Forklift leaking brake fluid from right brake drum

I took off the wheel and the drum. It looks like the brake shoe cylinder is leaking. I hope that I can find a replacement.
i

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is this it?
http://www.machinerytrader.com/listingsdetail/detail.aspx?OHIDh19249 &
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No, it is not.
i
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On Nov 1, 9:03 pm, Ignoramus18836 <ignoramus18...@NOSPAM. 18836.invalid> wrote:>

Iggy
A while back you had a video of a something like a 2" impact wrench. That will snatch that nut right off.
CarlBoyd
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On Wed, 2 Nov 2011 09:45:03 -0700 (PDT), Carl

He sold it not long after he bought it. And it would have been a bit of overkill for this, plus he would need enough air to get it moving.
For this, something in the 3/4" to 1" impact would be plenty.
The fun part is picking it up to work on it - you need a special low-profile high-load floor jack to pick it up, so start looking.
Sometimes there's a place for a 'stubby' bottle jack or a "Toe Jack" they use to get charter bus Tag Axles off the ground - but be careful, if you drop that fork truck on your toe...
You are also supposed to have special low-boy jackstands for fork trucks, but that's easily substituted with good cribbing lumber and a chunk of 1/2" steel plate on top to spread the load steel to steel.
One Good Thing: This one looks like it has enough ground clearance to go outside and deal with a little snow without getting instantly stucked. Once it has working brakes, that is...
--<< Bruce >>--
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On 2011-11-03, Bruce L. Bergman (munged human readable)

I took the nuts off, using an electric 3/4" impact wrench.

Not at all.

I lifted the forklift using a Simplex jack, and it is now resting on 4x4s.

Yes, it is attractive for a few purposes like that, indeed.
i
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I wanted to do it the fight way, to have the forklift sitting up in th air, without relying on any hydraulics.

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Lifting the forklift was the easiest part of the job so far. I used a Simplex 10 ton mechanical jack. Right now the front of the forklift sits on 4x4s.
I also took the wheel off with a 3/4" electric impact wrench.
I bought a Timken bearing for the wheel, however, not the brake cylinder yet. Forklift dealers seem to be intent on wasting a lot of my time. I should have bought one online.
i
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On Sat, 05 Nov 2011 08:14:50 -0500, Ignoramus27678

Generally, when a dealer/mfgr wastes your time, it is for one of two things. One is that they simply don't care a rat's ass whether or not it is an inconvenience to you. Second is to figure out a way to make a really hefty profit from you. A distant third is that the person you talked with is extremely incompetent, though this possibility may crop up during your stint with #1 or #2, too.
(Cynics Unite!)
-- The unexamined life is not worth living. --Socrates
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On Sat, 05 Nov 2011 08:14:50 -0500, Ignoramus27678

Okay, Gunner, Test Grading time - Fail, or Partial Credit?
I vote for Partial Credit, because he WILL need that Simplex for working on the rear tires and suspension - no mast on that end.
But if the truck runs, the 'tilt mast back, add cribbing under mast, tilt mast forward, safety cribbing under chassis' is a lot easier.
(And for 's sake, don't anybody show Iggy that "Self Loading Excavator into the back of a Dump Truck" footage for a few years. He might get ideas he shouldn't have yet. That's an advanced level trick for someone with a few hundred operating hours under their belt. People like Adam Savage - and he freaked when he first tried it...)

Sometimes there's a valid reason for the 50 Questions - especially on industrial gear where they've made the same item for 30 or 40 years straight. They make production changes, so you need to know the serial number and/or the manufacture date. And if you can get the casting numbers off the bad parts, that helps too.
Some trucks use the same axle and backing plates for several different weight ranges - there's one part for 13X2-1/2" brake shoes for the single-wheel, and a different size wheel cylinder for the 13X5" shoes on a Dually tired truck. And it's easy to swap the parts around in the field, so they need to know what you've got.
--<< Bruce >>--
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On 2011-11-05, Bruce L. Bergman (munged human readable)

I lost you here. I have this simplex jack on the shelf, why can't I use it for the back?

