Fork lift info

Someone here was a certified forklift repair tech. I've lost the history.
I bought an old (1978) ClarkLift 2000lb machine to help moving projects
around the shop. Got it for 3K delivered, and it runs well and is dry everywhere (!).
It has only one problem that someone else hasn't already bypassed, removed, or re-engineered -- The dip tube in the fuel tank must (probably) has a hole in it. It loses its prime after sitting for as little as 10 minutes. The tube outlet block/fitting appears to be welded to the tank, so no removing the tube to replace or repair it -- without some fancy torch work INSIDE the body of the machine (before you say it... NO! I won't <G>)
It has an electric pump installed to replace the engine-driven one, and the electric apparently can self-prime, but not fast enough to suit the "start-and-go" mentality. So right now, I'm throwing an ounce of fuel into the air cleaner intake to get it started. No biggy, but I don't want to start removing stuff until next week, after I get some big pieces moved.
SO... Is this tank welded in? Can it be removed, cleaned, replaced? If not, I think the strategy would be to build a box inside the bustle, and install a new (maybe smaller) tank, with the top of the draw tube about level with the carb.
Thanks, Lloyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

Is there a handy place to plumb in an outboard motor primer bulb?
jsw
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Hey! That's an idea! I had thought about a small plunger pump (say, up on the dash), but the bulbs are cheap, and easy to replace.
NeeeexxxxT! <G>
Lloyd
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On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 17:06:22 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:>Someone here was a certified forklift repair tech. I've lost the

Drill a new hole in the tank and make a new "tube outlet block fitting" that bolts to the tank with a new dip tube in it.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca fired this volley in

Another idea... If I can get a drill to where it needs to be, that would work.
Lloyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

Can you slide a piece of hobby-store telescoping brass tubing into the original tube and solder it?
I recently modified two garden sprayers to replace the hose, valve and nozzle with a kitchen sink spray hose by sliding in a larger outlet tube with a compression -to- NPT fitting on the end. The original hose and outlet fitting restrict flow too much with the spray hose simply spliced on.
The smaller is now a back yard emergency fire extinguisher and hand/eye washer, the larger is for taking showers with water heated in a kettle on the wood stove when the power is out (otherwise another fire extinguisher). The sink spray heads mark them as not for use with chemicals.
One of the sprayers used a separate hollow bolt and nut for the pressure-tight outlet fitting. The bolt had a tab extending radially from the head to keep it from rotating. Perhaps you could weld an extension handle to a hollowed bolt that's long enough to position it in your new drilled hole from the filler opening.
The original cap nut outside compresses the rubber washer under it enough to seal the new outlet tube.
jsw
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Maybe not hard tubing, because it's an elbow at the tank -- goes in the side at the very top, then down. But I _might_ be able to do the sewer pipe trick, and line it with some flexible tubing. Lloyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

Is it straight far enough to cut it and install a flare or compression fitting, as I did on the garden sprayer?
jsw
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Don't know, all of it but the hose fitting is inside the tank. It is a welded-in-place tank.
Lloyd
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On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 17:06:22 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:>Someone here was a certified forklift repair tech. I've lost the

Carburetors seldom "lose their prime", Lloyd. When they do, it's usually a cracked float bowl, with fuel spilling all over the engine. You'd probably notice that, especially after the fire. <g>

The ounce of fuel into the carb every time will wash the oil off the cylinder walls and you'll need to rebuild much sooner. I recommend stopping that practice today.

Yeah, you could do that, but first look at the carb and/or how you're starting it. Does it have an automatic or manual choke? Does it have a foot throttle or lever? Perhaps it needs a quick pump (or two?) prior to starting. Are you doing that now?
The Clark tech will know more. I'm just a retired auto mech.
-- That's the thing about needs. Sometimes, when you get them met, you don't need them anymore. -- Michael Patrick King
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I didn't say the carb "lost it's prime"; I said the vertical suction tube in the tank (which goes to the bottom, and comes out the top) "loses its prime".

I'm not doing that. You didn't read my post, did you?
I already know all of what you warned of and suggested and more. I have already trouble-shot the problem to this stage. There is no accelerator pump on this carb (never was), and it has a working manual choke.
Thanks.
LLoyd
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On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 20:59:43 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

That usually leads to carb float bowl emptiness. Pardon my assumption. But both mechanical and electric fuel pumps generally keep the float bowl full, and there would be gas in the carb when you went to start it ten minutes or more later. Your complaint has holes in it.

OK, so you said the air cleaner intake and I responded to the more usual "dump it in the carb" move. My mistake.

Fine. Good luck with your forklift tech after your response here.

Yeahright.
-- That's the thing about needs. Sometimes, when you get them met, you don't need them anymore. -- Michael Patrick King
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No my initial description had holes in it. It lights if it was running OK when left alone. But just like my old Dayton genset, that updraft carb takes a BIG swallow of gas on cranking, and what's in the bowl doesn't last long enough to get the 'sputters' out.
I find if I wet-prime the filter before I crank it the first time, it runs long enough to re-establish prime -- maybe a minute and a half. If I don't, it dies in about 30 seconds, and must be primed anyway.
I admit that sounds like a low float settings, because I'd think what was in the bowl should last longer than that.
Larry, like with a lot of cars, everything is up hill from the tank.
The last time the forklift guy was here on rcm, he disputed something I said, and I agreed with him, and bowed to his expertice. But he wasn't high-handed about his knowlege, and didn't assume I was stupid. He just described the actual Hyster lift characteristics I mistook.
You _started_ by stating that what I've actually seen with my empty, gasoline-free hose coming out of the tank is impossible, then went down- hill from there.
How would you feel if someone told you, "Dummy, you have to put a standard transmission in gear before the car will go up a hill", when you told them it had a broken ring gear in the pumpkin?
Lloyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" wrote:

I don't know what that is supposed to mean, but I agree with Larry. From the sketchy info you have supplied it is very unlikely that the problem is the tube in the tank.
For one thing, you said it has an electric pump. That pump should work whenever it has power. It shouldn't need the engine to run for 1.5 minutes for it to start working. If it can ever pump and and fill the carb, it should be able to do that before you even attempt to crank the engine.
-jim

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It's also above the tank, and takes about that long to re-prime, once it has sucked air.
Lloyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" wrote:

Does the engine start fine if you run the pump for 1.5 minutes before attempting to crank the engine?
-jim

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Yes
I tried it this morning at 42 degrees, and it required choking, but started.
LLoyd
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On Tue, 24 Apr 2012 06:04:46 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

You might check your gas cap. Plugged caps can cause similar traits.

Well, I didn't mean to come across that way, and stated that the Clark guy probably had more info than a mechanic. <shrug>

No, I actually just shifted from the pickup tube to the carb.

-- Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, Or who said it, Even if I have said it, Unless it agrees with your own reason And your own common sense. -- Buddha
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