Freezing locks

Or the ever-popular lox with LOX?
Jim
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Reply to
jim rozen
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Let's see: Freeze the lox with LOX, put the lox on a bagel that you dip in LOX, spray both with cooking oil spray immediately after dipping the bagel. Instant toasted bagel with lox by the LOX process.
Safety Tips: Use long tongs or build your own precision Waldoes. (Metalworking content) Wear eye protection. Close the LOX dewar _before_ spraying the bagel.
Isn't this what meshuginah means?
Reply to
John Husvar
On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 15:35:07 GMT, "Rick" calmly ranted:
It's also possible to open nearly any padlock with a dozen or fewer whacks of a hammer if one doesn't have picks handy.
Of course he has. _You_ pointed him to it, twitley.
Crikey, I hope not. Where do these fools COME from? He'll want to outlaw welders (electric and gas), how-to books, tech courses in school, and OTJ training next. Talk about a paranoid sumbitch. He'd have fit into Nazi Germany really well...as an informer, no doubt.
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Reply to
Larry Jaques
I find it fascenating that they don't run out of bullets in a gunfight. Unless, of course, it's part of the suspense.
And dontcha just love it when the hero and heroine go into a spooky house or an old dilapidated warehouse, he in a suit and she in high-heeled shoes, hear all sorts of ominous noises, see mysterious movements in the shadows, and what's the first thing they do? One of 'em says, "Let's split up..."
But somewhere near the top of the "Yeah, right!" list has to be the Bruce Willis _Die_Hard_ flicks. Nobody can take that much abuse, get shot that many times, apparently feel absolutely no pain, and still be able to do olympic-level acrobatics and black-belt grade martial arts fighting. By the time he finally gets the bad guy, Willis' character should have been dead about 45 minutes ago.
Regards,
Scotty
Reply to
Scotty
You just reminded me that circa 1960 I watched with disbelief as the then fiftyish Dr. D.H. Tomboulian, of the Department of Physics at Cornell University, tossed a small paper cup full of LN down his throat like it was Jack Daniel's, with no apparent pain or ill effects.
He did belch up a storm for the next few minutes though. He told us the moisture in his alimentary canal had something to do with keeping the tissues from being damaged during the time it took for the LN to boil off.
I never had the nerve to do it myself.
Anybody here seen, or maybe even tried, that stunt?
Jeff
Reply to
Jeff Wisnia
He probably doesn't swallow.
Look here:
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I wouldn't try that!
BTW, if any one in Seattle wants to try an experiment w/ LN, let me know--I have access to it. We could see if a lock will actually shatter. Personally, I doubt one could break say a bicycle U-lock like this. Mythbusters any one?
One day I was fooling around in lab. I made a finger out of aluminum foil and poured some LN into it. LOX condensed out of the air and dribbled down the outside of the finger. I collected some in a tube and dropped a match in... POOF!
Jeff Dantzler
Reply to
Jeff Dantzler
I've heard tell that a pair of line-up pins, or spud wrenches, will do nicely too. Simply pass the two through the shackle, and then cross them out into an X.
Jim
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Reply to
jim rozen
High School Chemistry, 1963: Teacher one day stopped his lecture on chemical equations and remarked: "You brats will never learn. I can't take this anymore. It's hopeless."
Whereupon he took a bottle of sodium hydroxide crystals, carefully weighed out a batch and tossed it into a beaker it. He then took a bottle of hydrochloric acid, measured it and drained it into the beaker, waited a few minutes while mixing the brew, added some water, and then said: "No more. I'm done with it. This is the end."
He drank it.
It wasn't hard for him to figure out who had done the previous day's homework.
They were the ones who were running for the principal's office or (in the case of one) fainting. The rest of us were LOAO.
A teacher who did that now would probably be drummed out of the NEA.
Reply to
John Husvar
Yes, but if you fill the lock with water, and are able to freeze that, you may destroy the lock in doing so. Water expands as it freezes, and nothing, but nothing, will stop it. If it doesn't break the lock first time, run some more water in and do it again.
Al Moore
Reply to
Alan Moore
Urk!
After reading that I tend to believe your "doesn't swallow" theory.
Probably the belching was just a "special effect" added to make us believe he swallowed the LN.
But my memory reminds me that he sure left us with the impression that the LN went "down the hatch".
Tomboulian was a consultant on the project we were working on (A rocket lofted diffraction grating spectrometer IIRC.) and a mentor to several of us. Thinking about it now, if his swallowing was just simulated, then he was taking quite a risk that one of us young guys would try it on our own with results comparable to those of that poor sod in the link you provided above. We had no reason to think chicanery was involved.
I didn't!
Jeff
Reply to
Jeff Wisnia
Hell no he wouldn't... He wouldn't last that long before the parents of the "traumatized" students lynched him. Over a little saltwater... :)
Reply to
Don Bruder
Yes, when he was defrosted and when he was sneak-attacked in a public stall. And there was a guy talking to him..
And probably another. No one said it didn't have to be low-brow. :_)
Tim
-- "I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!" - Homer Simpson Website @
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Reply to
Tim Williams
It does depend on the steel. But freon will get ordinary steel cold enough that it will shatter. My son witnessed this on the streets of NYC and told me about it. I did not believe that freon would get steel cold enough, so looked in the set of reference books at work and found that steel gets brittle at temperatures not much below freezing. I forget the actual temperature.
Of course I never believed the stories of loggers warming up their axes before using them on cold days either. But apparently they are true.
Dan
Reply to
Dan Caster
And why might you come to this formum with this question, pray tell? Woluld you aspire to be stealing bycycles perchance?
The original Krypton bike locks had shackles that were overhardened and were thus vulnerable to being shattered by impact after being supercooled by freon or dry ice. They've fixed that so that approach doesn't work anymore. That's not to say they're invulnerable because they certainly are not, but you won't get it done with freon or dry ice.
Reply to
Don Foreman
Its liquid nitrogen, not freon. Freon cannot get a low enough temperature.
The stuff seems to be readily avialable by web. I can only hope that the most likely users of it on a lock (theives) seriously injure themselves using it.
Reply to
Scott Moore

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