Dalton Lathes

replying to Dennis Turk, Roger wrote: I have a Dalton Lathe 6 with a 3 jaw chuck marked "The D.E. Whiton Co." The
number 3 Jaw has three teeth missing. Where might i get a replacement jaw? ( Chuck is 4" dia. )
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, February 17, 2019 at 11:18:05 PM UTC-5, Roger wrote:

The

-lathes-308297-.htm
Hello,
From what I can tell, these parts are not generally interchangeable. I hav e a Dalton 7" (number 6125) and the three jaw chuck that isn't running true (after 100 years, no surprise...) and have been looking around for jaws or chuck to replace it. Nothing I've found fits - even the 1.25" - 12 spindle thread seems to be bespoke. Let me know if you find something!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, February 17, 2019 at 11:18:05 PM UTC-5, Roger wrote:

Hello,
From what I can tell, these parts are not generally interchangeable. I have a Dalton 7" (number 6125) and the three jaw chuck that isn't running true (after 100 years, no surprise...) and have been looking around for jaws or chuck to replace it. Nothing I've found fits - even the 1.25" - 12 spindle thread seems to be bespoke. Let me know if you find something!
============================ You buy a blank, unthreaded, chuck backplate and use the lathe to thread it to fit the spindle. Then you match the front of the backplate to the back of the new chuck. http://www.lathes.co.uk/latheparts/page7.html
You could practice threading a pipe fitting before risking the backplate.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 21 Feb 2019 17:59:54 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

Back when I was an apprentice boy no 3 jawed chuck was considered to be perfectly centered and one always chucked up a larger piece of stock to allow for a "truing cut" to ensure the work was running true. Things shore have changed but a 4 jawed, independent chuck and a dial indicator was the only method of ensuring that a work piece was "centered".
--
Cheers,
John B.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    [ ... ]

    Absolutely! Though you can get fairly close for many purposes with an "Adjust-Tru" style chuck.
    Best to Re-True it each time you change the size of stock held in the chuck.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | (KV4PH) Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
    [ ... ]

    Hmm ... first find out where the runout is coming from. One possible place in a 3-jaw (or the rare universal 4-jaw) is the scroll plate. It normally is held on center by a boss into the center of the plate, and over the years, the ID wears and allows the plate to shift off center -- thus carrying the jaws with it.
    To add to the fun -- if there are multiple key holes, the direction of the offset depends on the key hole used for the last tightening. Some chucks have a marker beside one of the (typically three) key holes, and when new, this was the one which would give minimum runout.
    So -- take the back plate off (assuming that there is a separate back plate) and whatever else is necessary to access the back of the scroll plate.
    Then clean it all with a reasonable grease solvent, and with the jaws removed, see whether the scroll plate can be slid around a bit. If so, slide it to one side, and at the point opposite the contact point, get your index gages and find which one is the thickest that you can slide into the gap.
    Divide that thickness by two, and get some shim stock of that thickness, and cut a piece long enough to wrap around the boss in the chuck, and wide enough to match the thickness of the scroll place, and put it in the gap between the boss and the scroll plate hub.
    Once this is done, try each of the key holes to see which gives the least runout. Hopefully, this is the one marked by the maker.
    Using this one, tighten the jaws onto a ring -- ideally one made to fit behind the gripping surface of the jaws -- and then mount a toolpost grinder (or adapt a Dremel or the like to act as one) and re-grind the inside end of the jaws until all three are clean fresh grinding. At this point, you will probably have better centering at all sizes with the reground jaws -- except if the scroll in the plate has worn at a particular angle of setting, or has had the scroll teeth bent by overtightening at a particular size. The wearing could be if it was at one time used in production, almost always tightened on the same diameter of stock. If that has happened, it really needs a new scroll plate -- somewhat tricky to make, unless you have a universal mill with an index head geared to the X-axis leadscrew.

    1.25" x 12TPI spindle suggests that you need to make your own backplate for a new chuck, rather than trying to find one which you can buy.
    Good Luck,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | (KV4PH) Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi, my father owns a Dalton Lathe that he has owned for around 50 years and is now trying to identify the model. We cannot see any identification pla tes on the lathe at all. Would you be able to identify it from pictures? I f you could send me an e-mail address, then I can We Transfer them to you.
Many thanks,
Nigel
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to turnern67, ggloor wrote: Hi Nigel, On Daltons the model number is usually stamped on the right hand end of the ways.
I would like to see any pictures you have: snipped-for-privacy@chesilton.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to turnern67, ggloor wrote: Hi Nigel, On Daltons the model number is usually stamped on the right hand end of the ways.
I would like to see any pictures you have: snipped-for-privacy@chesilton.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, December 26, 2003 at 8:31:31 AM UTC-8, Dennis Turk wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, December 26, 2003 at 8:31:31 AM UTC-8, Dennis Turk wrote:

Hi my name is Brian Denny, I bought a Dalton a while back, I believe it is a lot 4. It came to me without a tailstock and had been out side here in Oregon for a long time. I will eventually get to work on it. Anybody have a tailstock?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hello i have a Dalton nine x four and im looking for the end gear cover and top gear covers
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.