cold liquid metal

Hello, I was just wondering of anyone could offer any information at all on cold liquid bronze, brass, or copper. Something that a catalyst could be added to and it could be poured with out
heat? Iam not even sure if this is possible so any info at all would be great .
Thanx Rob
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I'm sorry, at room temperature these metals are solid. Nor can you dissolve a metal using a catalyst. There are liquids (acids) that will dissolve metals but this surely isn't what you want.
What are you trying to do? There are very low-melting-temp alloys out there that will melt below the temp of boiling water, but they still require some heat. And these look sort of silvery but not like bronze, brass or copper.
Grant
Rob Van wrote:

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Not sure where you are going with this. There are metal filled epoxies that look kinda like metal when finished. Grizzly used to sell them. not sure if they are in the new catalog.
Also, there is a type of "fimo" like clay that can be formed and baked off to leave a mostly metal substrate. The shrinkage is incredible..on the order of 30 percent but it does act and look like metal when finished. Bakes off in the oven like fimo. It was available from some jewelry supply stores..one that comes to mind is TSR in Seattle. Also probably in the back of the Lapidary Journal.
And finally, there was a kids jewelry casting kit that used colored low melting temperature alloys available at one time. Sometimes you can find the kits still on clearance at toy stores..or sometimes just re-fills of the metal. Similar to the low temperature fixturing alloys but with some sort of "brassy" color added.
Details of what you want to do may help
Koz
Rob Van wrote:

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Rob Van wrote:

Are you talking about epoxy products?
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Rob Van wrote: Hello, I was just wondering of anyone could offer any information at all on cold liquid bronze, brass, or copper. ^^^^^^^^^^^^ This would give new meaning to the term "cold fusion," but I am afraid, with either meaning, it ain't happenin'.
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JB Weld, Maybe.

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Hey, weren't you here looking for invisible aluminum a while ago?
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Ted Bennett wrote...

Aye, that's *transparent* aluminum, kiptin.
Scotty
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I've got a chunk of transparent aluminium. It's not very expensive, in the artificial form. Transparent sapphire/AlO2.
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I have some cold metal that pours nicely at room temperature, but it isn't bronze and it stays liquid.
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wrote:

I once used gallium in a magnesium electrolytic cell for a tracer. Melted in my hand. IIRC, it had the widest liquid temperature range of any element. I don't think it's cheap or easy to get, though.
Pete Keillor
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Rob
There is a thing called a Periodic table that has all of the elements listed on it. Usually they give the material properties such as melting point, boiling point, density, name, symbol, atomic weight, atomic number, etc.
Basic high school chemistry information.
A metal that is liquid at room temperature is mercury. It freezes at -38.8C
Bob
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On 13 Jan 2004 09:06:03 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@advant.com (Bonza) wrote:

How about a sodium/potassium alloy that is liquid at room temp?
Dave
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On Tue, 13 Jan 2004 11:27:56 -0600, David A. Webb

Just make sure it is used in a vacuum?
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Never mind that it's more than likely gonna be explosive at "room humidity"! :)
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http://www.webelements.com /
Yeah but you can't hold that in your hand for very long before it dissolves right through it ;)
Tim
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Heavily loaded urethane and polyester resins are pretty common in the sculpture world. See http://www.sculpt.com/technotes/COLDCAST.htm for an explanation of how to make a pretty decent casting with Smooth-On urethane resins and powdered metal.
Luminore makes a castable and a spray finish thant can be polished like metal. http://www.luminore.com/index2nd.html The big bronzes at the Luxor and MGM Grand are sprayed with Luminore. It is not cheap though. They deal mostly with professional applicators.
Someone posted
Rob Van wrote:

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I think you're talking about filled epoxies here, I've seen these retailed as some sort of "cold" metal repairs. They've got metal in them but they just ain't metal... No brickbats, JB Weld enthusiasts, please.
What do you want to do with them? If you say what you're proposed project is, we might be able to come up with some ideas here.
Stan
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Look for amalgahms (spelling is wrong). These are metals disolved in mercury with a slow acting catalyst that absorbs the mercury, leaving the metal in solid form. The silver & gold "filings" used in dentistry are possibly the most known examples.
Hul
: Hello, I was just wondering of anyone could offer any information at all on : cold liquid bronze, brass, or copper. : Something that a catalyst could be added to and it could be poured with out : heat? Iam not even sure if this is possible so any info at all would be : great . : : Thanx : Rob : :
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That's in the same realm as cold fusion. You may have to wait a few years.
Rob Van wrote:

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