Dremel tools

Anyone have any recommendations for a dremel tool or a non-Dremel brand dremel like tool? I have had really bad luck with dremel tools
as the variable speed control always dies within a few weeks of my having it. Maybe they just aren't made for metal working.
Non-Chinese preferred but that's most likely impossible. Last time I was at Sears I noticed that ALL Craftsman power tools were Chinese.
Thank You, Randy
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I have a Foredom, and love it.
Steve
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Second vote for the Foredom. Great tool. It will last for years of heavy use.         Todd
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wrote:

I have both Foredoms and Ryobis, as one very elderly HandiGrinder
For heavy work..the Foredom rules. for fast quick easy handling..the Ryobi I have has done good duty for at least 10 or more years.
Gunner
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wrote:

Is the Foredom air or electric?
Thank You, Randy
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(snip)

Electric. Their models run between 1/10th HP and 1/3rd HP. Motor is designed to hang from a hook with about a 6' flex shaft standard.
http://www.blackstoneind.com/foundations/store/home.asp
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wrote:

Foredom has a huge line of models. Research them before buying, because they have very different operating speeds and characteristics. Buy the one that is most suited to your work. The standard size chucks will hold just about any rotary device.
Steve
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wrote:

IIRC B&D brought out a flex shaft unit in the early '80's (1983 ?) that used the standard Dremel collets. I bought one and it is still down in the shop. I found the flex shaft awkward to handle and the hand piece was close in size to the dremel moto tool. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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I 've used a Ryobi for a few years and it seems to be a quality product, although a little more bulky than a Dremel. A little more powerful as well, though. Picked it up from one of the traveling tool shows; Homier (sp) I think.
dennis in nca
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Foredom
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I much prefer my Proxxon to the Dremel. The Dremel requires an assortment of collets, and it seems like the one in place is always wrong. Proxxon has an adjustable chuck which allows me to go from the finest drill bit to a reasonably large diameter quite easily. My first one was replaced under warranty due to a fauy speed control, but I have had no other problems.
On my Dremel, the flex shaft broke, and I was able to pull out one of the pieces very easily, but it was impossible to get the other piece out. If your Dremel flex shaft starts to sound "different" pull the core out for replacement before it breaks.
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Keywords:

I actually really like my Dremel, but it's a fixed speed and I use a foot pedal with it. Beats the pants off the variable speed on the tool approach. They used to sell a good ball bearing fixed speed unit, but for a while they only had bronze bearing cheapo single speeds. I don't know if these are available anymore or not.
If mine dies (it's about 20 years old now), I've been thinking about getting the ball bearing variable speed model & bypassing the speed control. You can't use the variable speed models with the foot pedal control, the two end up arguing. I've been following the thread on bypassing the internal speed control to see how easy that might be, but the thread rapidly veered off topic.
A Foredom is good for a lot of stuff, but I have a drill press & a router base for my Dremel that work very nicely & that I don't want to part with.
Doug White
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I have had really bad luck with dremel tools

...odd, I have been using my dremel for metal work for 20 years and never had problems with the speed control. I have broken the little plastic connecter between the moter and the bit section twice now. At one time Dremel and Craftsman were the same thing. Is that different now?
LLB
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I screwed up and broke the plastic connector on my Dremel variable speed tool just last week. Where can I find this part? Or do I just have to junk it and buy a new one? I'm not in the shop right now to see what Model # mine is but I have had it for 15 years and it has the variable speed. I messed mine up when I was trying to get a better grip on the tool and I accidentally pushed the connector locking button forward and it stripped the plastic connector.
Thanks in advance for any suggestions,
Dennis
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LLBrown wrote:

I don't know about the new ones , but my Craftsman is a rebranded Dremel . It's at least 15 years old , and been used for everything from a Pinewood Derby carver to a toolpost grinder . Last use was to do the finish grind on a larger diameter live center for my lathe ...
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On Sat, 13 Oct 2007 06:58:18 -0500, Snag wrote:

I use a Foredom, but also have a few Dremels and a Proxxon. The single speed Dremel plugged into a solid state speed controller is good, but rather noisy. The Proxxon has more torque and is very quiet, nearly vibration-free and sturdy.
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Randy wrote:

Proxxon (www.proxxon.com) isn't that bad and has a wider selection. Those who had the opportunity (or the bad luck) to compare, preferred the Proxxon.
Nick
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