I am too much of a chicken to attempt that.

There was a part number on the bendix cylinder. I think that I found some parts that interchange.
i
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On 11/5/2011 1:07 PM, Ignoramus27678 wrote: ...

Be _very_ careful there about what you substitute...more often (or at least as often) than not those will be OEM-specific stuff not sold other than thru the OEM supply chain. The disadvantage of Green and/or Yellow or other NamedPaintSchemes, but there's the fact they are what they are and parts are available for 20-, 30=, maybe even 50 years (and the gear is still functional after that long).
--
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I do not understand what you are saying, sorry.
i
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You gotta be kidding me.
The whole forklift weighs less than 10k lbs
i drinking

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On Sat, 05 Nov 2011 19:02:11 -0500, Ignoramus27678

If it weighs 10K you will have over 8 on the back tires. The whole idea is to counter weight the forks.
Karl
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On Sat, 05 Nov 2011 13:07:16 -0500, Ignoramus27678

The pneumatic tire outdoor duty forklifts actually have ground clearance. A Simplex railroad jack, stubby bottle jack, or other devices can be used to get them off the ground for repairs.
Nothing "wrong" with using a jack for that, but the Mast Tilt trick means you don't need any of that.
The solid tire Indoor Only fork trucks do Not have clearance for a regular jack, if you're lucky you have three to four inches from the floor - and that's with new tires and full tread. I've seen under two inches lots of times. A regular trolley jack won't fit under there, and two tons isn't nearly enough.
Takes a special floor jack with a very short nose to do the pick on these safely, and you have to be Real Sure the truck is blocked up and stable before you start taking wheels off and sticking your body parts in bad places.

Wait till you have a year or so experience on it with a lot of hours. As you're buzzing one around like it's second nature, and running the valves and digging holes like you are playing a Video Game - without even thinking about which valve does what and whether you just push or pull (or twist and tilt and trigger on a Joystick style digger) just a flick of the wrist and you're digging.
THEN you can do the self-unload trick. And it'll be fun.
--<< Bruce >>--
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On 2011-11-06, Bruce L. Bergman (munged human readable)

Simplex is a mechanical toe jack, they are awesome for moving machinery. All riggers have them.
I have two, a 5 ton one and a 10 ton one (plus a giant 20 ton Buda that I never use).
http://www.ebay.com/itm/270822920928
i
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On Sat, 05 Nov 2011 10:04:03 -0700, "Bruce L. Bergman (munged human

I do it all the time to load my excavator on the trailer. The ramps are too heavy for me to carry comfortably at about 50 kg each. The ramps are long as #2 son uses it to carry cars he soups up for customers and they have very little ground clearance.
OK, it is only a Yanmar B17, 1.3 tonnes and the car trailer ( flatbed ) is only about 600 mm above ground level.
Drive forward and place bucket on bed, lift front end with bucket arm and drive forward until tread is on rear of trailer, lower dozer blade so it cannot accidentally slide off, spin body so bucket is at rear, raise body with bucket, drive on to trailer while operating the bucket and blade to help push it on.
I do choose the loading place to get the rear of the trailer as low as possible, so the Patrol is always higher than the trailer.
    Alan
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On Sun, 06 Nov 2011 22:54:07 +0800, snipped-for-privacy@iinet.net.oz wrote:

Yes, but that's onto the back of a car trailer without ramps, not into the back of a full-size dump truck without ramps. Same process, but the "Angle of the Dangle" is a little more serious, you're at about 45 degrees as you spin it around.
Be sure to pull in the boom as you go around for the push-off, you don't want to fall over sideways right about then.
And be real careful about selecting the tracks Forward or Reverse if you've got the cab spun around to the other end. I'd almost have a bystander throw chocks behind the tracks if I was doing it for the first time, so I don't mess up too spectacularly...
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