Gingery furnace has been fired

Anyone interested in my progress on the Gingery lathe project can find
pictures here:
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(Standards non-compliant browsers may have difficulty.)
Reply to
PhysicsGenius
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*Which* standards? The ones for the original browsers like Mosaic? The early Netscape ones? some version of IE -- from the company which claims to "embrace and extend" standards, thus making sure that nothing else quite does what their stuff does? (Shudder!)
Netscape 4.77 fails.
Mozilla 1.5a has no problems.
Both on Sun's Solaris, FWIW.
So -- I guess that you mean *new* standards, not the original *real* standards. :-) So your selections are designed to break older browsers, and thus limit your audience.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
MSIE6 with all the patches on a win2k machine barfed on it. Hehehe! Had to VNC into one of the machines in the garage to use Mozilla :-)
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
I mean XHTML, which is the official "upgrade path" from HTML 4 and has been a standard for something like 6 years now.
Reply to
PhysicsGenius
Yeah, I was looking into that last night. Apparently IE, even the very newest versions, doesn't support XHTML (qua XHTML) at all. Incredible.
Reply to
PhysicsGenius
Sorry, 4 years.
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Reply to
PhysicsGenius
From this page
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excised the paragraph below using IE6
"XHTML 1.0 is specified in three "flavors". You specify which of these variants you are using by inserting a line at the beginning of the document. For example, the HTML for this document starts with a line which says that it is using XHTML 1.0 Strict. "
So what's wrong with your page? Are you using XHTML 2.0 which is not backward compatible?
Some folks just gotta be on the bleeding edge...
Reply to
John Ings
Some of my other pages (not Gingery related) use MathML, which I believe requires XHTML 1.1. It doesn't matter though, AFAICT, because IE doesn't support XHTML *at all*, even transitional. So I'd still be reduced to the "tag soup" world of legacy HTML, despite calling it "XHTML".
But it's also a principle thing. XHTML is the Right Way and I'm not going to help Microsoft screw us over by compromising that. There's no technical reason they can't have XHTML in IE--it's just a control issue.
Reply to
PhysicsGenius
What a shame. I would have liked to have seen your page.
Reply to
Ron Thompson
I agree. I'm researching now if there's a standards-compliant way I can reformat that will keep the features I want but still let broken browsers stumble through it.
R> What a shame. I would have liked to have seen your page.
Reply to
PhysicsGenius
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Huh? Wasshappenin' ?
Suddenly my broken IE6 can read your page. Couldn't a few days ago. Did you change something, or is it the new year?
Jeff
Reply to
A.Gent
So XHTML 1.0 Strict, which that page says it is--- ' ?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?' it says in the first line-- isn't really XHTML at all? That's what you're saying?
Religious Wars in other words,
NIH you mean?
Reply to
John Ings
I literally just a few minutes ago "fixed" it. XHTML pages are supposed to be served up with MIME type application/xhtml+xml, but I took a "warning" hit from the validator and changed that to text/html to fool IE into thinking I was talking the outdated standard. Everything else is still compliant.
Reply to
PhysicsGenius
Huh?
Not really. Every industry has accepted "best practices". HTML, being something that was just kind of cooked up by Berners-Lee, didn't follow those practices very well. XHTML reformulates the power of HTML using the best practices of software engineering. As a member of the computer industry, I can't in good conscience ignore those practices in my own work.
To an outsider that may sound like a religious stance. But it has practical consequences and benefits. I'm sure anyone here can think of examples from his or her own industry. Wasn't there a big brou-ha-ha here a few weeks ago about people who didn't know how to read a tape measure the Right Way?
Reply to
PhysicsGenius
I don't consider my browser to be broken. It does what I need it to do. You remind me of the Linux snobs who go on about their superior OS and then whine about the things it won't do. If it is incompatible with the majority of what everyone uses, maybe your "advanced" stuff is what is broken. If it has been around that long and is still not working with mainstream products...
Reply to
Ron Thompson
Well, it works just fine on my IE6.0.2800.1106 with all the latest doo-dads.
Dang! I was going to complain about a few errant characters left over from a comment (?) in the code, ("]>" I think) but they're gone now, too.
Well done.
Oh - the furnace looks great too! (Though here in stinky hot Sydney, I'd rather not be firing it up until June.)
Cheers Jeff
Reply to
A.Gent
Yeah, you must have been trying it as I was cleaning those up.
Thanks.
I'm still a little worried about one thing. The furnace lining isn't ROCK hard, not like cement. If I poke it too hard or push on an edge, it crumbles off. It's not in any danger of collapsing, though. Is this right, or even acceptable? I used sand, fireclay and water.
Reply to
PhysicsGenius
I use a muffle furnace ( a bought one, not a home-made ) frequently, and its refractory is reasonably hard, but brittle. It won't stand for rough treatment, but I'd break my fingernail if I tried to break off an edge.
I don't know if they harden up over time - I suspect they do. I think you *still* may have mix problems, but don't worry too much. Treat it gently, and I'm sure it'll behave.
Cheers Jeff
Reply to
A.Gent
Great! I can see it now.
While your doing all that "right way" stuff in writing your page, how about using image placeholders so the page doesn't shift while you are reading and it is still downloading.
And when you get tired of all the charcoal mess, you can graduate to propane, as most in the hobby have done.
Your remarks about Gingery's choice of materials ("Gingery wanted one that was big enough to fit the "standard flexible hose of a hair dryer", which I eventually realized meant a vacuum cleaner. I'd hate to see what he brushes his teeth with.") need to take into account how old this material is. When it was written, five gallon metal buckets and hose type hair driers were everywhere.
For more info you may be interesting in the castinghobby newsgroup:
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I'm off to read the rest of your site. Have fun casting!
Reply to
Ron Thompson
I just realized that changing from application/xhtml+xml to text/html makes my MathML not work. That's unacceptable. I'm trying text/xml, but the only IE I have here is so old that it's not a valid test. Could you try it again?
Reply to
PhysicsGenius

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