell

A couple of small points: The steel bolts rust more because the rust on steel is not self-protective. Cast iron -- the cheaper, softer, and weaker the better -- has a small self-protecting effect because the remaining graphite granules bind pretty tightly with the rust and minimize further oxidation.
Sand-blasting cast iron is not always a good plan. It tends to smear over the rust that is in the pores. Indoors, it probably won't be a problem.
The "equipment" for electrolytic de-rusting is a bucket, a battery charger, some unplated steel sheet or rebar, and some washing soda. I do it all the time -- I have a ton of inhereted tools, and a lot of rust. I prefer it over almost everything else. I do use hydrochloric (muriatic) acid in certain cases, but the steel *can* rust like crazy if you don't protect it afterwards. Cliff Hubrich, former member and chemistry guy, said that it left a salt in any pores, including the textured surface left after you de-rust a very rusty piece. For some reason, this doesn't seem to be true on EMT for which you used the hydrochloric to remove the galvanizing, before brazing or welding. Don't ask me why, but maybe because it's smooth and didn't have any rust to begin with.
--
Ed Huntress

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On Mon, 08 Jul 2019 12:04:38 -0400, Ed Huntress

Memory is starting to click! Cliff said it was trying to *neutralize* the surface after the acid bath, by using washing soda or baking soda, that produced the salt. In fact, I tried that with an ancient pair of pliers, and they started rusting again in two days.
--
Ed Huntress

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On Thu, 11 Jul 2019 06:30:11 -0400, William Bagwell

snip

Bueno. Molasses is another good rust remover.
snip

Yup.
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Got my de-rusting tank set up last night and it seems to be working great! Plastic tote big enough to hold the two largest pieces. 3/4 cup of washing soda in approximately 7 gallons of water. (You Tube videos were all over the place on how much. From "too much will not work" to "the more the better".) Charger on 6 amp 12 volts. Ran it for a few hours and unplugged it overnight since my charger seemed to be getting slightly hotter than it does charging a battery.
About four more hours this morning and pulled them out. Most of the red rust was gone and /some/ of the black rust scrubbed off with a scrubbing pad in the sink. Back in and bubbling more vigorously than before. Picked up a new wire brush today, sure it will work better Think my goal is all the red rust gone and not worry about any remaining black rust that will not come off easily?
Found some flax seed oil so will try that in a few days after all the parts are done.
--
William

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On Sunday, July 21, 2019 at 3:58:37 PM UTC-4, William Bagwell wrote:

It sounds like you're on top of it, William. About the black rust: It's act ually considered to be somewhat protective. Some of the conversion coatings actually convert to that black rust, which has a common name I can't think of at the moment. You don't have to get rid of all of it before applying w hatever final treatment you have in mind.
Aside -- my desktop computer crashed; it may be the final push I need to ge t off of Usenet altogether. There is so little left of interest, and so muc h trash, that it really isn't worth the time. So if I don't reply, it's not because I'm ignoring anyone. It's because I've found better ways to use my time.
Good luck with your derusting. The electrolytic method is a really valuable tool to have in your toolbox.
--
Ed Huntress


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Say what? The guy who invented it used to eat a big spoonful every day, fanatic about it he was. What might make Vaseline(tm) not food-safe?
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada

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writes:

The production machinery?
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