Drill 1/16th inch hole through 8mm stainless steel rod?

wrote:


There is that too. Shrug
If you listen/feel carefuly..you will notice a change in sound/vibration just before breakthrough...99.9% of the time.
Tune yourself for that "change" and at that point...back off a smidge
Ive hand drilled so many holes over the years with a drill motor..that its become automatic for me. Tune your brain for it..and you will very seldom ever break a bit. That and keeping the drill/motor in line.
<G> It even works in wood.
Gunner
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/29/2013 5:04 PM, Gunner Asch wrote:

Oh, I know what you mean, Gunner. And with larger bits I can do just that.
But a 1/16" diameter bit through stainless tube? No, it just happens to quick. I guess it's because the flutes are so tiny?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Actually...you just havent developed "the touch" well enough.
Seriously.
Gunner
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You didn't "lighten up" :-)
As the drill point breaks through the bottom of the work the area of the drill point that is opposed by metal decreases, thus the pressure (in PSI) increases unless you reduce pressure on the drill press handle...
--
Cheers,

John B.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/29/2013 8:17 PM, John B. wrote:

Granted - most of the time - John. But with 1/16" diameter bits, well . . .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It is all relative Richard. Little drill - you don't push very hard. Big drills you do.
When I was Edwards AFB the guys in the Experimental Shop made some 1/1000th inch drill bits and drilled holes in some thin brass shim stock..... now that took some finesse :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Didn't he say "stainless", Gunner?
Lloyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That sounds like an opportunity to acquire some more tools! <G>
LLoyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 08:14:45 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

Indeed!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hey, Gunner :)
My metallurgy teacher said all that too and added that it was funny to tell a new guy running a bandsaw to "take it easy on that stainless steel you're fixin' to cut".
Questions: Do you really need to clear chips on a ~5/16" deep hole? Or is it just because of the 1/16" drill bit? Or is it just habit that you mentioned that? ;)
Alvin in AZ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

My practice is to keep drilling while the chips flow out freely, but stop frequently to brush them off the bit if they don't, because they can jam and break the bit.
I don't extract the bit completely so that small chips won't fall in and land under the cutting edge.
If the chips come out in continuous strings I relax most of the feed pressure briefly when they reach a couple of inches long, to break them so they don't wind into a spinning, sharp-edged blob. I used to raise the bit but found that unnecessary unless the chips aren't feeding up the spiral. jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/29/2013 12:44 PM, Jim Wilkins wrote:

Yeah. One of my old quotes, "aluminum will cut you, but steel will make you bleed"...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Never heard that before.
I'm old, I take 81mg Aspirin, I get cut or scratched, I bleed. xD
-----------------------
Was "hand" drilling vehicle leaf springs with a ~7/16" drill bit and making up to three foot coils of -spring- steel, it was cool! :)
I deeply countersunk the holes, hammered down a steel rod peening it out until the hole and countersinks were completely filled.
Made the leaf spring clamps from 3" square tubing... :)
http://www.panix.com/~alvinj/file12/clamp.jpg
Double nutted the 3/8" bolt and that's 3/8" fuel hose. Wow, that was >11 years ago and they still look like new. :)
Alvin in AZ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/29/2013 1:35 PM, snipped-for-privacy@Example.com wrote:

That's because I just told it to you, Alvin.
You know it's true, though. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Didn't see that until now. LOL :)
Butthead in AZ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/29/2013 10:31 PM, snipped-for-privacy@Example.com wrote:

Pass it on, if you wish... :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 16:54:36 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@Example.com wrote:

As a rule...stainless steel chips tend to be a bit "gummy" and tend to block the clearance of the bit. Given the small diameter of the flutes...it may or may not pack the flutes. So a quick up and back tends to get rid of them. Keep in mind..that you are going nearly 5 diameters (of the bit) deep... and there is some additional cooling of the bit, however quick...when you "peck" drill.
I work in commercial machine shops..keeping machines alive and running..and "pecking" is something that is almost always programmed into the CNC program when the holes are more than 2-3 diameters deep...particularly when working with "gummy" materials.
Do as you see fit..but its a strong suggestion. That bit is afterall..only 1/16 of an inch in diameter.
Another poster also mentioned short drill bits. Yes indeed! The shorter the better. Keep in mind..that any drill can be considered a very fragile "spring"..so keep em short..keeps them stiffer and less likely to snap.
What you really need are "screw machine" drill bits. They are half the length (more or less) of standard "jobber" drill bits and as a result..are stiffer and less likely to snap. Just remember...some screw machine bits are left handed..so if you get some..examine them closely and if using a hand drill..simply run em backwards.
Gunner
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cool, thanks for that. :)
Alvin in AZ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/29/2013 10:14 PM, snipped-for-privacy@Example.com wrote:

Another thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not only 'realistic', but easy-peasy. Lloyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.