Fox Poll-67% Say Ban Assault Rifles

On Friday, August 16, 2019 at 5:19:12 PM UTC-4, RichA wrote:


90% want NRA background checks. Explain that.
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On Fri, 16 Aug 2019 14:44:23 -0700 (PDT), walter snipped-for-privacy@post.com wrote:

But 80% or 90% of what? I know that the article quoted uses the wording that "Ninety percent of registered voters" but is that true?
According to one site I visited that would have been 200 million voters, as of 0/19/2016. Another site tells me that there were 153.07 million as of 2018.
It seems apparent that no one really is sure how many "registered voters" there are, at least until the next election, and 90% of "we're not really sure" is how many?
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On Friday, August 16, 2019 at 6:04:11 PM UTC-4, John B. wrote:

To the nearest thousand, there were 153,066,000 registered voters at the time of the 2018 elections, out of an adult citizen, US population of 228,832,000 -- 67%. Margin of error, 0.3 at 90% confidence interval.
These figures are known to very high accuracy. You just have to know where to find them. The Census Bureau compiles the official registration counts from each state.
As for what the public knows about "assault rifles," they mean the military-style semiautomatic rifles that have become widely popular for killing masses of people. Those also are the ones that are the subject of proposed bans and buy-backs.
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On Fri, 16 Aug 2019 19:41:04 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Your missing the boat. I've found several sites claiming different numbers for the number of voters and the reference to the gun survey says ninety percent of the voters? Now is 90 percent, ninety percent of the sites that I came across? Is it 90% of the legal number of registered voters as of 2018? Noting that a few blokes might have registered in the last few months. Or is it 90 percent of a number of carefully selected individuals that they refereed to as registered voters?
Incidentally, I had a good friend that owned a company that did surveys, ranging from "should fridges be sold "up country" on the never, never?", to Will building a copper refinery, on the S.W. coast be a good investment?"
One of his claims was that he could design any survey to "prove" anything that you wanted, and given that his business seemed very successful I'd guess that he was probably correct.

And just think. From the 1940's an "assault rifle" has been defined as "An assault rifle is a selective-fire rifle that uses an intermediate cartridge and a detachable magazine."
I believe that the term was first used by the Germans, "Sturmgewehr", in about 1944.
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The Statistics class I took in college covered polling bias errors in some detail. One example was that busy people at work were difficult to reach, leaving the unemployed at home to fill the sample size quota. Guess how they tend to vote.
I went in early to dodge rush hour and took night engineering classes to keep up with my very challenging aerospace job, so I couldn't be contacted between 6AM and 9 - 10PM for the intense NH Primary polling.
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On Aug 18, 2019, Jim Wilkins wrote

polling bias from that class?
Joe Gwinn
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about polling bias from that class?
Joe Gwinn
================= I don't, but then my Internet search capability is limited by low bandwidth (currently 44k dial-up) and 3G/4G data caps, the disadvantage of not having cable TV. I find what I already know the keywords to look for.
IIRC the faulty polling he described took place in pre-Internet New York where receptionists filtered calls to employees. The remedy was supposed to be to try harder to reach everyone on the original random list, a recipe to miss the deadline and alienate them instead.
There were two Statistics classes with identical course descriptions, one in the College of Engineering and the other in Liberal Arts. The Engineering one conflicted with a course I badly needed so I took a chance on the Liberal Arts one, which turned out to be more sociology than math. Its light-weight homework was welcome since I was also struggling through Quantum Mechanics.
I didn't suffer the lack until much later, when Dr Sklar of Qualcomm asked his digital communications theory class at Mitre to calculate the entropy of an array of possible data bit values.
http://www.stat.columbia.edu/~gelman/research/unpublished/polling-errors.pdf I learned to find and eliminate the systematic errors until I could perform and document one accurate measurement that would withstand cross-examination in court. That's difficult enough in the physical sciences and maybe impossible for opinion polls since the disgruntled misfits have tried to demonize traditional societal values they can't meet and substitute mutable opportunistic ones that benefit themselves and punish their critics. That discourages rational discussion while hardening opposition in the voting booth. Pollsters can't understand why we NH voters are "undecided" until the curtain closes behind us.
Did you notice how fast the clamor for ethnic "Diversity" evaporated after more-ethnically-diverse Bruno Mars swept the Grammys?
Dissent is "vital to democracy", unless it's dissent against climate change. Then it's dangerous heresy that the authorities must suppress.
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On Aug 19, 2019, Jim Wilkins wrote


.
Yep. What year was this? Sounds like 1970, although we did have direct dial desk phones then.
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I think that in practice, the examples of selection bias may have been more valuable than added math.
The difference is that with imperfect math one may lose a bit of accuracy, while with selection bias, the whole study can become invalid and thus worthless.
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Got it. Thanks.
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misfits. The world is far more complex than that.
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I had not noticed, but I never heard of Bruno Mars either. He does seem to have a dangerous combination of diversity checkboxes coupled with raw talent.
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Yes. And they should be careful what they pray for. The shoe will soon be on the other foot.
Joe Gwinn
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On Aug 19, 2019, Jim Wilkins wrote ...

Yes. And they should be careful what they pray for. The shoe will soon be on the other foot.
Joe Gwinn
========== They don't practice what they preach. I never see laundry drying on clotheslines, or reuseable bags in anyone else's grocery cart. The clerks tell me I'm the only one who regularly uses them.
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On Monday, August 19, 2019 at 2:19:55 PM UTC-4, Jim Wilkins wrote:

I stopped getting calls from pollsters, because they didn't like my answers. They apparently keep lists to tailor their results, like other fake media does.
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