Detroit 6-71

Ignoramus5626 wrote:


The dampers are common on civilian stuff. Probably typical military BS in believing the contractor knows what they are talking about when they said "Oh those things aren't needed"........ OR they were afraid that they could get tripped and kill the engine (and the crew if it occurred at the wrong time)
There is one time they don't work. If the engine somehow gets started in reverse direction of normal rotation! One of our crew did that at a fire call. He had pulled the rig into a driveway, left it in reverse and jumped out. He forget to pop the brakes!!! Thing was nice and warmed up from the trip and it turned over about twice and fired up! Was dumping exhaust out the intake boxes and gulping air up the exhaust. The driver was freaking out. I walked over, told him to jump in, pop the brakes and stand on the brake pedal. Then just shoved a traffic cone in the exhaust. It died pretty quick between the gearbox and choking it.
I said normal rotation because the Detroits were built in clockwise and counter-clockwise rotation depending on application. Plus some were both and you shifted the racks to reverse the engine.
--
Steve W.

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This was a really funny story, though I am sure that it did not look funny in-person.
i
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Here's a picture of this generator.
http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/Detroit-Diesel-6-71.jpg
i
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On Tue, 15 Sep 2015 20:20:16 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

I don't know about river boats, but we had Detroit Diesel powered supply boats and one WW II landing craft on several jobs I worked on. As I remember, none of them had the damper shutdown valve. But nobody was shooting at us :-)
--
cheers,

John B.
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Well, John, actually, there's not a LOT of free-flying particulates in the bilges of your typical all-metal boat. There's just nothing down there that can generate such airborne waste.
In addition, except for the odd insect, there's not much in the way of particulates floating around over open water in non-industrialized countries, like 'Nam was.
I cannot remember ever seeing an engine damaged by airborne matter, except for airborne shrapnel and bullets.
Lloyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

Snow blower engines don't usually have air filters either. https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid 110301051205AAfJehh
-jsw
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On Thursday, September 17, 2015 at 9:17:27 AM UTC-4, Jim Wilkins wrote:

Our OMB & gig 6-71's air intake boxes were simple 'silencers', with just enough baffling to (try to) minimize air flow noise. They also served to keep idiots' inquisitive fingers out, I suppose.
Jim H.
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On 09/17/2015 08:18 AM, Jim Wilkins wrote:

The other factor to consider for those is that there _is_ a lot of blowing snow (Gee, I wonder where that came from.), and that can clog up an air filter real quick.
--
Bob Nichols AT comcast.net I am "RNichols42"

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On Tuesday, September 15, 2015 at 10:07:29 AM UTC-4, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

I stand corrected. Was a diesel truck mechanic many years ago, but never had any close experience with the Detroits. Turbos seemed to last forever on the Cummins engines, hence my question.
Garrett
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Garrett Fulton wrote:

Only time I saw a scavenger pump have issues with the bearings it ate the rotors and locked it up. Turbos on a screamin' Detroit get a LOT more heat than a 4 stroke.
The 2 stroke design is also why they sound like they are screaming even at low rpm. Twice as many power strokes per rev than a 4 so it sounds twice as fast.
--
Steve W.

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wrote:

And produces roughly twice the power ith the same displacement at the same speed.
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Ignoramus32337 wrote:

Oh, that probably makes in a 6-71NT, which is actually quieter than the original 6-71 with the straight-lobed rotors. Most of the turbocharged engines also have the helical-lobe rotors, which makes them (marginally) quieter.
They had one of the original gen sets at work for emergencies when the underground cables popped (they used to do that a LOT). They'd park it in the parking lot and run a festoon of 230 V cable to the basement of the building and wire it into the panel. You'd drive past it and think your car was going to EXPLODE from the vibration! That was a 6-71 (no N, no T) with essentially a spark arrestor on the exhaust, not really any sort of muffler. Everything on your car would be vibrating in tune with the Diesel's sonic output.
Jon
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Nice to know.

A muffler does help, with exhaust sound, but not with the rattle and such.
i
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On Sun, 13 Sep 2015 22:29:19 -0500, Ignoramus32337

There's also a massive wind/belt noise from the fan/radiator. It's the type of unit you want to dig a pit into the ground and build a sound deadening air exchange unit over to keep the gawdawful noise down. Even tiny generator noise is the pits. It' -so- pervasive, driving right through walls, insulation, and windows.
--
And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud
was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.
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Exactly
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On Mon, 14 Sep 2015 09:25:22 -0500, Ignoramus29663

In some installations, it's not bad. I've fished at Plummer's Lodge in the NWT, where they have a 2-71 running 24/7 to supply power to the camp (they have two of them; one runs, the other one is backup when the first is down for an oil change or whatever). I slept in a plywood shack right next to it (it was in a plywood shack, too) with no trouble. You could hardly hear it.
Or, maybe my hearing was going bad. <g>
--
Ed Huntress

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On Sun, 13 Sep 2015 22:29:19 -0500, Ignoramus32337

About half the noise of a "normally" mufflered 6-71 comes from the vibrations of the block. A guy in my home town used to have a '58 GMC dump truck with a 6-71 in it and a hi-hoe with either a 3-71 or 4-71 (can't remember, we are talking back in the late sixties) He had a honking big muffler mounted to the dump box - it was still loud on the road, but NOTHING like when he raised the box. He'd hi-tail it out of town with the hi-hoe dragging behing (front bucket over the tailgate of the dump truck) and you could hear him going up the hill clear across town. Then he started towing his little Chevy LUV behind the hoe for jobs where he didn't need the dump truck, and the hoe raised a real ruckus too. He used to dig wells with the hoe - you'd see a ring of dirt in the middle of a field, with black smoke pouring out of it, and an unholy racket you could hear for over a mile. Then all of a sudden you'd see the hoe pop out of the hole, hoe end first, riding on the front bucket. He levered the hoe out of the hole alternatel pulling with the hoe and curling the big bucket.
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On 9/13/2015 4:55 PM, Ignoramus32337 wrote:

"I gots t'know": what is Lot 52 "NOROPRESS; M# HSBL; KRAFT MAX 150 KV; HUB MAX 120MM; DRUCK MAX 150 BAR"
http://tinyurl.com/q8klogu
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I recognize the words at least. Kraft = strength, power or force (but voltage is Spannung), Hub = stroke, Druck = pressure, 1 Bar ~= 1 atmosphere.
Does the Master heat gun go with it?
Perhaps that combination wrings confessions from the souls of the dead?
-jsw
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What comparator?
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