Cleaning solvent

At paint stores and the paint aisle at big-boxes at an insane retail markup. Or WD-40 if you like it perfumed.
Diesel fuel is close enough for degreasing applications.
Filling stations sell it from pumps in rural, cold climates for heaters.
Reply to
Richard J Kinch
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Some gas stations sell kerosene, we have a Speedway nearby that does it. I normally keep a 5 gallon container with Kero for starting fires in my firepit, and cleaning parts.
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> >> Let me ask the dumb question, >> where do you buy kerosene? I would think Ace or Home Depot, as they >> sell the kerosene heaters. Is that right? And is kerosene a good >> cleaner? > > At paint stores and the paint aisle at big-boxes at an insane retail > markup. Or WD-40 if you like it perfumed. > > Diesel fuel is close enough for degreasing applications. > > Filling stations sell it from pumps in rural, cold climates for heaters.
Reply to
Ignoramus25365
The last carb I cleaned I used Simple Green in the Harbor Freight heated ultrasonic cleaner. After a 10 min cycle in the cleaner I blew everything clear and dry with compressed air, reassembled and the formerly non-op carb worked perfectly.
Reply to
Pete C.
Odorless lamp oil aka kerosene from your hardware store. Works, doesn't stink like real kero or diesel. /mark
Reply to
Mark F
Pete, what mix ratio did you use for the Simple Green and how well did it clean? Did it remove the black carbon that's usually in the barrel(s) of the carb?
Reply to
aarcuda69062
I don't know how often you might want a really clean part, but the auto parts stores sell a gallon can of carb cleaner that REALLY works. the motor heads call it "boiling out the carb" to use it. You don't heat the stuff, though. The gallon can, like a paint can, has a basket inside that you toss the parts into. Read the label. Looks like brand new when done. Costs $30. Lasts for many years with the lid on tight.
The auto stores also have less flammable solvents. One used to be called "Stoddard Solvent".
Kerosene won't blow you up, but it sure is flammable. I agree with another poster that diesel fuel works okay, just not quite as active as kerosene. BTW, the diesel works well as a lubricant for cutting alumimum. You'll pay through the nose, I think, if you buy Kerosene at a hardware-type store.
Cleaning the exterior of engines: Gunk, at the auto store. Couple of bucks a can.
I'd seriously avoid using gasoline around parts made of iron and steel, at least. Acetone can't be much better. Wear gloves. I like the orange colored "refinishing gloves" sold at Menard's and other places in the Paint Aisle.
Take care, Pete Stanaitis ---------------
SteveB wrote:
Reply to
spaco
I got some parts I need to clean. I have gas and acetone, and a quart or so
of mineral spirits.
What's a good solvent for cleaning the exterior of carburetors, engine
parts, etc, in a sink or tub with a parts brush that won't eat your brain
out or blow you up? I have heard kerosene. Let me ask the dumb question,
where do you buy kerosene? I would think Ace or Home Depot, as they sell
the kerosene heaters. Is that right? And is kerosene a good cleaner?
Wish I had one of those parts washing sinks (SD?), but I'd use it about
twice a year. Sure are handy, though.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
Well for a decent non flammable cleaner in a wash tub Simple Green works pretty well. I use it in my big tanks as well as in the ultrasonic cleaner I use for carbs and injectors. The acetone works good for cleaning carbs BUT you have to make sure that no rubber parts are in there.
Kerosene can be purchased at most places that sell gasoline and diesel fuel (which also makes a good BUT smelly cleaner) However all the petroleum cleaners STINK and are flammable.
Reply to
Steve W.
Not Pete, but I use Sg in the cleaner as well. Does a real nice job in a conventional tank and in an ultrasonic I have as well. Mine gets mixed about 1SG-10Water. In the big tank it gets most of the crap. Real baked on grease is kind of tough. The carbon in the carbs comes off in the ultrasonic though.
Reply to
Steve W.
Simple Green.
And Id give you 2 washers with pumps and heaters for free if you were close by.
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
K1 is right at $6 a gallon here. From the bulk plant.
Ive had to change my shop heat over to propane because of the cost and live with the increased humitidy
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Powdered automatic dishwasher detergent in hot water, high concentration.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
The best way to clean a carb (or most other small parts) is with a pail of carb cleaner. The best of those, in my opinion, are the ones based on cresylic acid.
For washing with a brush, kerosene or diesel will work, but mineral spirits works a bit better. In a parts washer Safety-Kleen is a bit safer, firewise, and does a very good job.
Reply to
Jim Levie
Mineral spirits or kero with some Gunk SC.
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This is meant to be used with a solvent like mineral spirits, kero, diesel fuel etc and it works very well.
About the only difference between diesel and kero is that diesel stinks more. It also has road tax, but they sell so much of it it is usually still cheaper than kero even with tax. #2 fuel oil also works but it really stinks and it's not as easy to buy in small quantity.
I use mineral spirits. Less flammible, not as stinky, cheaper than milk by the gallon and it works fer me.
Reply to
Don Foreman
Look up Ed's red cleaner on the web. I skip the acetone and don't watch proportions exactly - 1 ATF. 1 kerosene, 1 mineral spirits.
Ed's Red cleaner:
1 part Dexron II, IIe or III ATF, GM Spec. D-20265 or later.
1 part Kerosene - deodorized, K1
1 part Aliphatic Mineral Spirits, Fed. Spec. TT-T-2981F, CAS #64741-49-9, or may substitute "Stoddard Solvent", CAS #8052-41-3, or equivalent, (aka "Varsol")
1 part Acetone, CAS #67-64-1.
(Optional up to 1 lb. of Lanolin, Anhydrous, USP per gallon, OK to substitute Lanolin, Modified, Topical Lubricant, from the drug store)
Reply to
Karl Townsend
On Tue, 18 Mar 2008 21:38:29 -0600, with neither quill nor qualm, "Pete C." quickly quoth:
Didn't the ultrasound shake loose some of the pressed-in brass orifices? I'd be hard pressed to try that option for that reason.
-- Death is more universal than life; everyone dies but not everyone lives. -- A. Sachs
Reply to
Larry Jaques
On Wed, 19 Mar 2008 02:09:29 -0500, with neither quill nor qualm, Jim Levie quickly quoth:
I agree, wholeheartedly. B-9 Chem Dip (no longer legal in CA) is stinky stuff, but it works -extremely- well for those minute passages which really need cleanout. For aerosols, Berryman's B-12 is tops, and it can be used for starting fluid as well.
Yes, Safety-Kleen is a very good kero substitute.
-- Death is more universal than life; everyone dies but not everyone lives. -- A. Sachs
Reply to
Larry Jaques
On Tue, 18 Mar 2008 20:37:54 -0800, with neither quill nor qualm, "SteveB" quickly quoth:
If it doesn't eat your brain, it won't clean the most intimate passages in the carburetor body. Cresols rule!
-- Death is more universal than life; everyone dies but not everyone lives. -- A. Sachs
Reply to
Larry Jaques
I don't recall the exact ratio, fairly strong like 25% SG. No carbon in this particular one, it was from a small pressure washer engine.
Reply to
Pete C.
Not in a little pressure washer carb.
Reply to
Pete C.

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