Cost of concreting an area

Ignoramus5649 wrote:


Either concrete or asphalt will work fine if the job is done right. The most import thing is the sub base and drainage. Without proper drainage the water will collect under the pavement and push it up. When it melts it will settle back and in the process you will get cracking of the surface which will lead to failure of the whole system.
You will first have to see what drainage problems you might have and what soil type it is. Some soils drain pretty well, others like clay will give you no end to drainage problems. I would imagine in Chicago you should go down about three feet and put in about a foot of oversize stone on the bottom with perforated pipe to drain the water if you have a place to drain it to. If you have decent soil drainage, you can get away without the perforated pipe. On top of the oversize you would put a layer of 2B stone (pa dot designation http://www.hkgroup.com/calculators/index.aspx?ProductCategoryID ( ) then pour your concrete on top of that. 8 inches should hold the weight you put on it if the base is done right. You could also pave the area. You would need at least 4 inches of coarse blacktop with a finish layer of 2 inches of finer material. You could add a fiber mesh in the blacktop that would tie it together better but I would not bother with that. Look at the commercial paving jobs around your area. Get a couple of estimates as to what the local professional contractors recommend.
Another way to finish it is to put in a layer of sand and put the high strength pavers in by hand. If they get moved by frost you can just reset them. You need the ones made from high strength concrete of at least 5000 psi material. http://castlerockpavers.com/gallery.php?action=submit&id ( http://stampedartistry.com/brick-pavers-houston.asp .
I have a big paving job coming up this spring on the whole parking area and delivery entrance. I am thinking of using the pavers since the water table here is almost at the surface. I have an artisean well in the basement and for most of this year my well was overflowing. Tomorrow they promised to put the new insulated rollup steel door in place, 14x16 ft. They were supposed to have it in last month. Right now I have two 8'x 20' x 1 inch steel plates on the ground for the forklifts and truck deliveries. I also have a 63,000 lb machine tarped outside that is coming in after I get the new door on the building. The old door which was 14 feet wide and not wide enough to get the vbm inside. I have two other vtls coming in at the end of this coming week. It's going to be one busy week moving machinery.
John
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On 2/25/2012 11:47 AM, Ignoramus1113 wrote:

I read somewhere that you can get the local concrete plant to dump excess concrete for free :)
MikeB
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wrote:

Yes, but that might be a problem for this project, mainly because you never know what you're going to get until it gets there - Pump Mix with pea gravel, Regular aggregate low strength, high strength, early high strength, air entrained or not, might even get a batch with colorant. Or how big a load. Or how long it's been mixing in the truck before the customer gave up and the truck started for your place.
This works better for simple ground cover slabs at equipment yards where appearance is secondary to just having a hard surface - and a few cracks are fine. You can keep a big patch of land cleared and ready to pour, and toss down the forms and some simple wire mesh panels to match the batch size. If the batch is already setting up in the truck you have to get it placed and worked FAST or it'll make a mound and freeze.
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On 2/25/2012 10:47 AM, Ignoramus1113 wrote:

Iggy, your $3000 +/- bid sounds on target and would be competitive here.
Make sure: 1. Make sure that the cut, remove, haul off demolition asphalt and dirt is included. You might offer to rift on site if you have any low spots. Make sure they include knocking it down and grading 2. Make sure there is sufficient compaction of subgrade - the true main ingredient for good concrete. 3. Make sure that they provide grade and drainage for new concrete.(seems you had some problems). Design for adding more concrete in the future. 4. Joint or cut so that no concrete dimension is more than 12'. Any contraction joints need to be 2" minimum. 5. Cure 6. Seal any construction or contraction joints 7. Keep traffic off for 7 days, more if possible 8. Seal once it is 30 days old
I would use 3500# air entrained.
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